Why Mexicans Think & Behave the Way They Do!

Cultural-Insight Books
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A Cultural-Inside Guide for Businessmen & Travelers: Mexico's traditional values and morals were forged in a caldron of aggressive religious intolerance, corruption, racism, male chauvinism, and an elitist political system that connived with the Church to keep ordinary people ignorant and powerless, and deny them the most basic human rights. But the reality of Mexico has always been obscured behind a variety of masks-of piety, pride, courage, gaiety, indifference and stoicism. In this provocative and insightful book internationally known author Boye Lafayette De Mente goes behind the masks that have long obscured Mexico to reveal the cultural influences that created the character and personality of Mexicans, and provides guidelines for dealing with them.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Cultural-Insight Books
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Published on
Jun 30, 2005
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Pages
140
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ISBN
9780914778561
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Workplace Culture
History / Latin America / Mexico
Travel / Mexico
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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The Deluxe Edition of Leaders Eat Last, now with an expanded chapter and appendix on leading millennials, includes over 30 minutes of exclusive video and 30 minutes of audio of Simon Sinek. The acclaimed, bestselling author of Start With Why and Together is Better delves deeper into book’s themes and shares additional examples and insights.
 
Imagine a world where almost everyone wakes up inspired to go to work, feels trusted and valued during the day, then returns home feeling fulfilled. This is not a crazy, idealized notion. Today, in many successful organizations, great leaders create environments in which people naturally work together to do remarkable things. 

In his work with organizations around the world, Simon Sinek noticed that some teams trust each other so deeply that they would literally put their lives on the line for each other. Other teams, no matter what incentives are offered, are doomed to infighting, fragmentation and failure. Why?

The answer became clear during a conversation with a Marine Corps general. "Officers eat last," he said. Sinek watched as the most junior Marines ate first while the most senior Marines took their place at the back of the line. What's symbolic in the chow hall is deadly serious on the battlefield: Great leaders sacrifice their own comfort--even their own survival--for the good of those in their care.
     
Too many workplaces are driven by cynicism, paranoia, and self-interest. But the best ones foster trust and cooperation because their leaders build what Sinek calls a "Circle of Safety" that separates the security inside the team from the challenges outside.

Sinek illustrates his ideas with fascinating true stories that range from the military to big business, from government to investment banking.
The Mexico Reader is a vivid introduction to muchos Méxicos—the many Mexicos, or the many varied histories and cultures that comprise contemporary Mexico. Unparalleled in scope and written for the traveler, student, and expert alike, the collection offers a comprehensive guide to the history and culture of Mexico—including its difficult, uneven modernization; the ways the country has been profoundly shaped not only by Mexicans but also by those outside its borders; and the extraordinary economic, political, and ideological power of the Roman Catholic Church. The book looks at what underlies the chronic instability, violence, and economic turmoil that have characterized periods of Mexico’s history while it also celebrates the country’s rich cultural heritage.

A diverse collection of more than eighty selections, The Mexico Reader brings together poetry, folklore, fiction, polemics, photoessays, songs, political cartoons, memoirs, satire, and scholarly writing. Many pieces are by Mexicans, and a substantial number appear for the first time in English. Works by Octavio Paz and Carlos Fuentes are included along with pieces about such well-known figures as the larger-than-life revolutionary leaders Pancho Villa and Emiliano Zapata; there is also a comminiqué from a more recent rebel, Subcomandante Marcos. At the same time, the book highlights the perspectives of many others—indigenous peoples, women, politicians, patriots, artists, soldiers, rebels, priests, workers, peasants, foreign diplomats, and travelers.

The Mexico Reader explores what it means to be Mexican, tracing the history of Mexico from pre-Columbian times through the country’s epic revolution (1910–17) to the present day. The materials relating to the latter half of the twentieth century focus on the contradictions and costs of postrevolutionary modernization, the rise of civil society, and the dynamic cross-cultural zone marked by the two thousand-mile Mexico-U.S. border. The editors have divided the book into several sections organized roughly in chronological order and have provided brief historical contexts for each section. They have also furnished a lengthy list of resources about Mexico, including websites and suggestions for further reading.

FOR PARENTS, TEACHERS, PRETEENS & TEENS: Japan's famous samurai warriors, who ruled the country from 1192 until 1868, were one of the most remarkable groups of people the world has ever seen. Their skills with the sword and other weapons of war have seldom been equaled and never surpassed. During the latter centuries of the samurai reign their training went beyond the martial arts to include such cultural pursuits as poetry, painting, calligraphy, history, philosophy and human behavior. Schooling in the skills and knowledge necessary to produce a samurai began in early childhood, and was a lifelong effort. Samurai Principles & Practices That Will Help Preteens & Teens in School, Sports, Social Activities & Choosing Careers, by internationally known Japanologist and author Boy Lafayette De Mente, identifies the principles and practices that made up the educational and training process of samurai youths. The book covers all of the basics of the samurai training-setting goals, discipline, diligence, perseverance, respect, personal appearance, keeping things in order, using intuitive and emotional intelligence, and tapping into cosmic power. De Mente says that training in karate, kendo (the way of the sword) and meditation are paths to learning the skills, morality and motivation that made the samurai so successful, and recommends that this training be incorporated into the educational system of Western countries. An intriguing handbook for success that should especially appeal to the video game generation...
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