Daughters and Granddaughters of Farmworkers: Emerging from the Long Shadow of Farm Labor

Rutgers University Press
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In Daughters and Granddaughters of Farmworkers, Barbara Wells examines the work and family lives of Mexican American women in a community near the U.S.-Mexican border in California’s Imperial County. Decades earlier, their Mexican parents and grandparents had made the momentous decision to migrate to the United States as farmworkers. This book explores how that decision has worked out for these second- and third-generation Mexican Americans.

Wells provides stories of the struggles, triumphs, and everyday experiences of these women. She analyzes their narratives on a broad canvas that includes the social structures that create the barriers, constraints, and opportunities that have shaped their lives. The women have constructed far more settled lives than the immigrant generation that followed the crops, but many struggle to provide adequately for their families.

These women aspire to achieve the middle-class lives of the American Dream. But upward mobility is an elusive goal. The realities of life in a rural, agricultural border community strictly limit social mobility for these descendants of immigrant farm laborers. Reliance on family networks is a vital strategy for meeting the economic challenges they encounter. Wells illustrates clearly the ways in which the “long shadow” of farm work continues to permeate the lives and prospects of these women and their families.

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About the author

BARBARA WELLS is a professor of sociology and Vice President and Dean of Maryville College. She is a coauthor of  the award-winning textbook Diversity in Families.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Rutgers University Press
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Published on
Nov 15, 2013
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Pages
220
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ISBN
9780813570341
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Language
English
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Genres
Social Science / Agriculture & Food
Social Science / Emigration & Immigration
Social Science / Ethnic Studies / Hispanic American Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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From the Trade Paperback edition.
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