Looking Out for Number Two: A Slightly Irreverent Guide to Poo, Gas, and Other Things That Come Out of Your Baby

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What to Expect When You're Expecting meets What's Your Poo Telling You? in this informative, entertaining, and practical guide to understanding your baby’s digestion.

Let’s face it: babies don’t do much. So when we want to know how a baby is feeling, we look at how they are eating, sleeping, and pooping. But baby digestion is a complicated landscape, and most parents struggle to interpret everything from burps and grunts to diapers and spit-up. In fact, for parents of newborns, digestive issues are one of the leading causes of pediatrician visits.

Enter Bryan Vartabedian, MD, one of America’s top pediatric gastroenterologists. In Looking Out for Number Two, Dr. Vartabedian draws on more than twenty years of experience as a doctor and father to present an insightful yet irreverent guide to newborn digestive health: what goes in, what comes out, and what it all means.

In this accessible, easy-to-use manual, Dr. Vartabedian tackles everything from standard questions about burping positions and bowel movements to hot button issues like the role of the microbiome in the development of allergies and the debate over breast milk versus formula. Throughout, he soothes parents’ concerns and answers their most urgent question: "Is this normal?"

Complete with illustrations, lively anecdotes, and a healthy dose of humor, Looking Out for Number Two is required reading for every new parent and is sure to become an instant classic.

 

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About the author

Bryan Vartabedian, MD, is a pediatric gastroenterologist at Texas Children’s Hospital in Houston, America’s largest children’s hospital. Beyond examining thousands of dirty diapers, he has made a life shaping practical solutions to the digestive health problems of children. He is the author of Colic Solved, and he lives in The Woodlands, Texas, with his wife, two children, and an Australian labradoodle.

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Additional Information

Publisher
HarperCollins
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Published on
May 23, 2017
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Pages
368
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ISBN
9780062464385
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Family & Relationships / Life Stages / Infants & Toddlers
Family & Relationships / Parenting / General
Medical / Pediatrics
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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