Sketching User Experiences: Getting the Design Right and the Right Design

Morgan Kaufmann
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Sketching User Experiences approaches design and design thinking as something distinct that needs to be better understood—by both designers and the people with whom they need to work— in order to achieve success with new products and systems. So while the focus is on design, the approach is holistic. Hence, the book speaks to designers, usability specialists, the HCI community, product managers, and business executives. There is an emphasis on balancing the back-end concern with usability and engineering excellence (getting the design right) with an up-front investment in sketching and ideation (getting the right design). Overall, the objective is to build the notion of informed design: molding emerging technology into a form that serves our society and reflects its values.

Grounded in both practice and scientific research, Bill Buxton’s engaging work aims to spark the imagination while encouraging the use of new techniques, breathing new life into user experience design.

  • Covers sketching and early prototyping design methods suitable for dynamic product capabilities: cell phones that communicate with each other and other embedded systems, "smart" appliances, and things you only imagine in your dreams
  • Thorough coverage of the design sketching method which helps easily build experience prototypes—without the effort of engineering prototypes which are difficult to abandon
  • Reaches out to a range of designers, including user interface designers, industrial designers, software engineers, usability engineers, product managers, and others
  • Full of case studies, examples, exercises, and projects, and access to video clips that demonstrate the principles and methods
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Additional Information

Publisher
Morgan Kaufmann
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Published on
Jul 28, 2010
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Pages
448
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ISBN
9780080552903
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Language
English
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Genres
Computers / Human-Computer Interaction (HCI)
Computers / Software Development & Engineering / Systems Analysis & Design
Technology & Engineering / Technical & Manufacturing Industries & Trades
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Spaces of Interaction, Places for Experience is a book about Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), interaction design (ID) and user experience (UX) in the age of ubiquitous computing. The book explores interaction and experience through the different spaces that contribute to interaction until it arrives at an understanding of the rich and complex places for experience that will be the focus of the next period for interaction design. The book begins by looking at the multilayered nature of interaction and UX—not just with new technologies, but with technologies that are embedded in the world. People inhabit a medium, or rather many media, which allow them to extend themselves, physically, mentally, and emotionally in many directions. The medium that people inhabit includes physical and semiotic material that combine to create user experiences. People feel more or less present in these media and more or less engaged with the content of the media. From this understanding of people in media, the book explores some philosophical and practical issues about designing interactions. The book journeys through the design of physical space, digital space, information space, conceptual space and social space. It explores concepts of space and place, digital ecologies, information architecture, conceptual blending and technology spaces at work and in the home. It discusses navigation of spaces and how people explore and find their way through environments. Finally the book arrives at the concept of a blended space where the physical and digital are tightly interwoven and people experience the blended space as a whole. The design of blended spaces needs to be driven by an understanding of the correspondences between the physical and the digital, by an understanding of conceptual blending and by the desire to design at a human scale. There is no doubt that HCI and ID are changing. The design of “microinteractions” remains important, but there is a bigger picture to consider. UX is spread across devices, over time and across physical spaces. The commingling of the physical and the digital in blended spaces leads to new social spaces and new conceptual spaces. UX concerns the navigation of these spaces as much as it concerns the design of buttons and screens for apps. By taking a spatial perspective on interaction, the book provides new insights into the evolving nature of interaction design.
A proposal to redefine design in a way that not only challenges the field's dominant paradigms but also changes the practice of design itself.

In Critical Fabulations, Daniela Rosner proposes redefining design as investigative and activist, personal and culturally situated, responsive and responsible. Challenging the field's dominant paradigms and reinterpreting its history, Rosner wants to change the way we historicize the practice, reworking it from the inside. Focusing on the development of computational systems, she takes on powerful narratives of innovation and technology shaped by the professional expertise that has become integral to the field's mounting status within the new industrial economy. To do so, she intervenes in legacies of design, expanding what is considered “design” to include long-silenced narratives of practice, and enhancing existing design methodologies based on these rediscovered inheritances. Drawing on discourses of feminist technoscience, she examines craftwork's contributions to computing innovation—how craftwork becomes hardware manufacturing, and how hardware manufacturing becomes craftwork. She reclaims, for example, NASA's “Little Old Ladies,” the women who built information storage for the Apollo missions by weaving wires through magnetized metal rings.

Mixing history, theory, personal experience, and case studies, Rosner reweaves fibers of technoscience by slowly reworking the methods and margins of design. She suggests critical fabulations as ways of telling stories that awaken alternative histories, and offers a set of techniques and orientations for fabulating its future. Critical Fabulations shows how design's hidden inheritances open different possibilities for practice.

Design Research Through Practice: From the Lab, Field, and Showroom focuses on one type of contemporary design research known as constructive design research. It looks at three approaches to constructive design research: Lab, Field, and Showroom. The book shows how theory, research practice, and the social environment create commonalities between these approaches. It illustrates how one can successfully integrate design and research based on work carried out in industrial design and interaction design.

The book begins with an overview of the rise of constructive design research, as well as constructive research programs and methodologies. It then describes the logic of studying design in the laboratory, design ethnography and field work, and the origins of the Showroom and its foundation on art and design rather than on science or the social sciences. It also discusses the theoretical background of constructive design research, along with modeling and prototyping of design items. Finally, it considers recent work in Lab that focuses on action and the body instead of thinking and knowing.

Many kinds of designers and people interested in design will find this book extremely helpful.

Gathers design research experts from traditional lab science, social science, art, industrial design, UX and HCI to lend tested practices and how they can be used in a variety of design projectsProvides a multidisciplinary story of the whole design process, with proven and teachable techniques that can solve both academic and practical problemsPresents key examples illustrating how research is applied and vignettes summarizing the key how-to details of specific projects
Integrated Design of Multiscale, Multifunctional Materials and Products is the first of its type to consider not only design of materials, but concurrent design of materials and products. In other words, materials are not just selected on the basis of properties, but the composition and/or microstructure iw designed to satisfy specific ranged sets of performance requirements. This book presents the motivation for pursuing concurrent design of materials and products, thoroughly discussing the details of multiscale modeling and multilevel robust design and provides details of the design methods/strategies along with selected examples of designing material attributes for specified system performance. It is intended as a monograph to serve as a foundational reference for instructors of courses at the senior and introductory graduate level in departments of materials science and engineering, mechanical engineering, aerospace engineering and civil engineering who are interested in next generation systems-based design of materials.First of its kind to consider not only design of materials, but concurrent design of materials and productsTreatment of uncertainty via robust design of materialsIntegrates the "materials by design approach" of Olson/Ques Tek LLC with the "materials selection" approach of Ashby/GrantaDistinquishes the processes of concurrent design of materials and products as an overall systems design problem from the field of multiscale modelingSystematic mathematical algorithms and methods are introduced for robust design of materials, rather than ad hoc heuristics--it is oriented towards a true systems approach to design of materials and products
Despite all of the UI toolkits available today, it's still not easy to design good application interfaces. This bestselling book is one of the few reliable sources to help you navigate through the maze of design options. By capturing UI best practices and reusable ideas as design patterns, Designing Interfaces provides solutions to common design problems that you can tailor to the situation at hand.

This updated edition includes patterns for mobile apps and social media, as well as web applications and desktop software. Each pattern contains full-color examples and practical design advice that you can use immediately. Experienced designers can use this guide as a sourcebook of ideas; novices will find a roadmap to the world of interface and interaction design.

Design engaging and usable interfaces with more confidence and less guessworkLearn design concepts that are often misunderstood, such as affordances, visual hierarchy, navigational distance, and the use of colorGet recommendations for specific UI patterns, including alternatives and warnings on when not to use themMix and recombine UI ideas as you see fitPolish the look and feel of your interfaces with graphic design principles and patterns

"Anyone who's serious about designing interfaces should have this book on their shelf for reference. It's the most comprehensive cross-platform examination of common interface patterns anywhere."--Dan Saffer, author of Designing Gestural Interfaces (O'Reilly) and Designing for Interaction (New Riders)

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