Career As A Veterinarian: What They Do, How to Become One, and What the Future Holds!

KidLit-O
1
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A career as a veterinarianis an exciting one! But do you really know what it takes to become one? 

This book takes you inside the career and shows you the day and the life of a veterinarian. Inside you’ll learn what they do, what training is required, what the future holds, and how you can become one! 

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Additional Information

Publisher
KidLit-O
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Published on
Oct 9, 2013
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Pages
60
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ISBN
9781629171197
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Choosing what to do with your life begins with imagining yourself in a career. Using stories of real practitioners in the field, the Masters at Work series offers the opportunity to see through the eyes of someone who has mastered a profession and learn what the risks and rewards of a job really are.

According to a LinkedIn survey that polled 8,000 professionals, the second most popular childhood dream job for respondents was a veterinarian. It’s a career that appeals to many, due to its involvement with animals and association with helping and doing good. Still, much of the day-to-day elements of the job are not known by the wider public. This series, and individual guide, provides valuable and relevant information about what daily life for a professional veterinarian is like, and will be a vital resource for anyone interested in pursuing the path.

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Perception is one of the oldest and most deeply investigated topics in the field of psychology, and it is also raises some profound philosophical questions. It is concerned with how we use the information reaching our senses to guide and control our behaviour as well as to create our particular, subjective experiences of the surrounding world. In this Very Short Introduction, Brian J. Rogers discusses the philosophical question of what it means to perceive, as well as describing how we are able to perceive the particular characteristics of objects and scenes such as their lightness, colour, form, depth, and motion. What we perceive, however, does not always correspond to what exists in the world and, as Rogers shows, the study of illusions can be useful in telling us something about the nature and limitations of our perceptual processes. Rogers also explores perception from an evolutionary perspective, explaining how evolutionary pressures have shaped the perceptual systems of humans and other animals. He shows that perception is not necessarily a separate and independent process but rather part of a 'perceptual system', involving both the extraction of perceptual information and the control of action. Rogers goes on to cover the significant progress made recently in the understanding of perception through the use of precise and controlled psychophysical methods, single cell recordings, and imaging techniques. There have also been many insights from attempts to model perceptual processes in artificial systems. As Rogers shows, these attempts have revealed how difficult it is to programme machines to perform even the most simple of perceptual tasks that we take for granted. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.
Before there was television, before there were computers, before there was the Internet with its audio and video streaming, before there were cell phones, iPods, and iPads, there was radio. Beginning in the early 1920s, electrical wavesmysterious to manycould be sent from senders or transmitters into boxes called radios in peoples homes. Sometimes the boxes werent boxes at all. In radios earliest days, hobbyists built radios (called crystal sets) with wire and empty oatmeal boxes or similar materials. By 1930, radios were becoming massive pieces of wooden furniture proudly residing in living rooms. At first, the waves carried talks and music from transmitters in cities into radios nearby. But, in 1926, dependable chains or networks of radio stations were being put together with telephone wires, and people in many cities could listen to the same programs simultaneously. In the 1930s, local vocalists and other performers were being replaced on the air by network shows that informed, entertained, and enlightened. During the Great Depression, free entertainment coming over the radio helped ease evenings spent fretting over lack of employment and unpaid bills. Programs such as Fibber McGee and Molly and Jack Benny brought laughter into millions of homes. Suspense and similar shows inspired terror, and Dragnet and Your FBI in Peace and War brought mystery. As World War II neared, and all through the conflict, radio instantly brought into homes everywhere news of major and minor events. Because of radios immediacy, we learned, the same day, when Pearl Harbor was attacked, when Allied soldiers landed in France, and when surrender agreements were signed with Germany and Japan. In his book, Brian Rogers, in a collection of articles based on material he has researched and written for various radio hobby publications, introduces some of the events and personalities that made up the golden age of radio, roughly from 1930 to 1960, and the decade preceding when radio was taking its first electronic baby steps. He also shares his personal story with old-time radio and how, with warmly glowing vacuum tubes, his own hand-me-down radio brought friends to a boy who thought he had no friends.
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