Plato's Republic (Vol 2): The Greek Text

Routledge
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First published in 1894, this book consists of essays by professors Jowett and Campbell about the classic Greek philosopher Plato, and his famous and widely read dialogue The Republic, which is considered one the world’s most influential works. Plato is believed to be the pivotal figure in the development of Western philosophy, and the editors explore this throughout the book along with relations to other Greek dialogues and authors.
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Publisher
Routledge
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Published on
Apr 18, 2019
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Pages
356
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ISBN
9780429602894
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Language
English
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Genres
Literary Criticism / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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