How to Thrive as a Solo Librarian

Scarecrow Press
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How to Thrive as a Solo Librarian is a compilation of chapters by librarians offering advice to colleagues who must work alone or with very limited help. The contributors come from schools and colleges, special and corporate archives, public libraries, and seasoned LIS faculty across the United States and abroad who are familiar with the vigor, dedication, and creativity necessary for solo librarians.

As noted in the Foreword, "In many ways, solo librarianship demands more communication and collaboration than librarians might experience in larger multi-employee libraries." Despite the fact that most of the authors are currently working alone in their library or archives, they do not work in a vacuum. These chapters aim to help librarians thrive in the demanding environment that exists for the solo librarian. Topics covered include time management, community involvement, public relations and marketing, professional development, internet-based ideas, administrative tasks, assessing and moving collections, and general overviews. How to Thrive as a Solo Librarian will be useful for all professionals and students in the field of librarianship.
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About the author

Carol Smallwood has worked as a public library systems administrator and consultant, and in school, academic, and special libraries. She has authored, co-authored, edited, and co-edited several books, including Writing and Publishing: The Librarian's Handbook (2010) and Librarians as Community Partners: An Outreach Handbook (2010). Her articles have appeared in numerous journals, including American Libraries.

Melissa J. Clapp is the Coordinator of Instruction & Outreach at Humanities & Social Sciences Library West, University of Florida. Her most recent publication appears in Collaborative Librarianship.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Scarecrow Press
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Published on
Sep 16, 2011
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Pages
314
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ISBN
9780810882140
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Language
English
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Genres
Language Arts & Disciplines / Library & Information Science / Administration & Management
Language Arts & Disciplines / Library & Information Science / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Creative Management of Small Public Libraries in the 21st Century is an anthology on small public libraries as centers of communities serving populations under 25,000 that make up most of the public library systems in the United States. A wide selection of topics was sought from contributors with varied backgrounds reflecting the diversity of small public libraries. The thirty-two chapters are arranged: Staff; Programming; Management; Technology; Networking; Fundraising; User Services and provide tools to lead a local public library with relevant and successful services. This volume shares a common sense approach to providing a small (in staff size or budget) but mighty (in impact and outcome) public library service. The contributors demonstrate that by turning the service delivery team outward to the community with enthusiasm and positive energy, it is possible to achieve significant results. Many chapters summarize best practices that can serve as checklists for the novice library director or as a review for the more seasoned manager working through new responsibilities. Chapters are tactical, focusing on specific issues for managers such as performance evaluations, effective programming, or e-reader services. Time management is crucial in a small or rural public library as well as the challenges associated with managing Friends and volunteers.

While most public libraries do not have the resources to satisfy customer expectations for instant gratification, ultra-convenience and state-of-the-art technologies, The authors of this book details strategies and methods for providing top-notch customer service while moving beyond customer service to the creation of meaningful customer relationships. This volume makes an important contribution to the literature by reminding us that public libraries transform communities of every size. In fact, never before has the role of the public library been a more critical thread in the fabric of community life.
Trained library support staff is critical in assisting the user in locating and interpreting the resources available in libraries. To do so requires the knowledge and practice of library missions and roles in different types of libraries and the delivery of that information to an increasingly diverse clientele. The plethora of resources available today requires that support staff understand and implement the basic principles of information services as well as the responsibility and relationships among library departments and functional areas.

Foundations of Library Services is both a text for professors who teach in library support staff programs and an introductory reference manual for support staff who work in libraries. This book will guide the LSS to be able to:
Understand the mission and role of the library in its communityBe familiar with the ethics and values of the profession, including those of the Library Bill of Rights, the ALA Code of Ethics, freedom of information, confidentiality of library records and privacy issuesKnow the responsibility and relationships among library departmentsPractice the basic principles of circulation, including interlibrary loan; current cataloging and classification systems; and acquisitions and collection development policies.Understand how libraries are governed and funded within their organizations or government structuresRealize the value of cooperation to enhance servicesPractice quality customer serviceCommunicate and promote the library’s values and servicesRecognize and respond to diversity in user needs
From the Forward by Michael Lesk:
Google has now developed services far beyond text search. Google software will translate languages and support collaborative writing. The chapters in this book look at many Google services, from music to finance, and describe how they can be used by students and other library users.
Going beyond information resources, there are now successful collaboration services available from Google and others. You can make conference calls with video and shared screens using Google Hangouts,
Writing documents with small numbers of colleagues often involved delays while each author in sequence took over the writing and made edits. Today Google Docs enables multiple people to edit the same document at once. An ingenious use of color lets each participant watch in real time as the other participants edit, and keeps track of who is doing what. If the goal is to create a website rather than to write a report, Google Sites is now one of the most popular platforms. Google is also involved in social networking, with services such as Google+
Other tools view social developments over time and space. The Google Trends service, for example, will show you when and where people are searching for topics. Not surprisingly, searches for “swimwear” peak in June and searches for “snowmobile” peak in January.

The Complete Guide to Using Google in Libraries, Volume 2: Research, User Applications, and Networking has 30 chapters divided into four parts: Research, User Applications, Networking, Searching. The contributors are practitioners who use the services they write about and they provide how-to advice that will help public, school, academic, and special librarians; library consultants, LIS faculty and students, and technology professionals.
The LITA Leadership Guide from the American Library Association division charged with information technology brings together three important professional development topics -- leadership, entrepreneurship, and technology -- in one volume, uniting theory, practice, and case studies from experienced colleagues in the field.
Topics include: cultivating creativity, career pivots, forecasting and planning for change, keeping tech and leadership skills ahead of the curve, and incorporating lessons and knowledge from across sectors. Additional concepts include: professional development, evaluating risk, overcoming barriers to innovation, and seeding success in your career and organization.
The book will help librarians at every level of the career ladder and will supplement leadership and skill-based training workshops. Library leadership teams interested in the development of their staff as a means of improving their organizational performance will find this book to provide context for growth, training, and collaboration.
This book provides big-picture concepts that affect the many stages of a librarian’s career:
•“Librarian as Leader”,
• “Librarian as Entrepreneur”, and
•“Librarian as Technologist”
and thus is suitable for staff development, discussion groups, or courses. This LITA Guide will help librarians understand how to chart their career development across these three foundational platforms, and become familiar with how peers have successfully created positive change for themselves, and their libraries, as leaders, entrepreneurs, and technologists
Keeping up with technology is more critical and difficult than ever. This challenge exists not only for library staff but for their patrons as well. Today's librarians are often barraged with increasingly complex questions from their patrons about technology—from loading eBooks onto their readers to helping resurrect dead laptops. Why not capitalize on this opportunity and transform your library into a first-stop, go-to resource for your community's tech needs?

Raising the Tech Bar at Your Library: Improving Services to Meet User Needs demonstrates a variety of ways to expand library services to better serve your community, including how to establish tech bars and tech centers, provide tech training and one-on-one tech help, host drop-in demos, and create a coding "dojo." The book covers after-school programs, makerspaces, and embedded librarianship as well. The authors draw on their personal experience to offer a practical blueprint for launching your tech initiative, starting with the preliminary steps of evaluating community needs and getting administrative and public buy-in to obtaining funding, training non-tech staff, setting up and launching your program, and evaluating the services you've established. The book ends with a look to the future that supplies provocative and exciting ideas of how libraries with innovative, tech-focused leadership can push the edge even further. This book serves a wide audience—all public librarians as well as library administrators, those who work in IT departments as well as adult or youth services, and reference librarians who are interested in expanding into this important and exciting area.

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