Toll-Like Receptor Family Members and Their Ligands

Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology

Book 270
Springer Science & Business Media
Free sample

On occasion, the innate immune system is referred to as the "primitive" immune system. Perhaps this has dissuaded immu nologists from analyzing it as energetically as they have analyzed the adaptive immune system during the past two decades. But while its phylogenetic origins are indeed ancient, and though it is "of the first type", there is nothing crude, nothing unsophisti cated, and nothing "inferior" about innate immunity. On the contrary, the innate immune system has had time to achieve a level of refinement that is nothing short of dazzling, and a modicum of respect is at long last due. Any immune system has two cardinal functions. It must destroy a broad range of pathogens, and it must spare the host. The adaptive immune system has applied a modular solution to these problems. Each cell of the adaptive immune system is prescreened to eliminate those that would produce untoward interactions with self; each cell is pre-programmed to recognize a foreign epitope that the host might one day encounter. Hence, the duties of each individual lymphocyte are quite circumscribed.
Read more
Collapse
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Dec 6, 2012
Read more
Collapse
Pages
192
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9783642594304
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Best For
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
Medical / General
Medical / Immunology
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
An early view of eukaryotic chromosomes was that of static structures, which stored DNA not in use within a given cell type. It was thought that packaging of DNA into higher levels of chromatin structure would suffice to repress gene expression and that the challenge to the cell would be to rescue specific sequences from these structures. The exten sive packaging of inactive DNA was considered the primary difference between eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes and except for that point both would be similarly regulated by cis-acting sequences and trans acting factors. Our view of eukaryotic chromosomes has evolved dra matically over the last decade. The picture of chromosomes that is emerging is that of dynamic breathing organelles actively regulating the flow of genetic information from the genome. Indeed chromatin is so fluid that even maintaining gene quiescence is an active process and is tightly regulated. Chromatin dynamics is a consequence of protein complexes that modify histones, remove histone modifications, mobi lize nucleosomes or stabilize nucleosomes. Awide variety of such com plexes have now been described. Some are abundant and may play glo bal roles in chromosome fluidity and function. Others are more rare and specialized for specific functions at discreet loci. Moreover, several complexes share biochemical activities and genetic studies suggest overlapping functions in vivo. Many components of these complexes were first revealed in genetic screens, while others were discovered by novel cell biological or biochemical approaches.
How the Immune System Works has helped thousands of students understand what’s in their big, thick, immunology textbooks. In his book, Dr. Sompayrac cuts through the jargon and details to reveal, in simple language, the essence of this complex subject.

In fifteen easy-to-read chapters, featuring the humorous style and engaging analogies developed by Dr. Sompayrac, How the Immune System Works explains how the immune system players work together to protect us from disease – and, most importantly, why they do it this way.

Rigorously updated for this fifth edition, How the Immune System Works includes the latest information on subjects such as vaccines, the immunology of AIDS, and cancer. A highlight of this edition is a new chapter on the intestinal immune system – currently one of the hottest topics in immunology.

Whether you are completely new to immunology, or require a refresher, How the Immune System Works will provide you with a clear and engaging overview of this fascinating subject. But don’t take our word for it! Read what students have been saying about this classic book:

"What an exceptional book! It's clear you are in the hands of an expert."

"Possibly the Best Small Text of All Time!"

"This is a FUN book, and Lauren Sompayrac does a fantastic job of explaining the immune system using words that normal people can understand."

"Hands down the best immunology book I have read... a very enjoyable read."

"This is simply one of the best medical textbooks that I have ever read. Clear diagrams coupled with highly readable text make this whole subject easily understandable and engaging."


Now with a brand new website at www.wiley.com/go/sompayrac featuring Powerpoint files of the images from the book

©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.