Human-computer Interface Design Guidelines

Intellect Books
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This text contains hundreds of practical guidelines and rules of thumb to aid software designers in developing user oriented human-computer interfaces, the author looks at software related design issues, although some guidelines on selection of input and output device hardware are included as well.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Intellect Books
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Published on
Dec 31, 1998
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Pages
236
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ISBN
9781871516548
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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This sweeping account begins in the 19th century, with the discovery of nuclear fission, and continues to World War Two and the Americans’ race to beat Hitler’s Nazis. That competition launched the Manhattan Project and the nearly overnight construction of a vast military-industrial complex that culminated in the fateful dropping of the first bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

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