Introduction to Emergency Management: Edition 2

CRC Press
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Emergency management university programs have experienced dramatic and exponential growth over the last twelve years. This new, fully updated edition introduces majors and minors to the field and provides content accessible to those students taking introductory emergency management courses. The book’s student-centered focus looks at the regional, state, and local level response, as well as some of the often misunderstood or overlooked social aspects of disasters. Real-world cases are described throughout including considerations of international emergency management and disasters alongside features from former students now working as professionals in the field of emergency management.
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About the author

Brenda Phillips, Ph.D., is the Associate Dean and Professor of Sociology at Ohio University in Chillicothe. She is the author of Disaster Recovery, Introduction to Emergency Management, Qualitative Disaster Research and Mennonite Disaster Service. She has co-edited Social Vulnerability to Disasters and Women and Disasters: from theory to practice. Dr. Phillips is the recipient of the Blanchard Award for excellence in emergency management education and the Myers Award for work on the effects of disasters on women. She was inducted into the International Women’s Hall of Fame for Emergency Management and Homeland Security in 2013. She has been funded multiple times by the National Science Foundation with publications in multiple peer-reviewed journals. Dr. Phillips has been invited to teach, consult, or present in New Zealand, Australia, Germany, India, Costa Rica, Mexico, Canada, Sweden, and the People’s Republic of China. She is a graduate of Bluffton University (Ohio) and The Ohio State University. Locally, Dr. Phillips is a member of the Ross County Local Emergency Planning Committee, the Ross County Safety Council Board of Directors, and the Chillicothe Rotary. She recently led efforts to re-establish the OUC Emergency Response Training Center for widespread and affordable local use by emergency responders.

Dave Neal, Ph.D.,

is a sociologist serving as a professor with the Fire and emergency Management Program in the Department of Political Science at Oklahoma State University. He has studied a wide range of events (e.g., blizzards, tornadoes, floods, hurricanes, earthquakes, hazardous materials, tsunamis) throughout the United States, and also in Sweden and India. Such organizations as FEMA, NASA, the National Science Foundation, and the American Red Cross among others have funded his research. He taught his first class on disasters in 1979 at the University of Evansville. In 1989, he joined the Institute of Emergency Administration Planning at the University of North Texas, where he became the first full time Ph.D. faculty member with the first emergency management degree program and later served as its director. He has published academic articles on developing emergency management degree programs and using virtual teaching environments for teaching emergency management. He has also served as a consultant for universities starting undergraduate and graduate degrees in emergency management and fire administration. In 2015, he received the Blanchard Award for excellence in emergency management education. He has also served as a Red Cross disaster volunteer and as Chapter Chair of the Denton County Red Cross. He received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Bowling Green State University and his Ph.D. in sociology from The Ohio State University, where he also served as a research assistant with the Disaster Research Center. His current interests focus on crisis and disaster research in Sweden, and writing on the sociology of science of disaster research.

Gary Webb, PhD

, is a professor in the Emergency Administration and Planning (EADP) program at the University of North Texas. Previously he was a faculty member in the sociology department at Oklahoma State University, where he received the Regents Distinguished Teaching Award. He holds a PhD from the University of Delaware, where he worked at the Disaster Research Center, and he specializes in the study of organizational preparedness for and response to extreme events. His research has been supported by various agencies, including the U.S. National Science Foundation, and it has appeared in a variety of professional journals, including the International Journal of Mass Emergencies and Disasters, International Journal of Emergency Management, Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, Natural Hazards Review, and Environmental Hazards. His research has also been featured in national media outlets, including the Los Angeles Times, Newsday, and Christian Science Monitor. He has been invited to teach or present his research to international audiences in Denmark, France, South Korea, The Netherlands, and Turkey.
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Additional Information

Publisher
CRC Press
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Published on
Dec 8, 2016
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Pages
442
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ISBN
9781315394688
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Language
English
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Genres
Law / Forensic Science
Political Science / Security (National & International)
Social Science / Disasters & Disaster Relief
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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The ten Galilean Lie point symmetries of the fundamental action discussed in this book give rise to the conservation of energy, momentum, angular momentum and center of mass conservation laws via Noether’s first theorem. The advected invariants are related to fluid relabeling symmetries – so-called diffeomorphisms associated with the Lagrangian map – and are obtained by applying the Euler-Poincare approach to Noether’s second theorem.

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A range of examples is used to illustrate topological invariants in MHD and fluid dynamics, including the Hopf invariant, the Calugareanu invariant, the Taylor magnetic helicity reconnection hypothesis for magnetic fields in highly conducting plasmas, and the magnetic helicity of Alfvén simple waves, MHD topological solitons, and the Parker Archimedean spiral magnetic field. The Lagrangian map is used to obtain a class of solutions for incompressible MHD. The Aharonov-Bohm interpretation of magnetic helicity and cross helicity is discussed. In closing, examples of magnetosonic N-waves are used to illustrate the role of the wave number and group velocity concepts for MHD waves.

This self-contained and pedagogical guide to the fundamentals will benefit postgraduate-level newcomers and seasoned researchers alike.

The 2010 Haiti and Chili earthquakes, the 2010 BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, and the 2011 Fukushima earthquake and tsunami in Japan are but a few examples of recent catastrophic events that continue to reveal how social structure and roles produce extensive human suffering and differential impacts on individuals and communities. These events bring social vulnerability to the forefront in considering how disasters unfold, clearly revealing that disasters are not created from the physical event alone. Equally important, people—even those considered vulnerable—respond in innovative and resilient ways that unveil the strength of human ingenuity and spirit. It is not a foregone conclusion that a hazard event, even a large one, will result in catastrophic loss.

This updated second edition of Social Vulnerability to Disasters focuses on the social construction of disasters, demonstrating how the characteristics of an event are not the only reason that tragedies unfurl. By carefully examining and documenting social vulnerabilities throughout the disaster management cycle, the book remains essential to emergency management professionals, the independent volunteer sector, homeland security, and related social science fields, including public policy, sociology, geography, political science, urban and regional planning, and public health. The new edition is fully updated, more international in scope, and incorporates significant recent disaster events. It also includes new case studies to illustrate important concepts.

By understanding the nuances of social vulnerability and how these vulnerabilities compound one another, we can take steps to reduce the danger to at-risk populations and strengthen community resilience overall.

Features and Highlights from the Second Edition:

Contains contributions from leading scholars, professionals, and academics, who draw on their areas of expertise to examine vulnerable populations Incorporates disaster case studies to illustrate concepts, relevant and seminal literature, and the most recent data available In addition to highlighting the U.S. context, integrates a global approach and includes numerous international case studies Highlights recent policy changes and current disaster management approaches Infuses the concept of community resilience and building capacity throughout the text Includes new chapters that incorporate additional perspectives on social vulnerability Instructor’s guide, PowerPoint® slides, and test bank available with qualifying course adoption
How would you go about rebuilding a technological society from scratch?

If our technological society collapsed tomorrow what would be the one book you would want to press into the hands of the postapocalyptic survivors? What crucial knowledge would they need to survive in the immediate aftermath and to rebuild civilization as quickly as possible?

Human knowledge is collective, distributed across the population. It has built on itself for centuries, becoming vast and increasingly specialized. Most of us are ignorant about the fundamental principles of the civilization that supports us, happily utilizing the latest—or even the most basic—technology without having the slightest idea of why it works or how it came to be. If you had to go back to absolute basics, like some sort of postcataclysmic Robinson Crusoe, would you know how to re-create an internal combustion engine, put together a microscope, get metals out of rock, or even how to produce food for yourself?


Lewis Dartnell proposes that the key to preserving civilization in an apocalyptic scenario is to provide a quickstart guide, adapted to cataclysmic circumstances. The Knowledge describes many of the modern technologies we employ, but first it explains the fundamentals upon which they are built. Every piece of technology rests on an enormous support network of other technologies, all interlinked and mutually dependent. You can’t hope to build a radio, for example, without understanding how to acquire the raw materials it requires, as well as generate the electricity needed to run it. But Dartnell doesn’t just provide specific information for starting over; he also reveals the greatest invention of them all—the phenomenal knowledge-generating machine that is the scientific method itself. 


The Knowledge is a brilliantly original guide to the fundamentals of science and how it built our modern world.

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