Hiking the Pack Line: Moving from Grief to a Joyful Life

Pearlsong Press
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Before Bonnie Shapbell's husband died, he made her promise she would be OK. She kept that promise, rebuilding a joyful life without him while cherishing her memories. Now she offers a helping hand to those on a similar journey. Hiking the Pack Line provides practical advice and a workbook section for those who want to create—or re-create—lives that nourish them after devastating loss. Foreword by clinical psychologist & publisher Peggy Elam, Ph.D.
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About the author

Bonnie Shapbell grew up in South Jersey in the 1950s. Her parents placed a high value on education and encouraged Bonnie and her older brother, Charles, to be independent and to think for themselves. After receiving a bachelor of science degree in mathematics, Bonnie became a software engineer. For her 50th birthday she earned a master of science degree in computer science.

Bonnie met Jan Shapbell when she was 30 and he was 35. They quickly became great friends and life partners. They shared common interests such as sports, travel, art, camping, and great conversation, as well as complementary strengths—Bonnie was a good breadwinner and bookkeeper and Jan was a creative cook and thrifty shopper. He had the vision of an artist, and she had the practical nature that brought his vision to reality.

Before Jan died in January 2004, Bonnie had promised him she would be OK. After his death, she actively worked to rebuild her life. She received help on the journey from family, friends, professionals, books, and even strangers.

On a hiking trip, experienced hikers helped Bonnie over rough places in the trail. It reminded her that we all have strengths and weaknesses. Everyone needs some help sometime, and we can all offer help to someone else.

Now Bonnie is the experienced “hiker.” She is standing along the trail of life between grief and a rebuilt joyful life, offering her advice—and this book—to those struggling with loss.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Pearlsong Press
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Published on
Mar 1, 2013
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Pages
166
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ISBN
9781597190688
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Language
English
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Genres
Self-Help / Death, Grief, Bereavement
Self-Help / Personal Growth / Happiness
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Over 1 million copies sold

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#1 New York Times best-seller with more than 11 million copies sold and Amazon’s #17 best-selling book of all time. Heaven Is for Real was the best-selling non-fiction book of 2011 as reported by Nielsen’s Bookscan, and was developed as a major motion picture by Sony in 2014.

“Do you remember the hospital, Colton?” Sonja said. “Yes, mommy, I remember,” he said. “That’s where the angels sang to me.”

When Colton Burpo made it through an emergency appendectomy, his family was overjoyed at his miraculous survival. What they weren’t expecting, though, was the story that emerged in the months that followed—a story as beautiful as it was extraordinary, detailing their little boy’s trip to heaven and back.

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Heaven Is for Real will forever change the way you think of eternity, offering the chance to see, and believe, like a child.

Continue the Burpos story in Heaven Changes Everything: The Rest of Our Story. Heaven Is for Real also is available in Spanish, El cielo es real.

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