The New Inquisitions: Heretic-Hunting and the Intellectual Origins of Modern Totalitarianism

Oxford University Press
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The only book of its kind, The New Inquisitions is an exhilarating investigation into the intellectual origins of totalitarianism. Arthur Versluis unveils the connections between heretic hunting in early and medieval Christianity, and the emergence of totalitarianism in the twentieth century. He shows how secular political thinkers in the nineteenth century inaugurated a tradition of defending the Inquisition, and how Inquisition-style heretic-hunting later manifested across the spectrum of twentieth-century totalitarianism. An exceptionally wide-ranging work, The New Inquisitions begins with early Christianity, and traces heretic-hunting as a phenomenon through the middle ages and right into the twentieth century, showing how the same inquisitional modes of thought recur both on the political Left and on the political Right.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Oxford University Press
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Published on
Jul 27, 2006
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Pages
208
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ISBN
9780195345629
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / Political Ideologies / Fascism & Totalitarianism
Religion / History
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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