Polar Microbiology: The Ecology, Biodiversity and Bioremediation Potential of Microorganisms in Extremely Cold Environments

Free sample

Pollution has accompanied polar exploration since Captain John Davis’ arrival on the Antarctic continent in 1821 and has become an unavoidable consequence of oil spills in our polar regions. Fortunately, many of the organisms indigenous to Polar ecosystems have the ability to degrade pollutants. It is this metabolic capacity that forms the basis for bioremediation as a potential treatment for the hydrocarbons that contaminate the pristine polar environments.

The only book to cover the breadth of microbial ecology and diversity in polar regions with an emphasis on bioremediation, Polar Microbiology: The Ecology, Biodiversity, and Bioremediation Potential of Microorganisms in Extremely Cold Environments examines the diversity of polar microorganisms and their ability to degrade petroleum hydrocarbon contaminants in polar terrestrial and aquatic environments. Providing a unique perspective of these microorganisms in extremely cold temperatures, the book focuses on their taxonomy, physiology, biochemistry, population structure, bioremediation potential, and potential for biotechnology applications. Leading investigators in the field provide complete coverage of the microbiology relevant to the study of biodiversity and biodegradation of pollutants in the Arctic and Antarctic, including:

  • Microbial extremophiles living in cold and subzero temperature environments
  • Genetics and physiology of cold adaptation of microorganisms
  • Biodegradative microbial consortia in a defined closed environment
  • Molecular characterization of biodegradative microbial populations
  • Molecular approaches to assess biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons
  • Environmental impact of hydrocarbon contamination
  • Microbial biodiversity across Antarctic deserts

By bringing together the current state of scientific knowledge and research on microbial community structures in extremely cold temperatures, this thought provoking resource is the ideal starting point for the research that must be done if we are to effectively reduce human’s eco-footprint on our polar regions.

Read more

Reviews

Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
CRC Press
Read more
Published on
Dec 23, 2009
Read more
Pages
424
Read more
ISBN
9781420083880
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
Science / Earth Sciences / General
Science / Life Sciences / Microbiology
Science / Life Sciences / Molecular Biology
Science / Physics / Geophysics
Technology & Engineering / Environmental / General
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
Ronald M. Atlas
Handbook of Microbiological Media, Fourth Edition is an invaluable reference for every medical, veterinary, diagnostic, and academic laboratory, and now in its fourth edition, it is even more complete. This edition carries on the tradition of CRC Press handbook excellence, listing the formulations, methods of preparation, and uses for more than 7,000 microbiological media. With 1,500 more entries than any previous edition, the handbook includes both classic and modern media used for the identification, cultivation, and maintenance of diverse bacteria, archaea, and fungi.

The breadth of culture media in this comprehensive resource is enormous and has greatly expanded in recent years with the exploration of extreme habitats and the use of molecular methods to identify new lineages of bacteria and archaea. The media also represent significant advances in the ability to use chromogenic substrates to identify specific species and strains of bacteria, e.g., E. coli O157 and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). These media are extremely useful for clinical diagnostics and for the protection of the food supply from pathogenic microorganisms.

With over 7,000 formulations, this new edition includes all the media used for:

Routine examination of food and water Cultivating specific strains of bacteria, archaea, fungi, and protists, including many anaerobes and extremophiles Cultivating the numerous microorganisms currently available from the world’s global bioresource centers (BRCs)

Additionally, many culture media are now available that are free of animal components. Plant-based media eliminate possible contamination with prions, which is important for production of vaccines and pharmaceuticals.

The entries are arranged alphabetically by medium name and include composition, instructions for preparation, commercial sources, safety cautions, uses, and more. This reference contains the most comprehensive compilation of microbiological media available in a single volume. The only resource you need for all media types, it makes finding media for culturing diverse microorganisms quick and simple. With uniform presentations of media formulations and preparations, it presents easy-to-follow directions and cookbook recipes for preparing media. You won’t find a more complete or user-friendly microbiology reference anywhere.

Ronald M. Atlas
Responding to an estimated 14 million cases of food-borne disease that occur every year in the United States alone, the Food and Drug Administration and US Department of Agriculture have begun implementing new regulations and guidance for the microbial testing of foods. Similarly, Europe and other regions are implementing stricter oversight, as foodborne pathogens that cause deadly diseases such as e. coli 0157:H7 have raised the stakes everywhere. Food safety scientists have acted on this growing public health risk by developing improved media for the cultivation of bacteria, fungi, and viruses, much of it geared toward specific rapid detection.

Reflecting the development of these new media and the latest FDA recommendations, the second edition of the Handbook of Microbiological Media for the Examination of Foodprovides an essential resource for anyone involved with the monitoring of both food production and post-production quality control.

Organized alphabetically by medium, the expanded edition of this highly respected handbookincludes –

· Descriptions of nearly 1,400 media including those recommended by the FDA, as well as media used elsewhere in the world

· Concise and lucid instructions for the preparation and uses of each of the media

· Cross-referenced indexing that allows the media to be found by name or specific microorganism of interest

· Descriptions of expected results as they apply to microorganisms of importance for the examination of foods

· Common synonyms for the various media and listings of compositions, so that alternate media an be effectively employed when needed

Compiled by Ronald M. Atlas, a world-renowned researcher and author known for his pioneering work in pathogen detection, the Handbook of Microbiological Media for the Examination of Food, Second Edition, provides microbiologists with an essential tool for safeguarding public health.

James W. Snyder
While evolving molecular diagnostic methods are being heralded for the role they will play in improving our ability to cultivate and identify bacteria, fungi, and viruses, the reality is that those new methods are still beyond the technical and financial reach of most clinical laboratories. Most clinical microbiology laboratories still rely upon culture methods for the identification of microorganisms of medical importance.

The newest edition of the Handbook of Media for Clinical Microbiology addresses the needs of clinical microbiology laboratories and infectious disease researchers. Authored by Ronald Atlas and James Snyder, who over the years have built solid reputations among researchers for their exceptionally reliable media handbooks, this volume gives microbiologists in clinical and medical laboratories the reference they need to quickly and effectively deal with the modern challenges shaping the field.

Organized for a fast-paced environment, this fully updated Second Edition provides clinical diagnostic laboratories with an easy-to-use reference for those routine and specialized media employed in the cultivation of pathogenic bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Almost 1,650 media are described in this edition, among them many newly developed media designed for the rapid detection and identification of disease-causing microorganisms, including those responsible for emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases.

Describes media designed to cultivate and identify Escherichia coli O157:H7, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci

Includes chromogenic or fluorogenic substrates that permit the rapid detection of specific pathogens critical to the diagnosis of individuals with specific infectious diseases

The Handbook provides a compilation of the formulations, methods of preparation, and applications for media used in the clinical microbiology laboratory. Listings are alphabetical, and each includes medium composition, instruction for preparation, commercial sources, and intended uses. This highly useful resource also discusses the role of the clinical laboratory in the diagnosis of infectious diseases and the process for detecting infectious diseases, including specimen receipt, media selection, antibiotic susceptibility testing, and biosafety considerations. It includes media for the cultivation of emerging and re-emerging pathogens and bioterrorism threat agents.
Ronald M. Atlas
The detection and/or isolation and identification of pathogenic microorganisms is critical for the laboratory diagnosis of infectious diseases. With growth-dependant methods providing reliable means for identifying pathogens, traditional culturing continues to play an integral role in the detection and characterization of known and "new" microbial pathogens. Microbiologists, therefore, rely on a variety of media for the detection, isolation, characterization, and identification of primary and opportunistic microbial pathogens.

The Handbook of Media for Clinical and Public Health Microbiology provides a compilation of the formulations, methods of preparation, and applications for media used in clinical and public health microbiology laboratories. It is a significant update to the Handbook of Media for Clinical Microbiology, expanding the coverage to media used for public health epidemiological investigations of disease outbreaks and including media used for the detection of pathogens in foods and environmental samples. Comprising both classic and modern media, the handbook describes almost 1,800 types of media, listed alphabetically, including new media for the cultivation of emerging bacteria, fungi, and viruses that are causing major medical problems around the world. Examples of emerging pathogens are extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria, Escherichia coli O157:H7, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), and carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE). Many of the new media contain chromogenic or fluorogenic substrates that permit rapid detection of specific pathogens.

The handbook’s format allows easy reference to information needed to prepare media for cultivating clinically relevant microorganisms. It also contains descriptions of expected results for organisms that are important for the examination of foods, water, and other specimens of public health significance as well as clinical specimens.

Ronald M. Atlas
The detection and/or isolation and identification of pathogenic microorganisms is critical for the laboratory diagnosis of infectious diseases. With growth-dependant methods providing reliable means for identifying pathogens, traditional culturing continues to play an integral role in the detection and characterization of known and "new" microbial pathogens. Microbiologists, therefore, rely on a variety of media for the detection, isolation, characterization, and identification of primary and opportunistic microbial pathogens.

The Handbook of Media for Clinical and Public Health Microbiology provides a compilation of the formulations, methods of preparation, and applications for media used in clinical and public health microbiology laboratories. It is a significant update to the Handbook of Media for Clinical Microbiology, expanding the coverage to media used for public health epidemiological investigations of disease outbreaks and including media used for the detection of pathogens in foods and environmental samples. Comprising both classic and modern media, the handbook describes almost 1,800 types of media, listed alphabetically, including new media for the cultivation of emerging bacteria, fungi, and viruses that are causing major medical problems around the world. Examples of emerging pathogens are extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria, Escherichia coli O157:H7, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), and carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE). Many of the new media contain chromogenic or fluorogenic substrates that permit rapid detection of specific pathogens.

The handbook’s format allows easy reference to information needed to prepare media for cultivating clinically relevant microorganisms. It also contains descriptions of expected results for organisms that are important for the examination of foods, water, and other specimens of public health significance as well as clinical specimens.

Ronald M. Atlas
Responding to an estimated 14 million cases of food-borne disease that occur every year in the United States alone, the Food and Drug Administration and US Department of Agriculture have begun implementing new regulations and guidance for the microbial testing of foods. Similarly, Europe and other regions are implementing stricter oversight, as foodborne pathogens that cause deadly diseases such as e. coli 0157:H7 have raised the stakes everywhere. Food safety scientists have acted on this growing public health risk by developing improved media for the cultivation of bacteria, fungi, and viruses, much of it geared toward specific rapid detection.

Reflecting the development of these new media and the latest FDA recommendations, the second edition of the Handbook of Microbiological Media for the Examination of Foodprovides an essential resource for anyone involved with the monitoring of both food production and post-production quality control.

Organized alphabetically by medium, the expanded edition of this highly respected handbookincludes –

· Descriptions of nearly 1,400 media including those recommended by the FDA, as well as media used elsewhere in the world

· Concise and lucid instructions for the preparation and uses of each of the media

· Cross-referenced indexing that allows the media to be found by name or specific microorganism of interest

· Descriptions of expected results as they apply to microorganisms of importance for the examination of foods

· Common synonyms for the various media and listings of compositions, so that alternate media an be effectively employed when needed

Compiled by Ronald M. Atlas, a world-renowned researcher and author known for his pioneering work in pathogen detection, the Handbook of Microbiological Media for the Examination of Food, Second Edition, provides microbiologists with an essential tool for safeguarding public health.

Ronald M. Atlas
Handbook of Microbiological Media, Fourth Edition is an invaluable reference for every medical, veterinary, diagnostic, and academic laboratory, and now in its fourth edition, it is even more complete. This edition carries on the tradition of CRC Press handbook excellence, listing the formulations, methods of preparation, and uses for more than 7,000 microbiological media. With 1,500 more entries than any previous edition, the handbook includes both classic and modern media used for the identification, cultivation, and maintenance of diverse bacteria, archaea, and fungi.

The breadth of culture media in this comprehensive resource is enormous and has greatly expanded in recent years with the exploration of extreme habitats and the use of molecular methods to identify new lineages of bacteria and archaea. The media also represent significant advances in the ability to use chromogenic substrates to identify specific species and strains of bacteria, e.g., E. coli O157 and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). These media are extremely useful for clinical diagnostics and for the protection of the food supply from pathogenic microorganisms.

With over 7,000 formulations, this new edition includes all the media used for:

Routine examination of food and water Cultivating specific strains of bacteria, archaea, fungi, and protists, including many anaerobes and extremophiles Cultivating the numerous microorganisms currently available from the world’s global bioresource centers (BRCs)

Additionally, many culture media are now available that are free of animal components. Plant-based media eliminate possible contamination with prions, which is important for production of vaccines and pharmaceuticals.

The entries are arranged alphabetically by medium name and include composition, instructions for preparation, commercial sources, safety cautions, uses, and more. This reference contains the most comprehensive compilation of microbiological media available in a single volume. The only resource you need for all media types, it makes finding media for culturing diverse microorganisms quick and simple. With uniform presentations of media formulations and preparations, it presents easy-to-follow directions and cookbook recipes for preparing media. You won’t find a more complete or user-friendly microbiology reference anywhere.

James W. Snyder
While evolving molecular diagnostic methods are being heralded for the role they will play in improving our ability to cultivate and identify bacteria, fungi, and viruses, the reality is that those new methods are still beyond the technical and financial reach of most clinical laboratories. Most clinical microbiology laboratories still rely upon culture methods for the identification of microorganisms of medical importance.

The newest edition of the Handbook of Media for Clinical Microbiology addresses the needs of clinical microbiology laboratories and infectious disease researchers. Authored by Ronald Atlas and James Snyder, who over the years have built solid reputations among researchers for their exceptionally reliable media handbooks, this volume gives microbiologists in clinical and medical laboratories the reference they need to quickly and effectively deal with the modern challenges shaping the field.

Organized for a fast-paced environment, this fully updated Second Edition provides clinical diagnostic laboratories with an easy-to-use reference for those routine and specialized media employed in the cultivation of pathogenic bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Almost 1,650 media are described in this edition, among them many newly developed media designed for the rapid detection and identification of disease-causing microorganisms, including those responsible for emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases.

Describes media designed to cultivate and identify Escherichia coli O157:H7, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci

Includes chromogenic or fluorogenic substrates that permit the rapid detection of specific pathogens critical to the diagnosis of individuals with specific infectious diseases

The Handbook provides a compilation of the formulations, methods of preparation, and applications for media used in the clinical microbiology laboratory. Listings are alphabetical, and each includes medium composition, instruction for preparation, commercial sources, and intended uses. This highly useful resource also discusses the role of the clinical laboratory in the diagnosis of infectious diseases and the process for detecting infectious diseases, including specimen receipt, media selection, antibiotic susceptibility testing, and biosafety considerations. It includes media for the cultivation of emerging and re-emerging pathogens and bioterrorism threat agents.
©2017 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.