The German Girl: A Novel

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A young girl flees Nazi-occupied Germany with her family and best friend, only to discover that the overseas refuge they had been promised is an illusion in this “powerful and affecting” (Kirkus Reviews) debut novel, perfect for fans of The Nightingale, All the Light We Cannot See, and Schindler’s List.

Before everything changed, young Hannah Rosenthal lived a charmed life. But now, in 1939, the streets of Berlin are draped with red, white, and black flags; her family’s fine possessions are hauled away; and they are no longer welcome in the places that once felt like home. Hannah and her best friend, Leo Martin, make a pact: whatever the future has in store for them, they’ll meet it together.

Hope appears in the form of the S.S. St. Louis, a transatlantic liner offering Jews safe passage out of Germany. After a frantic search to obtain visas, the Rosenthals and the Martins depart on the luxurious ship bound for Havana. Life on board the St. Louis is like a surreal holiday for the refugees, with masquerade balls, exquisite meals, and polite, respectful service. But soon ominous rumors from Cuba undermine the passengers’ fragile sense of safety. From one day to the next, impossible choices are offered, unthinkable sacrifices are made, and the ship that once was their salvation seems likely to become their doom.

Seven decades later in New York City, on her twelfth birthday, Anna Rosen receives a strange package from an unknown relative in Cuba, her great-aunt Hannah. Its contents will inspire Anna and her mother to travel to Havana to learn the truth about their family’s mysterious and tragic past, a quest that will help Anna understand her place and her purpose in the world.

The German Girl sweeps from Berlin at the brink of the Second World War to Cuba on the cusp of revolution, to New York in the wake of September 11, before reaching its deeply moving conclusion in the tumult of present-day Havana. Based on a true story, this masterful novel gives voice to the joys and sorrows of generations of exiles, forever seeking a place called home.
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About the author

Armando Lucas Correa is an award-winning journalist, author, and the editor-in-chief for People en Español, the top-selling Hispanic magazine in the United States. Correa is the recipient of various journalistic awards from the National Association of Hispanic Publications and the Society of Professional Journalism. The German Girl is his first novel. Please visit

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Simon and Schuster
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Published on
Oct 18, 2016
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Fiction / Historical
Fiction / Jewish
Fiction / Sagas
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • For readers of The Nightingale and Sarah’s Key, inspired by the life of a real World War II heroine, this remarkable debut novel reveals the power of unsung women to change history in their quest for love, freedom, and second chances.

New York socialite Caroline Ferriday has her hands full with her post at the French consulate and a new love on the horizon. But Caroline’s world is forever changed when Hitler’s army invades Poland in September 1939—and then sets its sights on France.

An ocean away from Caroline, Kasia Kuzmerick, a Polish teenager, senses her carefree youth disappearing as she is drawn deeper into her role as courier for the underground resistance movement. In a tense atmosphere of watchful eyes and suspecting neighbors, one false move can have dire consequences.

For the ambitious young German doctor, Herta Oberheuser, an ad for a government medical position seems her ticket out of a desolate life. Once hired, though, she finds herself trapped in a male-dominated realm of Nazi secrets and power.

The lives of these three women are set on a collision course when the unthinkable happens and Kasia is sent to Ravensbrück, the notorious Nazi concentration camp for women. Their stories cross continents—from New York to Paris, Germany, and Poland—as Caroline and Kasia strive to bring justice to those whom history has forgotten.

USA Today “New and Noteworthy” Book • LibraryReads Top Ten Pick

“Harrowing . . . Lilac illuminates.”—People

“A compelling, page-turning narrative . . . Lilac Girls falls squarely into the groundbreaking category of fiction that re-examines history from a fresh, female point of view. It’s smart, thoughtful and also just an old-fashioned good read.”—Fort Worth Star-Telegram

“A powerful story for readers everywhere . . . Martha Hall Kelly has brought readers a firsthand glimpse into one of history’s most frightening memories. A novel that brings to life what these women and many others suffered. . . . I was moved to tears.”—San Francisco Book Review

“Extremely moving and memorable . . . This impressive debut should appeal strongly to historical fiction readers and to book clubs that adored Kristin Hannah’s The Nightingale and Anthony Doerr’s All the Light We Cannot See.”—Library Journal (starred review)

“[A] compelling first novel . . . This is a page-turner demonstrating the tests and triumphs civilians faced during war, complemented by Kelly’s vivid depiction of history and excellent characters.”—Publishers Weekly

“Kelly vividly re-creates the world of Ravensbrück.”—Kirkus Reviews

“Inspired by actual events and real people, Martha Hall Kelly has woven together the stories of three women during World War II that reveal the bravery, cowardice, and cruelty of those days. This is a part of history—women’s history—that should never be forgotten.”—Lisa See, New York Times bestselling author of China Dolls

“Profound, unsettling, and thoroughly . . . the best book I’ve read all year.”—Jamie Ford, New York Times bestselling author of Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet
From the highly acclaimed, multiple award-winning Anthony Doerr, the beautiful, stunningly ambitious instant New York Times bestseller about a blind French girl and a German boy whose paths collide in occupied France as both try to survive the devastation of World War II.

Marie-Laure lives with her father in Paris near the Museum of Natural History, where he works as the master of its thousands of locks. When she is six, Marie-Laure goes blind and her father builds a perfect miniature of their neighborhood so she can memorize it by touch and navigate her way home. When she is twelve, the Nazis occupy Paris and father and daughter flee to the walled citadel of Saint-Malo, where Marie-Laure’s reclusive great-uncle lives in a tall house by the sea. With them they carry what might be the museum’s most valuable and dangerous jewel.

In a mining town in Germany, the orphan Werner grows up with his younger sister, enchanted by a crude radio they find. Werner becomes an expert at building and fixing these crucial new instruments, a talent that wins him a place at a brutal academy for Hitler Youth, then a special assignment to track the resistance. More and more aware of the human cost of his intelligence, Werner travels through the heart of the war and, finally, into Saint-Malo, where his story and Marie-Laure’s converge.

Doerr’s “stunning sense of physical detail and gorgeous metaphors” (San Francisco Chronicle) are dazzling. Deftly interweaving the lives of Marie-Laure and Werner, he illuminates the ways, against all odds, people try to be good to one another. Ten years in the writing, a National Book Award finalist, All the Light We Cannot See is a magnificent, deeply moving novel from a writer “whose sentences never fail to thrill” (Los Angeles Times).
1939 - Berlin: Gaderne i den tyske hovedstad er hyllet i sort, rødt og hvidt; familien Rosenthals ejendele bliver konfiskeret, og de er ikke længere velkomne i den by, hvor de altid har hørt til. Ruteskibet SS St. Louis giver håb om en sikker vej ud af Tyskland til det solrige Cuba. Livet ombord er en hvirvelvind af maskeballer, udsøgte måltider og høflig opvartning, der føles som en surrealistisk ferie for unge Hannah Rosenthal og de øvrige flygtninge. Men ude på åbent hav når ildevarslende rygter fra Havana frem til passagererne, og deres skrøbelige tryghed begynder at smuldre. 2014 - New York: På Anna Rosens 12-års fødselsdag dukker en uventet pakke op. Den viser sig at være fra en ukendt slægtning på Cuba, og det særprægede indhold sender Anna og hendes mor på en opdagelsesrejse til Havana, tilbage til familiens tragiske fortid. Den tyske pige tager læseren med til Berlin og de tyske jøders flugt fra byen under optakten til 2. verdenskrig, over Cuba på tærsklen til revolution og til New York i efterveerne af 11. september, før den når sin slutning i nutidens omtumlede Havana. ”Et enestående indblik i modet, rædslen, æresfølelsen og overlevelseskraften hos mennesker, der er blevet afskrevet.” THOMAS KENEALLY, forfatter til Schindlers Liste ”En uforglemmelig roman, der vil indtage sin fortjente plads blandt de allerstørste romaner, der er skrevet om 2. verdenskrig.” KIRKUS REVIEWS ”Jeg kunne ikke lægge bogen fra mig, for nu kunne jeg jo se, hvordan min far og mor måtte have haft det, både i Tyskland og om bord på det skib.” JUDITH KOEPPEL STEEL, passager på SS St. Louis Om forfatteren: Armando Lucas Correa er en prisvindende journalist og chefredaktør på det spanske magasin People en Español, der storsælger i USA. Han har modtaget adskillige journalistiske priser fra National Association of Hispanic Publications og Society of Professional Journalism. Den tyske pige er hans første roman.
Una novela inolvidable ambientada en el Berlín de la primavera de 1939, la Cuba pre- y postrevolucionaria y el Nueva York después del 11 de septiembre.

Antes de que todo se desmoronara, Hannah Rosenthal y sus padres tenían una vida encantadora. Su familia, una de las más distinguidas en los altos círculos sociales berlineses, era admirada por amigos y vecinos. Ahora en 1939, Berlín se ha teñido de los colores blanco, rojo y negro de una bandera que no reconocen como suya. Hannah se refugia con su mejor amigo, Leo Martin, en los callejones y parques de una ciudad que ya no los quiere. Los dos niños hacen un pacto: pase lo que pase, se prometen un futuro juntos.

Un rayo de esperanza les llega a los Rosenthal y los Martin: el Saint Louis, un enorme y lujoso trasatlántico partirá de Hamburgo a Cuba con más de novecientos refugiados judíos. En la medida que todos los pasajeros se van llenando de ilusión por el brillante futuro que les espera, el amor de Hannah y Leo florece entre juegos, bailes de disfraces y cenas exquisitas. Hasta que empiezan a llegar noticias funestas desde La Habana cuyo gobierno prohíbe al barco atracar en el puerto. El majestuoso navío, que parecía la única salvación para ellos, podría terminar convirtiéndose en su pena de muerte.

Siete décadas más tarde, en Nueva York, a punto de cumplir sus doce años, Anna Rosen recibe, procedente de Cuba, un misterioso sobre de Hannah, su tía abuela, a quien nunca conoció. En un intento por armar el rompecabezas del pasado de su familia, Anna y su madre deciden viajar a encontrarse con Hannah. Al entrelazar el dolor del pasado con los misterios del presente, revive la memoria de un apellido olvidado y, a su vez, les rinde honor a aquellos que amó y que trágicamente perdió.
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