The Worst Journey in the World

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A firsthand account of Scott's disastrous Antarctic expedition

The Worst Journey in the World recounts Robert Falcon Scott’s ill-fated expedition to the South Pole. Apsley Cherry-Garrard—the youngest member of Scott’s team and one of three men to make and survive the notorious Winter Journey—draws on his firsthand experiences as well as the diaries of his compatriots to create a stirring and detailed account of Scott’s legendary expedition. Cherry himself would be among the search party that discovered the corpses of Scott and his men, who had long since perished from starvation and brutal cold. It is through Cherry’s insightful narrative and keen descriptions that Scott and the other members of the expedition are fully memorialized.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
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About the author

Apsley Cherry-Garrard (1886-1959) was one of the youngest members of Captain Scott's final expedition to the Antarctic which he joined to collect the eggs of the Emperor penguin. After the expedition, Cherry-Garrard served in the First World War and was invalided home. With the zealous encouragement of his neighbour, George Bernard Shaw, Cherry-Garrard wrote The Worst Journey in the World (1922) in an attempt to overcome the horror of the journey. As the years unravelled he faced a terrible struggle against depression, breakdown and despair, haunted by the possibility that he could have saved Scott and his companions.

Caroline Alexander has written for The New Yorker, Granta, Condé Nast Traveler, Smithsonian, Outside, and National Geographic and is the author of four previous books.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Penguin
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Published on
Feb 28, 2006
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Pages
640
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ISBN
9781440626968
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Adventurers & Explorers
History / Expeditions & Discoveries
Travel / Special Interest / Adventure
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Apsley Cherry-Garrard
In 1910, hoping that the study of penguin eggs would provide an evolutionary link between birds and reptiles, a group of explorers left Cardiff by boat on Robert Falcon Scott’s expedition to Antarctica. Not all of them would return. Written by one of its survivors, The Worst Journey in the World tells the moving and dramatic story of the disastrous Scott expedition. Driven by an obsession for scientific knowledge, these brave polar explorers embarked on a journey into the unknown, testing their endurance by pushing themselves to the ultimate physical and mental limits as they surveyed the striking and mammoth land that lay far to the south. Their goal was to discover as much as was scientifically possible about the terrain and habitat of Antarctica, and to be the first to reach the South Pole. The party was plagued by bad luck, weather conditions of unanticipated ferocity, and the physical deterioration of the party itself on the last part of the journey.

The youngest member of the team and its sole survivor, Apsley Cherry-Garrard gives a gripping account of Scott’s last expedition. The author was also part of the rescue team that eventually found the frozen bodies of Scott and the three men who had accompanied him on the final push to the Pole. These deaths would haunt him for the rest of his life as he questioned the decisions he had made and the actions he had taken in the days leading up to the Polar Party’s demise.

Prior to this sad denouement, Cherry-Garrard’s account is filled with details of scientific discovery and anecdotes of human resilience in a harsh environment. Each participant in the expedition is brought fully to life. The author’s recollections are supported by diary excerpts and accounts from other teammates.
Apsley Cherry-Garrard
“And I tell you, if you have the desire for knowledge and the power to give it physical expression, go out and explore,” wrote Apsley Cherry-Garrard in the opening chapters of his now classic exploration narrative, The Worst Journey in the World. The incredible tale that he tells is of the fated last voyage of Captain Robert Scott and his crew to the outermost reaches of the South Pole on the Terra Nova. Chronicling the journey of the Terra Nova from England in 1910 to New Zealand in 1913, The Worst Journey in the World vividly describes the entirety of Scott’s harrowing and tragic final expedition. Driven by a lust to investigate the untold scientific knowledge contained within the South Pole, these courageous pioneers embarked on a journey into previously unexplored territory, subjecting themselves to the ultimate physical and mental limits as they traveled the massive expanses of the icy tundra.

Cherry-Garrard was a key member of the Terra Nova crew that, in addition to the desire to uncover scientific data, desperately sought to be the first Europeans to reach the South Pole. But the expedition was thwarted at every turn by punishing weather, extreme bad luck, and the intense physical and mental decline of the crew on the final stages of their journey. Confronted by the shattering knowledge that rival explorer Roald Amundsen had reached the South Pole only a few weeks before them, Scott’s team then had to negotiate the last stage of their voyage, a doomed attempt which has no equal in peril, disaster, and tragedy.

Skyhorse Publishing, as well as our Arcade imprint, are proud to publish a broad range of books for readers interested in history--books about World War II, the Third Reich, Hitler and his henchmen, the JFK assassination, conspiracies, the American Civil War, the American Revolution, gladiators, Vikings, ancient Rome, medieval times, the old West, and much more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.
Apsley Cherry-Garrard
“And I tell you, if you have the desire for knowledge and the power to give it physical expression, go out and explore,” wrote Apsley Cherry-Garrard in the opening chapters of his now classic exploration narrative, The Worst Journey in the World. The incredible tale that he tells is of the fated last voyage of Captain Robert Scott and his crew to the outermost reaches of the South Pole on the Terra Nova. Chronicling the journey of the Terra Nova from England in 1910 to New Zealand in 1913, The Worst Journey in the World vividly describes the entirety of Scott’s harrowing and tragic final expedition. Driven by a lust to investigate the untold scientific knowledge contained within the South Pole, these courageous pioneers embarked on a journey into previously unexplored territory, subjecting themselves to the ultimate physical and mental limits as they traveled the massive expanses of the icy tundra.

Cherry-Garrard was a key member of the Terra Nova crew that, in addition to the desire to uncover scientific data, desperately sought to be the first Europeans to reach the South Pole. But the expedition was thwarted at every turn by punishing weather, extreme bad luck, and the intense physical and mental decline of the crew on the final stages of their journey. Confronted by the shattering knowledge that rival explorer Roald Amundsen had reached the South Pole only a few weeks before them, Scott’s team then had to negotiate the last stage of their voyage, a doomed attempt which has no equal in peril, disaster, and tragedy.

Skyhorse Publishing, as well as our Arcade imprint, are proud to publish a broad range of books for readers interested in history--books about World War II, the Third Reich, Hitler and his henchmen, the JFK assassination, conspiracies, the American Civil War, the American Revolution, gladiators, Vikings, ancient Rome, medieval times, the old West, and much more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.
Apsley Cherry-Garrard
"The Worst Journey in the World is to travel writing what War and Peace is to the novel . . . a masterpiece."—The New York Review of Books
"When people ask me, 'What is your favorite travel book?' I nearly always name this book. It is about courage, misery, starvation, heroism, exploration, discovery, and friendship." —Paul Theroux
National Geographic Adventure magazine hailed this volume as the #1 greatest adventure book of all time. Published in 1922 by an expedition survivor, it recounts the riveting tale of Robert Falcon Scott's ill-fated race to the South Pole. Apsley Cherry-Garrard, the youngest member of the party, offers sensitive characterizations of each of his companions. Their journal entries complement his narrative, providing vivid perspectives on the expedition's dangers and hardships as well as its inspiring examples of optimism, strength, and selflessness.
Hoping to prove a missing link between reptiles and birds, the author and his companions traveled through the dead of Antarctic winter to the remote breeding grounds of the Emperor Penguin. They crossed a frozen sea in utter darkness, dragging an 800-pound sledge through blizzards, howling winds, and average temperatures of 60 below zero. This "worst journey" was followed by the disastrous trek to the South Pole. Cherry-Garrard's compelling account constitutes a moving testament to Scott and to the other men of the expedition. This new edition of the adventure classic features several pages of vintage photographs.
Apsley Cherry-Garrard
In 1910, hoping that the study of penguin eggs would provide an evolutionary link between birds and reptiles, a group of explorers left Cardiff by boat on Robert Falcon Scott’s expedition to Antarctica. Not all of them would return. Written by one of its survivors, The Worst Journey in the World tells the moving and dramatic story of the disastrous Scott expedition. Driven by an obsession for scientific knowledge, these brave polar explorers embarked on a journey into the unknown, testing their endurance by pushing themselves to the ultimate physical and mental limits as they surveyed the striking and mammoth land that lay far to the south. Their goal was to discover as much as was scientifically possible about the terrain and habitat of Antarctica, and to be the first to reach the South Pole. The party was plagued by bad luck, weather conditions of unanticipated ferocity, and the physical deterioration of the party itself on the last part of the journey.

The youngest member of the team and its sole survivor, Apsley Cherry-Garrard gives a gripping account of Scott’s last expedition. The author was also part of the rescue team that eventually found the frozen bodies of Scott and the three men who had accompanied him on the final push to the Pole. These deaths would haunt him for the rest of his life as he questioned the decisions he had made and the actions he had taken in the days leading up to the Polar Party’s demise.

Prior to this sad denouement, Cherry-Garrard’s account is filled with details of scientific discovery and anecdotes of human resilience in a harsh environment. Each participant in the expedition is brought fully to life. The author’s recollections are supported by diary excerpts and accounts from other teammates.
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