Social History Assessment

SAGE Publications
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"Her book takes us on a journey back to the basics of conducting a thorough and informative social history and is an account of what a real social history involves...I recommend this book not only for the novice but also for all clinicians who want an edge on how to accumulate more pertinent information concerning their patients and to guide their treatment." —PSYCCRITIQUESIn the mental health and human service professions, taking a social history assessment marks the start of most therapeutic interventions. Social History Assessment is the first resource to offer practical guidance about interpreting the social history. Author Arlene Bowers Andrews provides rich resources to assist helping professionals as they gather and–most importantly–interpret information about social relationships in the lives of individuals.
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About the author

Dr. Arlene Bowers Andrews, community psychologist and Professor of Social Work at the University of South Carolina, has extensive experience in community-based practice and research, program evaluation, and services systems for families affected by turbulence. At USC she was a founder and former director of the Institute for Families in Society, an interdisciplinary research center that conducts research to enhance families through community partnerships. Prior to her academic career, she was the founding executive director of Sistercare, a multi-county system of services to families affected by intimate partner violence, founding executive director of Prevent Child Abuse-South Carolina, and a board member of multiple community and regional organizations, including the Southern Regional Council. She served for eight years on the South Carolina Joint Legislative Committee on Children and families and is an active volunteer in faith-based youth development work. She has been an expert witness on matters of family history and human behavior in federal and several state courts.

Dr. Andrews is co-editor of The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: Implementing the Right to an Adequate Standard of Living (Praeger, 1999), co-author with Elizabeth Beck and Sarah Escholz of In the Shadow of Death: Families of Loved Ones Who Face the Death Penalty (Oxford University Press, 2006), and the author of Victimization and Survivor Services (Springer, 1992), Send Me! The Story of Salkehatchie Summer Service (Providence Publishing House, 2006), and several articles and book chapters regarding violence prevention and community systems development.

Dr. Andrews is a graduate of Duke University and the University of South Carolina.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SAGE Publications
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Published on
Dec 7, 2006
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Pages
224
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ISBN
9781452222523
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Social Science / Social Work
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Today, any regular newspaper reader is likely to be exposed to reports on manifold forms of (physical, emotional, sexual) child abuse on the one hand, and abnormal behavior, misconduct or offences of children and minors on the other hand. Occasionally reports on children as victims and children as offenders may appear on the same issue or even the same page. Rather seldom the more complex and largely hidden phenomena of structural hostility or indifference of society with a view to children are being dealt with in the press. Such fragmentary, ambiguous, incoherent or even contradictory perception of children in modem society indicates that, firstly, there is a lack of reliable information on modem childhood, and secondly, children are still treated as a comparatively irrelevant population group in society. This conclusion may be surprising in particular when drawn at the end of The Century of the Child proclaimed by Ellen Key as early as 1902. Actually, there exist unclarities and ambiguities about the evolution of childhood in the last century not only in public opinion, but also in scientific literature. While De Mause with his psycho-historic model of the evolution of childhood, comprising different stages from infanticide, abandonment, ambivalence, intrusion, socialisation to support, underlines the continuous improvement of the condition of childhood throughout history and thus rather confirms Key's expectations, Aries, with his social history of childhood, seems to hold a more culturally pessimistic view.
Today, any regular newspaper reader is likely to be exposed to reports on manifold forms of (physical, emotional, sexual) child abuse on the one hand, and abnormal behavior, misconduct or offences of children and minors on the other hand. Occasionally reports on children as victims and children as offenders may appear on the same issue or even the same page. Rather seldom the more complex and largely hidden phenomena of structural hostility or indifference of society with a view to children are being dealt with in the press. Such fragmentary, ambiguous, incoherent or even contradictory perception of children in modem society indicates that, firstly, there is a lack of reliable information on modem childhood, and secondly, children are still treated as a comparatively irrelevant population group in society. This conclusion may be surprising in particular when drawn at the end of The Century of the Child proclaimed by Ellen Key as early as 1902. Actually, there exist unclarities and ambiguities about the evolution of childhood in the last century not only in public opinion, but also in scientific literature. While De Mause with his psycho-historic model of the evolution of childhood, comprising different stages from infanticide, abandonment, ambivalence, intrusion, socialisation to support, underlines the continuous improvement of the condition of childhood throughout history and thus rather confirms Key's expectations, Aries, with his social history of childhood, seems to hold a more culturally pessimistic view.
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