The Father

Combustible Books
1
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What is the fate of America and each of us as individuals? As a literary fiction, "The Father" addresses these vital questions as it traces four generations of the Whitaker family through the evolution of modernity. Amongst modesty of private lives in 1926 rural America, John Whitaker is born to a conflation of events, signifying paths crossed by this world with another. Conflicts in John’s family express widening chasms between changing views - from belonging to autonomy, religious belief to skepticism, self-sacrifice to self-indulgence. Eventually, John has a son of his own, Morgan. Morgan arrives in a materialistic world of public lives, captivated by potentials for greatness during America’s ascendancy. Morgan also absorbs social movements against authority to wage combat with his father John as he watches America abandon reason to become ever more dogmatic. Realizing battles with his father were an impersonation of present fashion, history will not be rectified as John is dead. Since Morgan cannot correct the past he sets out to fix the future in a fistfight with society. Failing to change the world, Morgan spends his last dollar on an adventure to the Yucatan where fate provides a woman, commencing the love story of his life. Morgan tries to inoculate their son against the ills of humanity with the wonders of nature and ruins of man, but Morgan's son finds hope in the human race. Convinced he’s found salvation for people and their civilizations, Morgan’s son takes his message to a greater audience than his father, navigating a second Axial Age, fiercely attacked by Morgan on a global stage during The Great Upheaval of 2057.
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About the author

Award winning author, Brett Williams spent his career as a physicist in engineering and applied research in Dallas, Houston, and Southern California. He is a landscape oil painter and frequent backcountry hiker. He left physics to focus on writing, painting and travel. The Father is his debut novel, and 2014 Global eBook Award winner in New Adult Fiction. More about Williams and The Father can be found at www.TheFatherTrilogy.com.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Combustible Books
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Published on
Mar 27, 2014
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Pages
315
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Historical
Fiction / Political
Fiction / Sagas
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Unable to convince her husband they are ready to become parents, trophy wife Erika decides to buy a puppy. She heads into rural Missouri in search of a Yorkie pup, only to find more than dogs caged in the barn of a secluded puppy mill...

After the death of her mother, Bobbie Jean finds herself living with her aunt and uncle at their rural farm. Without many options, she begins to sell her body to anyone to turn a quick buck. But when she discovers Uncle Levi's dirty secret in the barn, Bobby Jean must decide whether to join the family business.

"If you like hardcore, and I mean Hardcore with a capital 'H,' horror with purpose, and are able to find the value in movies like Hostel and can appreciate the tenor of stories like American Psycho, then you will absolutely love this book." —Cheryl Anne Gardner, POD People

"This was a fun book! Okay, so I know it was horror and I don't know if I'm supposed to think it was fun, but it was. It has some twists and turns that are expected, but the author takes these expectations and bends them into something else. Williams really owns them. He does such a wonderful job of allowing the characters to speak for themselves and by the end of the book, the suspension of disbelief is still gnawing at your brain. I would definitely rec it." —Saranna DeWylde, author of How to Lose a Demon in 10 Days

"Brett Williams is a writer who hooks the reader from the first sentence and holds that interest until the last. With Williams, you are guaranteed to be entertained." —Mark Allan Gunnells, author of The Quarry

"Bottom line, Family Business will not be for everyone, but for those with a literary taste for this kind of vicious, bloody, no-holds-barred horror, it's practically a must-read." —Mark Allen, author of The Assassin's Prayer
Credit and debt appear to be natural, permanent facets of Americans' lives, but a debt-based economy and debt-financed lifestyles are actually recent inventions. In 1951 Diners Club issued a plastic card that enabled patrons to pay for their meals at select New York City restaurants at the end of each month. Soon other "charge cards" (as they were then known) offered the convenience for travelers throughout the United States to pay for hotels, food, and entertainment on credit. In the 1970s the advent of computers and the deregulation of banking created an explosion in credit card use—and consumer debt. With gigantic national banks and computer systems that allowed variable interest rates, consumer screening, mass mailings, and methods to discipline slow payers with penalties and fees, middle-class Americans experienced a sea change in their lives.

Given the enormous profits from issuing credit, banks and chain stores used aggressive marketing to reach Americans experiencing such crises as divorce or unemployment, to help them make ends meet or to persuade them that they could live beyond their means. After banks exhausted the profits from this group of people, they moved into the market for college credit cards and student loans and then into predatory lending (through check-cashing stores and pawnshops) to the poor. In 2003, Americans owed nearly $8 trillion in consumer debt, amounting to 130 percent of their average disposable income. The role of credit and debt in people's lives is one of the most important social and economic issues of our age.

Brett Williams provides a sobering and frank investigation of the credit industry and how it came to dominate the lives of most Americans by propelling the social changes that are enacted when an economy is based on debt. Williams argues that credit and debt act to obscure, reproduce, and exacerbate other inequalities. It is in the best interest of the banks, corporations, and their shareholders to keep consumer debt at high levels. By targeting low-income and young people who would not be eligible for credit in other businesses, these companies are able quickly to gain a stranglehold on the finances of millions. Throughout, Williams provides firsthand accounts of how Americans from all socioeconomic levels use credit. These vignettes complement the history and technical issues of the credit industry, including strategies people use to manage debt, how credit functions in their lives, how they understand their own indebtedness, and the sometimes tragic impact of massive debt on people's lives.

Unable to convince her husband they are ready to become parents, trophy wife Erika decides to buy a puppy. She heads into rural Missouri in search of a Yorkie pup, only to find more than dogs caged in the barn of a secluded puppy mill...

After the death of her mother, Bobbie Jean finds herself living with her aunt and uncle at their rural farm. Without many options, she begins to sell her body to anyone to turn a quick buck. But when she discovers Uncle Levi's dirty secret in the barn, Bobby Jean must decide whether to join the family business.

"If you like hardcore, and I mean Hardcore with a capital 'H,' horror with purpose, and are able to find the value in movies like Hostel and can appreciate the tenor of stories like American Psycho, then you will absolutely love this book." —Cheryl Anne Gardner, POD People

"This was a fun book! Okay, so I know it was horror and I don't know if I'm supposed to think it was fun, but it was. It has some twists and turns that are expected, but the author takes these expectations and bends them into something else. Williams really owns them. He does such a wonderful job of allowing the characters to speak for themselves and by the end of the book, the suspension of disbelief is still gnawing at your brain. I would definitely rec it." —Saranna DeWylde, author of How to Lose a Demon in 10 Days

"Brett Williams is a writer who hooks the reader from the first sentence and holds that interest until the last. With Williams, you are guaranteed to be entertained." —Mark Allan Gunnells, author of The Quarry

"Bottom line, Family Business will not be for everyone, but for those with a literary taste for this kind of vicious, bloody, no-holds-barred horror, it's practically a must-read." —Mark Allen, author of The Assassin's Prayer
Credit and debt appear to be natural, permanent facets of Americans' lives, but a debt-based economy and debt-financed lifestyles are actually recent inventions. In 1951 Diners Club issued a plastic card that enabled patrons to pay for their meals at select New York City restaurants at the end of each month. Soon other "charge cards" (as they were then known) offered the convenience for travelers throughout the United States to pay for hotels, food, and entertainment on credit. In the 1970s the advent of computers and the deregulation of banking created an explosion in credit card use—and consumer debt. With gigantic national banks and computer systems that allowed variable interest rates, consumer screening, mass mailings, and methods to discipline slow payers with penalties and fees, middle-class Americans experienced a sea change in their lives.

Given the enormous profits from issuing credit, banks and chain stores used aggressive marketing to reach Americans experiencing such crises as divorce or unemployment, to help them make ends meet or to persuade them that they could live beyond their means. After banks exhausted the profits from this group of people, they moved into the market for college credit cards and student loans and then into predatory lending (through check-cashing stores and pawnshops) to the poor. In 2003, Americans owed nearly $8 trillion in consumer debt, amounting to 130 percent of their average disposable income. The role of credit and debt in people's lives is one of the most important social and economic issues of our age.

Brett Williams provides a sobering and frank investigation of the credit industry and how it came to dominate the lives of most Americans by propelling the social changes that are enacted when an economy is based on debt. Williams argues that credit and debt act to obscure, reproduce, and exacerbate other inequalities. It is in the best interest of the banks, corporations, and their shareholders to keep consumer debt at high levels. By targeting low-income and young people who would not be eligible for credit in other businesses, these companies are able quickly to gain a stranglehold on the finances of millions. Throughout, Williams provides firsthand accounts of how Americans from all socioeconomic levels use credit. These vignettes complement the history and technical issues of the credit industry, including strategies people use to manage debt, how credit functions in their lives, how they understand their own indebtedness, and the sometimes tragic impact of massive debt on people's lives.

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