Ballads and Poems of Tragic Life

Createspace Independent Pub

Melpomene among her livid people, Ere stroke of lyre, upon Thaleia looks, Warned by old contests that one museful ripple Along those lips of rose with tendril hooks, Forebodes disturbance in the springs of pathos, Perchance may change of masks midway demand, Albeit the man rise mountainous as Athos, The woman wild as Cape Leucadia stand.
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About the author

George Meredith 1828-1909 George Meredith was born on February 12, 1828 in Portsmouth, England. He was a poet, novelist, and essayist of Victorian England and wrote 15 full-length novels, eight collections of poetry, and numerous minor works. Meredith is best known for powerful imagery, brilliant psychological insights, and carefully chosen diction. His works include The Ordeal of Richard Feverel, The Egoist, The Adventures of Harry Richmond, and Diana of the Crossways. His last collection of poems A Reading of Life, with Other Poems was published in 1901. In 1905 he was awarded the Order of Merit. He died on May 18, 1909.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Createspace Independent Pub
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Published on
Dec 31, 1887
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Pages
160
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Poetry / Subjects & Themes / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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The last of the great Victorian novelists, George Meredith was also a celebrated poet and a distinguished critic. This comprehensive eBook presents the complete works of George Meredith, with numerous illustrations, rare texts appearing in digital print for the first time, informative introductions and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 1)

* Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Meredith's life and works
* Concise introductions to the novels and other texts
* ALL 20 novels, with individual contents tables
* Images of how the books were first printed, giving your eReader a taste of the original Victorian texts
* Excellent formatting of the texts
* Special chronological and alphabetical contents tables for the poetry
* Easily locate the poems you want to read
* Includes rare essay collections appearing here for the first time in digital publishing
* Special criticism section, with 12 essays evaluating Meredith’s contribution to literature
* Features the celebrated biography on Meredith by Constantin Photiadès: GEORGE MEREDITH: HIS LIFE, GENIUS AND TEACHING, available in no other collection - discover Meredith's literary life
* Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres

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CONTENTS:

The Novels
THE SHAVING OF SHAGPAT
FARINA
THE ORDEAL OF RICHARD FEVEREL
EVAN HARRINGTON
EMILIA IN ENGLAND
RHODA FLEMING
VITTORIA
THE ADVENTURES OF HARRY RICHMOND
BEAUCHAMP’S CAREER
THE HOUSE ON THE BEACH
THE CASE OF GENERAL OPLE AND LADY CAMPER
THE TALE OF CHLOE
THE EGOIST
THE TRAGIC COMEDIANS
DIANA OF THE CROSSWAYS
ONE OF OUR CONQUERORS
LORD ORMONT AND HIS AMINTA
THE AMAZING MARRIAGE
CELT AND SAXON
THE GENTLEMAN OF FIFTY AND THE DAMSEL OF NINETEEN

The Play
THE SENTIMENTALISTS

The Poetry
INTRODUCTION TO THE POETRY OF GEORGE MEREDITH
LIST OF POEMS IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER
LIST OF POEMS IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER

The Essays
ESSAY ON COMEDY
MISCELLANEOUS ESSAYS
UP TO MIDNIGHT

The Criticism
THE QUALITY OF GEORGE MEREDITH by Oscar Wilde
MEREDITH by Arnold Bennett
THE NOVELS OF GEORGE MEREDITH by Virginia Woolf
ON REREADING MEREDITH by Virginia Woolf
GEORGE MEREDITH by Robert Lynd
TWO LETTERS by Robert Louis Stevenson
GEORGE MEREDITH AS A POET by Arthur Symons
ABOUT MEREDITH by G. K. Chesterton
GEORGE MEREDITH by James Joyce
HARDY AND MEREDITH by Richard Burton
GEORGE MEREDITH by W. E. Henley
LIVING MASTERS: MEREDITH AND HALL CAINE by David Christie Murray

The Biography
GEORGE MEREDITH: HIS LIFE, GENIUS AND TEACHING by Constantin Photiadès

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The devotion of these youths should give them a name in chivalry. In her honour, daily and nightly, they earned among themselves black bruises and paraded discoloured countenances, with the humble hope to find it pleasing in her sight. The tender fanatics went in bands up and down Rhineland, challenging wayfarers and the peasantry with staff and beaker to acknowledge the supremacy of their mistress. Whoso of them journeyed into foreign parts, wrote home boasting how many times his head had been broken on behalf of the fair Margarita; and if this happened very often, a spirit of envy was created, which compelled him, when he returned, to verify his prowess on no less than a score of his rivals. Not to possess a beauty-scar, as the wounds received in these endless combats were called, became the sign of inferiority, so that much voluntary maiming was conjectured to be going on; and to obviate this piece of treachery, minutes of fights were taken and attested, setting forth that a certain glorious cut or crack was honourably won in fair field; on what occasion; and from whom; every member of the White Rose Club keeping his particular scroll, and, on days of festival and holiday, wearing it haughtily in his helm. Strangers entering Cologne were astonished at the hideous appearance of the striplings, and thought they never had observed so ugly a race; but they were forced to admit the fine influence of beauty on commerce, seeing that the consumption of beer increased almost hourly. All Bavaria could not equal Cologne for quantity made away with.
The chief members of the White Rose Club were Berthold Schmidt, the rich goldsmith's son; Dietrich Schill, son of the imperial saddler; Heinrich Abt, Franz Endermann, and Ernst Geller, sons of chief burghers, each of whom carried a yard-long scroll in his cap, and was too disfigured in person for men to require an inspection of the document. They were dangerous youths to meet, for the oaths, ceremonies, and recantations they demanded from every wayfarer, under the rank of baron, were what few might satisfactorily perform, if lovers of woman other than the fair Margarita, or loyal husbands; and what none save trained heads and stomachs could withstand, however naturally manful. The captain of the Club was he who could drink most beer without intermediate sighing, and whose face reckoned the proudest number of slices and mixture of colours. The captaincy was most in dispute between Dietrich Schill and Berthold Schmidt, who, in the heat and constancy of contention, were gradually losing likeness to man. 'Good coin,' they gloried to reflect, 'needs no stamp.'
It was ordained that Shibli Bagarag, nephew to the renowned Baba Mustapha, chief barber to the Court of Persia, should shave Shagpat, the son of Shimpoor, the son of Shoolpi, the son of Shullum; and they had been clothiers for generations, even to the time of Shagpat, the illustrious.

Now, the story of Shibli Bagarag, and of the ball he followed, and of the subterranean kingdom he came to, and of the enchanted palace he entered, and of the sleeping king he shaved, and of the two princesses he released, and of the Afrite held in subjection by the arts of one and bottled by her, is it not known as 'twere written on the finger-nails of men and traced in their corner-robes? As the poet says: Ripe with oft telling and old is the tale, But 'tis of the sort that can never grow stale.

Now, things were in that condition with Shibli Bagarag, that on a certain day he was hungry and abject, and the city of Shagpat the clothier was before him; so he made toward it, deliberating as to how he should procure a meal, for he had not a dirhem in his girdle, and the remembrance of great dishes and savoury ingredients were to him as the illusion of rivers sheening on the sands to travellers gasping with thirst.

And he considered his case, crying, 'Surely this comes of wandering, and 'tis the curse of the inquiring spirit! for in Shiraz, where my craft is in favour, I should be sitting now with my uncle, Baba Mustapha, the loquacious one, cross-legged, partaking of seasoned sweet dishes, dipping my fingers in them, rejoicing my soul with scandal of the Court!'

Now, he came to a knoll of sand under a palm, from which the yellow domes and mosques of the city of Shagpat, and its black cypresses, and marble palace fronts, and shining pillars, and lofty carven arches that spanned half-circles of the hot grey sky, were plainly visible. Then gazed he awhile despondingly on the city of Shagpat, and groaned in contemplation of his evil plight, as is said by the poet: The curse of sorrow is comparison! As the sun casteth shade, night showeth star, We, measuring what we were by what we are, Behold the depth to which we are undone.
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