In the Night of Time: A Novel

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A Washington Post Best Book of the Year: A “hypnotic” novel of the Spanish Civil War and one man’s quest to escape it (Colm Tóibín, The New York Review of Books).

October 1936. Spanish architect Ignacio Abel arrives at Penn Station, the final stop on his journey from war-torn Madrid, where he has left behind his wife and children, abandoning them to uncertainty. Crossing the fragile borders of Europe, Ignacio reflects on months of fratricidal conflict in his embattled country, his transformation from a bricklayer’s son to a respected bourgeois husband and professional, and the all-consuming love affair with an American woman that forever altered his life.
 
Winner of the 2012 Prix Méditerranée Étranger and hailed as a masterpiece, In the Night of Time is a sweeping, grand novel and an indelible portrait of a shattered society, written by one of Spain’s most important contemporary novelists.
 
“Labyrinthine and spellbinding . . . One of the most eloquent monuments to the Spanish Civil War ever to be raised in fiction.” —The Washington Post, “The Top 50 Fiction Books for 2014”
 
“An astonishingly vivid narrative that unfolds with hypnotic intensity by means of the constant interweaving of time and memory . . . Tolstoyan in its scale, emotional intensity and intellectual honesty.” —The Economist
 
“Epic . . . Intoxicating prose.” —Entertainment Weekly
 
“A War and Peace for the Spanish Civil War.” —Publishers Weekly
 
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More by Antonio Muñoz Molina

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An “amazing” novel about the diaspora of Sephardic Jews amid the tumult of twentieth century history (The Washington Post Book World).

From one of Spain’s most celebrated writers, this extraordinary blend of fiction, history, and memoir tells the story of the Sephardic diaspora through seventeen interlinked chapters.
 
“If Balzac wrote The Human Comedy, [Antonio] Muñoz Molina has written the adventure of exile, solitude, and memory,” Arturo Pérez-Reverte observed of this “masterpiece” that shifts seamlessly from the past to the present along the escape routes employed by Sephardic Jews across countries and continents as they fled Hitler’s Holocaust and Stalin’s purges in the mid-twentieth century (The New York Review of Books).
 
In a remarkable display of narrative dexterity, Muñoz Molina fashions a “rich and complex story” out of the experiences of people both real and imagined: Eugenia Ginzburg and Greta Buber-Neumann, one on a train to the gulag, the other heading toward a Nazi concentration camp; a shoemaker and a nun who become lovers in a small Spanish town; and Primo Levi, bound for Auschwitz (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel). From the well-known to the virtually unknown, all of Muñoz Molina’s characters are voices of separation, nostalgia, love, and endless waiting.
 
“Stories that vibrate beneath the burden of history, that lift with the breath of human life.” —Los Angeles Times Book Review
 
“A magnificent novel about the iniquity and horror of fanaticism, and especially the human being’s indestructible spirit.” —Mario Vargas Llosa
 
“Moving and often astonishing.” —The New York Times
3.7
15 total
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Additional Information

Publisher
HMH
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Published on
Dec 3, 2013
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Pages
656
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ISBN
9780547548050
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Historical / General
Fiction / Literary
Fiction / War & Military
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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My life was full of many unexpected experiences. Some were good, and some were bad. During that time of war, mostly bad times occurred more often than good times. Those good times didnt last longer. I think there is a reason why things happen to people, and as always there are results afterward, either good or bad. My hope all these years of war in South Sudan was that someday, there would be a joyful moment for me as the outcome of my horrible suffering. I do not have many good times to remember in my past life since the day I left South Sudan until the day I arrived in the United States of America. However, even then still, I always felt like I was missing something. Of course, indeed, part of me is missing: my whole family was not with me. I never gave up on myself when I was in that horrible situation. I resisted the pain I was facing. I wish of no ravage that I should do against my foes for what they did to me. I wish for the bad day to get over and hope for better tomorrow. I never except the weakness to engage my mind. Instead, I wish to preach the word of peace to my enemies for the sake of freedom in order to save the lives of the innocent. I wish to just speak out only the word of unification. I want to make the world aware of the war situation that was going on in my hometown and convey peace among the people and avoid more lives to be lost. War is wrong; we are all human beings with only one common goal: the soul. However, the only message you should be saying to your enemies is peace. Bear in mind that when you are torturing someone, you are torturing yourself as well. You might not feel it physically but emotionally, maybe not at the moment, but afterward, in the near future, when peace comes and when justice prevails. My parents used to tell me not to be afraid but to brave and strong. The fear one is the one got kill first in battle because they panic and run randomly into ambush.
I have been standing on the side of life, watching it float by. I want to swim in the river. I want to feel the current.

So writes Mamah Borthwick Cheney in her diary as she struggles to justify her clandestine love affair with Frank Lloyd Wright. Four years earlier, in 1903, Mamah and her husband, Edwin, had commissioned the renowned architect to design a new home for them. During the construction of the house, a powerful attraction developed between Mamah and Frank, and in time the lovers, each married with children, embarked on a course that would shock Chicago society and forever change their lives.

In this ambitious debut novel, fact and fiction blend together brilliantly. While scholars have largely relegated Mamah to a footnote in the life of America’s greatest architect, author Nancy Horan gives full weight to their dramatic love story and illuminates Cheney’s profound influence on Wright.

Drawing on years of research, Horan weaves little-known facts into a compelling narrative, vividly portraying the conflicts and struggles of a woman forced to choose between the roles of mother, wife, lover, and intellectual. Horan’s Mamah is a woman seeking to find her own place, her own creative calling in the world. Mamah’s is an unforgettable journey marked by choices that reshape her notions of love and responsibility, leading inexorably ultimately lead to this novel’s stunning conclusion.

Elegantly written and remarkably rich in detail, Loving Frank is a fitting tribute to a courageous woman, a national icon, and their timeless love story.

BONUS: This edition includes an excerpt from Nancy Horan's Under the Wide and Starry Sky.

Advance praise for Loving Frank:

“Loving Frank is one of those novels that takes over your life. It’s mesmerizing and fascinating–filled with complex characters, deep passions, tactile descriptions of astonishing architecture, and the colorful immediacy of daily life a hundred years ago–all gathered into a story that unfolds with riveting urgency.”
–Lauren Belfer, author of City of Light

“This graceful, assured first novel tells the remarkable story of the long-lived affair between Frank Lloyd Wright, a passionate and impossible figure, and Mamah Cheney, a married woman whom Wright beguiled and led beyond the restraint of convention. It is engrossing, provocative reading.”
——Scott Turow

“It takes great courage to write a novel about historical people, and in particular to give voice to someone as mythic as Frank Lloyd Wright. This beautifully written novel about Mamah Cheney and Frank Lloyd Wright’s love affair is vivid and intelligent, unsentimental and compassionate.”
——Jane Hamilton

“I admire this novel, adore this novel, for so many reasons: The intelligence and lyricism of the prose. The attention to period detail. The epic proportions of this most fascinating love story. Mamah Cheney has been in my head and heart and soul since reading this book; I doubt she’ ll ever leave.”
–Elizabeth Berg
Agnes Among the Gargoyles commences at the dedication of an office tower constructed atop Grand Central Station. The building, the work of billionaire real estate baron Ronald Wegeman, sticks out of the venerable Beaux-Arts railroad terminal like a thirty-story middle finger. When a plan to assassinate Wegeman goes awry, Agnes Travertine finds herself hailed as a hero and drawn into the Great Man's circle. Meanwhile, Agnes's friend Barbara Foucault becomes the first victim of the Minotaur of the Labyrinth, New York City's latest serial killer. Stewardesses, nightclub singers, nurses, rabbi's wives--no one is safe from his blood lust. Agnes wonders: is it disrespectful to Barbara's memory to fall in love with the detective assigned to the case? Wegeman opens The Palace of Versailles, his showplace casino in Coney Island, but the applause is not as tumultuous as he expects. His daughter Sarah, freshly expelled from prep school for having a social conscience, yearns to help society. She attaches herself to Agnes, and films a documentary about Wayne Torrence, a homeless gay man with AIDS in search of Eastern enlightenment, all the while battling off the advances of Ivan Kroger, a dweeb into hobbits and monsters who's been following her around for months. Ivan seems a hopeless loser until he wins Sarah's admiration through an act of heroism. On the fringes of the action, like a pair of extras from some forgotten film noir, Bezel and the Frenchman, two New York grifters, join forces with a child of privilege called Spock and a disgruntled employee of the Metropolitan Transit Authority in order to plot their last chance at the big score. Times Square redevelops, Penn Station is rebuilt, Syker's department store almost reopens. While being pursued romantically by a lesbian teacher of the blind, Agnes uncovers some disturbing truths about her mother and dead father. Tollivetti of the Graphic is there, as always, to cover it all. And Agnes at last finds her life entwined, briefly but significantly, with those of Bezel and the Frenchman. For an author bio and photo, reviews, and a reading sample, visit bosonbooks.com.
An “amazing” novel about the diaspora of Sephardic Jews amid the tumult of twentieth century history (The Washington Post Book World).

From one of Spain’s most celebrated writers, this extraordinary blend of fiction, history, and memoir tells the story of the Sephardic diaspora through seventeen interlinked chapters.
 
“If Balzac wrote The Human Comedy, [Antonio] Muñoz Molina has written the adventure of exile, solitude, and memory,” Arturo Pérez-Reverte observed of this “masterpiece” that shifts seamlessly from the past to the present along the escape routes employed by Sephardic Jews across countries and continents as they fled Hitler’s Holocaust and Stalin’s purges in the mid-twentieth century (The New York Review of Books).
 
In a remarkable display of narrative dexterity, Muñoz Molina fashions a “rich and complex story” out of the experiences of people both real and imagined: Eugenia Ginzburg and Greta Buber-Neumann, one on a train to the gulag, the other heading toward a Nazi concentration camp; a shoemaker and a nun who become lovers in a small Spanish town; and Primo Levi, bound for Auschwitz (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel). From the well-known to the virtually unknown, all of Muñoz Molina’s characters are voices of separation, nostalgia, love, and endless waiting.
 
“Stories that vibrate beneath the burden of history, that lift with the breath of human life.” —Los Angeles Times Book Review
 
“A magnificent novel about the iniquity and horror of fanaticism, and especially the human being’s indestructible spirit.” —Mario Vargas Llosa
 
“Moving and often astonishing.” —The New York Times
The inspiring international bestseller of a seemingly ordinary woman who uses her talent and courage to transform herself first into a prestigious couturier and then into an undercover agent for the Allies during World War II.

Between Youth and Adulthood…

At age twelve, Sira Quiroga sweeps the atelier floors where her single mother works as a seamstress. At fourteen, she quietly begins her own apprenticeship. By her early twenties she has learned the ropes of the business and is engaged to a modest government clerk. But everything changes when two charismatic men burst unexpectedly into her neatly mapped-out life: an attractive salesman and the father she never knew.

Between War and Peace…

With the Spanish Civil War brewing in Madrid, Sira leaves her mother and her fiancé, impetuously following her handsome lover to Morocco. However, she soon finds herself abandoned, penniless, and heartbroken in an exotic land. Among the odd collection of European expatriates trapped there by the worsening political situation back on the Continent, Sira reinvents herself by turning to the one skill that can save her: her gift for creating beautiful clothes.

Between Love and Duty…

As England, Germany, and the other great powers launch into the dire conflict of World War II, Sira is persuaded to return to Madrid, where she takes on a new identity to embark upon the most dangerous undertaking of her career. As the preeminent couturier for an eager clientele of Nazi officers’ wives, Sira becomes embroiled in the half-lit world of espionage and political conspiracy rife with love, intrigue, and betrayal.

An outstanding success around the world, The Time in Between has sold more than two million copies and inspired the Spanish television series based on the book, dubbed by the media as the “Spanish Downton Abbey.” In the US it was a critical and commercial hit, and a New York Times bestseller in paperback. It is one of those rare, richly textured novels that enthrall down to the last page. María Dueñas reminds us how it feels to be swept away by a masterful storyteller.
A special fiftieth anniversary edition of Kurt Vonnegut’s masterpiece, “a desperate, painfully honest attempt to confront the monstrous crimes of the twentieth century” (Time), featuring a new introduction by Kevin Powers, author of the National Book Award finalist The Yellow Birds
 
Selected by the Modern Library as one of the 100 best novels of all time
 
Slaughterhouse-Five, an American classic, is one of the world’s great antiwar books. Centering on the infamous World War II firebombing of Dresden, the novel is the result of what Kurt Vonnegut described as a twenty-three-year struggle to write a book about what he had witnessed as an American prisoner of war. It combines historical fiction, science fiction, autobiography, and satire in an account of the life of Billy Pilgrim, a barber’s son turned draftee turned optometrist turned alien abductee. As Vonnegut had, Billy experiences the destruction of Dresden as a POW. Unlike Vonnegut, he experiences time travel, or coming “unstuck in time.”

An instant bestseller, Slaughterhouse-Five made Kurt Vonnegut a cult hero in American literature, a reputation that only strengthened over time, despite his being banned and censored by some libraries and schools for content and language. But it was precisely those elements of Vonnegut’s writing—the political edginess, the genre-bending inventiveness, the frank violence, the transgressive wit—that have inspired generations of readers not just to look differently at the world around them but to find the confidence to say something about it. Authors as wide-ranging as Norman Mailer, John Irving, Michael Crichton, Tim O’Brien, Margaret Atwood, Elizabeth Strout, David Sedaris, Jennifer Egan, and J. K. Rowling have all found inspiration in Vonnegut’s words. Jonathan Safran Foer has described Vonnegut as “the kind of writer who made people—young people especially—want to write.” George Saunders has declared Vonnegut to be “the great, urgent, passionate American writer of our century, who offers us . . . a model of the kind of compassionate thinking that might yet save us from ourselves.”

Fifty years after its initial publication at the height of the Vietnam War, Vonnegut's portrayal of political disillusionment, PTSD, and postwar anxiety feels as relevant, darkly humorous, and profoundly affecting as ever, an enduring beacon through our own era’s uncertainties.

“Poignant and hilarious, threaded with compassion and, behind everything, the cataract of a thundering moral statement.”—The Boston Globe
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