Enough Is Enough: A Student Affairs Perspective on Preparedness and Response to a Campus Shooting

Stylus Publishing, LLC.
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Are your violence prevention and mental health efforts on campus coordinated?

Are all your campus professionals aware of the system for reporting information about students who may be in distress or at-risk for harming themselves or others?

Is the information reviewed and acted on?


Recent campus crises have highlighted that campus administrators will be judged by three things: What the campus was doing before the crisis, its immediate response during the crisis, and the follow-up after the crisis.

Born out of the call by Virginia Tech’s Zenobia Hikes for urgent action to stem the tide of societal violence, and the NASPA “Enough is Enough” campaign (www.EnoughisEnoughcampaign.org) that she inspired, this book provides guidance on how to be proactive in preventing violence, and be prepared to provide a comprehensive response to a crisis.

Enough is Enough presents first-hand accounts and experienced counsel from professionals who have lived through a violent incident, and continue to deal with its aftermath. They cover violence, suicide prevention, and mental health promotion in an integrated way, and offer a comprehensive plan to create a campus-wide system for collecting information about students at-risk for self-harm or violence toward others.

The authors describe how to develop university-wide emergency plans, using the National Incident Management System template and involving a wide spectrum of campus services; how to create crisis response teams and victim liaison programs; offer recommendations about communication and the management of information; and address institutionally-appropriate and sensitive ways to achieve healing and recovery.

The book is addressed to administrators, student affairs, services and mental health professionals, and counselors, on all the nation’s campuses, elementary through post-secondary.

A Joint ACPA & NASPA Publication
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About the author

Brian O. Hemphill joined West Virginia State University in July 2012 as the University’s 10th president. His emphasis since arriving on campus is threefold: to establish a commitment to excellence, to create a culture of accountability and to be student-centered in every process at State.

President Hemphill has a strong background in student advocacy, advancing diversity and equity and establishing a solid commitment to shared governance on campus. He has contributed to numerous journal articles and professional presentations in the areas of leadership, crisis management, ethics, and diversity. Most recently, Dr. Hemphill was the editor of the monograph, Enough is Enough: A Student Affairs Perspective on Preparedness and Response to a Campus Shooting. He has fulfilled various leadership roles within the Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education (NASPA), which named him a Pillar of the Profession in 2009.

President Hemphill came to WVSU following an eight-year tenure as Vice President for Student Affairs & Enrollment Management and Associate Professor, at Northern Illinois University. Prior to joining NIU, he served as an associate vice chancellor and dean of students at the University of Arkansas-Fayetteville, associate dean of students at University of North Carolina-Wilmington, assistant dean of students at Cornell College, and coordinator of minority recruitment and retention at Iowa State University.

President Hemphill earned a Ph.D. in Higher Education Administration from the University of Iowa, a Master of Science degree in Journalism and Mass Communication from Iowa State University of Science and Technology, and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Organizational Communication from St. Augustine’s College.

Brandi Hephner LaBanc was appointed Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs in July 2012 at Ole Miss, providing leadership and direction for all of the departments encompassed by the Division of Student Affairs. She also serves as a faculty member in the Higher Education program in the department of Leadership and Counselor Education.

Dr. Hephner LaBanc earned her bachelor’s degree in Accounting at the University of Akron, her master’s degree in Higher Education Administration and Student personnel at Kent State University, and her doctoral degree at Northern Illinois University in Adult and Higher Education.

Prior to coming to the University of Mississippi, Dr. Hephner LaBanc served Northern Illinois University as their Associate Vice President in the Division of Student Affairs and Enrollment Management as well as the Assistant Vice President for Planning and Operations. She has served students in multiple administrative roles at Arizona State University, University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Baldwin-Wallace College, and University of Akron.

A respected scholar and consultant in the field of campus crisis management, her research also focuses on preparation of student affairs professionals and transition issues for graduate students. Among her honors and special recognitions, Dr. Hephner LaBanc was named Alumna of the Year at Kent State University and recognized for her outstanding service by the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Stylus Publishing, LLC.
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Published on
Mar 12, 2012
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Pages
216
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ISBN
9781579225223
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / Educational Policy & Reform / School Safety
Education / Higher
Education / Violence & Harassment
Social Science / Violence in Society
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Gun violence – whether rampage shootings, homicides or suicides – is a potential reality all campuses have to face. This book provides leaders in higher education – and particularly those in student affairs – with data about past incidents, an analysis of trends, and background on the national debate about gun policies and how they impact colleges, state by state. It importantly raises issues about student psychological development, mental health, and the prevalence of alcohol and substance abuse on campus, to better inform discussion about allowing guns on campus and concealed carry. It concludes by sharing strategies for averting gun-related tragedies, and offering models for responding when they occur, based on lessons learned and best practices.

The book addresses concealed carry legislation and its impact on campus policies by state, examining the concerns of administrators as they discharge their duty of care to students and comply with legal and regulatory frameworks. Asking “Are our students developmentally ready to make a morally sophisticated, life-changing decision to use firearms in response to a real or perceived threat?”, it offers important perspectives and scientific data, so far absent from the debate, to shape the ongoing conversation with lawmakers and the public about what it takes to keep college communities safe.

In addressing risk and prevention, contributors cover the relationship between violence and mental health, and the need to establish comprehensive strategic plans and a preventative framework that promotes help-seeking for those in need before they reach the point of crisis, as well as a campus-wide risk assessment team, stressing the importance of cultivating a community-wide approach to campus safety by empowering members to report suspicious behavior. They also offer guidance on improving effective behavior intervention and case management processes.

The book concludes by outlining best practices, and providing guidance on developing an emergency plan, practicing and testing systems, and creating a robust communications strategy. Individual chapters focus on how small colleges with limited resources can develop effective plans into by partnering with local agencies; as well as on the steps that community colleges – who generally lack resident advisors and residential staff, and whose students are far more dispersed – can take to diminish risk and respond promptly and professionally to a crisis.

This is an essential guide for all higher education leaders concerned about preventing violence on our campuses, and a call to action.
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Gun violence – whether rampage shootings, homicides or suicides – is a potential reality all campuses have to face. This book provides leaders in higher education – and particularly those in student affairs – with data about past incidents, an analysis of trends, and background on the national debate about gun policies and how they impact colleges, state by state. It importantly raises issues about student psychological development, mental health, and the prevalence of alcohol and substance abuse on campus, to better inform discussion about allowing guns on campus and concealed carry. It concludes by sharing strategies for averting gun-related tragedies, and offering models for responding when they occur, based on lessons learned and best practices.

The book addresses concealed carry legislation and its impact on campus policies by state, examining the concerns of administrators as they discharge their duty of care to students and comply with legal and regulatory frameworks. Asking “Are our students developmentally ready to make a morally sophisticated, life-changing decision to use firearms in response to a real or perceived threat?”, it offers important perspectives and scientific data, so far absent from the debate, to shape the ongoing conversation with lawmakers and the public about what it takes to keep college communities safe.

In addressing risk and prevention, contributors cover the relationship between violence and mental health, and the need to establish comprehensive strategic plans and a preventative framework that promotes help-seeking for those in need before they reach the point of crisis, as well as a campus-wide risk assessment team, stressing the importance of cultivating a community-wide approach to campus safety by empowering members to report suspicious behavior. They also offer guidance on improving effective behavior intervention and case management processes.

The book concludes by outlining best practices, and providing guidance on developing an emergency plan, practicing and testing systems, and creating a robust communications strategy. Individual chapters focus on how small colleges with limited resources can develop effective plans into by partnering with local agencies; as well as on the steps that community colleges – who generally lack resident advisors and residential staff, and whose students are far more dispersed – can take to diminish risk and respond promptly and professionally to a crisis.

This is an essential guide for all higher education leaders concerned about preventing violence on our campuses, and a call to action.
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