The Education of George Washington: How a forgotten book shaped the character of a hero

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George Washington—a man of honor, bravery and leadership. He is known as America’s first President, a great general, and a humble gentleman, but how did he become this man of stature?

The Education of George Washington answers this question with a new discovery about his past and the surprising book that shaped him. Who better to unearth them than George Washington’s great-nephew, Austin Washington?

Most Washington fans have heard of “The Rules of Civility” and learned that this guided our first President. But that’s not the book that truly made George Washington who he was. In The Education of George Washington, Austin Washington reveals the secret that he discovered about Washington’s past that explains his true model for conduct, honor, and leadership—an example that we could all use.

The Education of George Washington also includes a complete facsimile of the forgotten book that changed George Washington's life.
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About the author

The list of Regnery authors reads like a "who's who" of conservative thought, action, and history.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Simon and Schuster
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Published on
Feb 10, 2014
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Pages
400
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ISBN
9781621572206
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Presidents & Heads of State
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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