Streetcars of America

Bloomsbury Publishing
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The handsome multicolored streetcar is a nostalgic icon of the some of the most romantic and heritage-rich locales in America, including San Francisco, New Orleans and Chicago, immortalised on stage and screen in classics including 'Meet Me In St Louis' and 'A Streetcar Named Desire'. Streetcars of America chronicles these vehicles from the earliest animal-drawn carriages to the height of their popularity in the 1920s, when there were more than 1,200 tram railways, to the turning of the tide in the mid-twentieth century when congestion and attacks from the automobile industry eventually pushed streetcars from most urban landscapes. But it also looks at the recent efforts to revive tram heritage that have led to vintage streetcars becoming a hip and environmentally-friendly daily commuter service, as well as tourist attraction, in more than thirty cities including Memphis and Washington DC.
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About the author

Brian Solomon is the author of more than 50 books on railroads. He was editor of Pacific RailNews and has contributed to numerous specialist magazines.

John Gruber is a renowned railroad photographer and is President of the Center for Railroad Photography & Art, Madison, Wisconsin.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Bloomsbury Publishing
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Published on
Jun 10, 2014
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Pages
64
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ISBN
9780747815242
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Americas (North, Central, South, West Indies)
History / Modern / 20th Century
History / United States / State & Local / General
Transportation / General
Transportation / Public Transportation
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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