How to Thrive as a Solo Librarian

Scarecrow Press
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How to Thrive as a Solo Librarian is a compilation of chapters by librarians offering advice to colleagues who must work alone or with very limited help. The contributors come from schools and colleges, special and corporate archives, public libraries, and seasoned LIS faculty across the United States and abroad who are familiar with the vigor, dedication, and creativity necessary for solo librarians.

As noted in the Foreword, "In many ways, solo librarianship demands more communication and collaboration than librarians might experience in larger multi-employee libraries." Despite the fact that most of the authors are currently working alone in their library or archives, they do not work in a vacuum. These chapters aim to help librarians thrive in the demanding environment that exists for the solo librarian. Topics covered include time management, community involvement, public relations and marketing, professional development, internet-based ideas, administrative tasks, assessing and moving collections, and general overviews. How to Thrive as a Solo Librarian will be useful for all professionals and students in the field of librarianship.
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About the author

Carol Smallwood has worked as a public library systems administrator and consultant, and in school, academic, and special libraries. She has authored, co-authored, edited, and co-edited several books, including Writing and Publishing: The Librarian's Handbook (2010) and Librarians as Community Partners: An Outreach Handbook (2010). Her articles have appeared in numerous journals, including American Libraries.

Melissa J. Clapp is the Coordinator of Instruction & Outreach at Humanities & Social Sciences Library West, University of Florida. Her most recent publication appears in Collaborative Librarianship.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Scarecrow Press
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Published on
Sep 16, 2011
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Pages
314
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ISBN
9780810882140
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Language
English
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Genres
Language Arts & Disciplines / Library & Information Science / Administration & Management
Language Arts & Disciplines / Library & Information Science / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Carol Smallwood
Creative Management of Small Public Libraries in the 21st Century is an anthology on small public libraries as centers of communities serving populations under 25,000 that make up most of the public library systems in the United States. A wide selection of topics was sought from contributors with varied backgrounds reflecting the diversity of small public libraries. The thirty-two chapters are arranged: Staff; Programming; Management; Technology; Networking; Fundraising; User Services and provide tools to lead a local public library with relevant and successful services. This volume shares a common sense approach to providing a small (in staff size or budget) but mighty (in impact and outcome) public library service. The contributors demonstrate that by turning the service delivery team outward to the community with enthusiasm and positive energy, it is possible to achieve significant results. Many chapters summarize best practices that can serve as checklists for the novice library director or as a review for the more seasoned manager working through new responsibilities. Chapters are tactical, focusing on specific issues for managers such as performance evaluations, effective programming, or e-reader services. Time management is crucial in a small or rural public library as well as the challenges associated with managing Friends and volunteers.

While most public libraries do not have the resources to satisfy customer expectations for instant gratification, ultra-convenience and state-of-the-art technologies, The authors of this book details strategies and methods for providing top-notch customer service while moving beyond customer service to the creation of meaningful customer relationships. This volume makes an important contribution to the literature by reminding us that public libraries transform communities of every size. In fact, never before has the role of the public library been a more critical thread in the fabric of community life.
Book 2
From the Forward by Michael Lesk:
Google has now developed services far beyond text search. Google software will translate languages and support collaborative writing. The chapters in this book look at many Google services, from music to finance, and describe how they can be used by students and other library users.
Going beyond information resources, there are now successful collaboration services available from Google and others. You can make conference calls with video and shared screens using Google Hangouts,
Writing documents with small numbers of colleagues often involved delays while each author in sequence took over the writing and made edits. Today Google Docs enables multiple people to edit the same document at once. An ingenious use of color lets each participant watch in real time as the other participants edit, and keeps track of who is doing what. If the goal is to create a website rather than to write a report, Google Sites is now one of the most popular platforms. Google is also involved in social networking, with services such as Google+
Other tools view social developments over time and space. The Google Trends service, for example, will show you when and where people are searching for topics. Not surprisingly, searches for “swimwear” peak in June and searches for “snowmobile” peak in January.

The Complete Guide to Using Google in Libraries, Volume 2: Research, User Applications, and Networking has 30 chapters divided into four parts: Research, User Applications, Networking, Searching. The contributors are practitioners who use the services they write about and they provide how-to advice that will help public, school, academic, and special librarians; library consultants, LIS faculty and students, and technology professionals.
Carol Smallwood
Fewer employees, shorter hours, diminished collection budgets, reduced programs and services--all at a time of record library usage. In this book, library expert Carol Smallwood demonstrates that despite the obvious downsides, the necessity of doing business differently can be positive, leading to partnering, sharing, and innovating. This collection speaks to universal concerns, presenting creative and resourceful solutions from dozens of librarians representing a wide variety of institutions. The "Frugal Librarian" helps library professionals: (1) Find supplementary funding sources, including grants; (2) Save money by sharing resources, using tiered staffing for technical services, and implementing green it; (3) Tap into grassroots movements to save neighborhood libraries; and (4) Preserve and enhance important library functions like programming, outreach, and staff development, despite a tight budget. This book offers plenty of ideas that can be implemented immediately. The book is divided into the following Parts: Part I, Helping Patrons Job Search, contains: (1) Knowledge-Based Job Hunting and Interview Preparation (Michael A. Germano); and (2) Start Your Job Search Here (Jason Kuhl); Part ii, Librarian Survival, presents: (3) Entrepreneurs in the Library: How an Entrepreneurial Spirit Expanded the Patron Base and Elevated Its Political Standing (James Lund); (4) Laid Off? Here's One Way to Land on Your Feet (J. James Mancuso); (5) Low- and No-Cost Development Opportunities for Librarians (Colleen S. Harris); (6) Online Resources in Michigan: a School Librarian Survives Hard Times (Margaret Lincoln). Part iii, Grants, continues with: (7) Grant Proposals for the Working Librarian: From Idea to Implementation (Lois Stickell and Lisa Nickel); (8) Tools for Grant Searching (Victoria Lynn Packard); and (9) Writing Grant Proposals for Diverse Populations (Vandella Brown). (4) Part iv, Programming, includes: (10) Creating and Sustaining Community-Focused Programs (Wayne Finley and Joanna Kluever); and (11) Nothing to Lose: Creative Programming for the Frugal Librarian (Lisa A. Forrest). Part v, Sharing, includes: (12) Increasing Resources in Tough Times: a New Funding Model for the Purdue University Career Wiki (George Bergstrom and Mary Dugan); (13) Innovating and Saving with Joint-Use Libraries (Emily Dill); (14) Multitype Regional Library Responses to the Economic Crisis (Tom Taylor); (15) Museum Passes: a Low-Cost, High-Impact Partnership (Rebecca Tuck and Lisa Fraser); and (16) Saving by Sharing: Using Open-Source and Shared Catalogs to Do More with Less (John Helling). Part vi, Management, presents: (17) Bringing the Outside Back In: Creative and Cost-Effective Outreach Strategies (Kacy Vega and Kim Becnel); (18) Cost Factors in Digital Projects: a Model Useful in Other Applications (Lisa L. Crane); (19) Data-Driven Cancellation Decisions (Leslie Farison); (20) Green Information Technology Saves Money, Saves Resources (Sarah Passonneau); (21) Managing Staff Stress during Budget Crises: Lessons for Library Managers (Colleen S. Harris and Mary Chimato), and (22) Student Assistants: Maximize Effectiveness through Coordinated Training (Ken Johnson and Sue Hisle). Part vii, On-the-Job Success, contains: (23) Bidding Service Contracts in Public Libraries (Tom Cooper); (24) Digital Projects on a Shoestring (Emily Asch); (25) Developing Partnerships for Added Value (Aline Soules and Sarah Nielsen); (26) Organizing in the Streets and in the Stacks: a Grassroots Movement Saves Neighborhood Libraries (Edgar C. Bailey Jr.); (27) Turning Gifts and Discards into Gold (Robert Holley); and (28) a Small School Library Meets the Economic Challenge (Colleen Driscoll). Part viii, Staffing, presents: (29) Leveraging Internal Resources to Fill Library Staff Shortages Temporarily (Marwin Britto); (30) Making Good by Making Do: Using Student Staff to Drive Library Technology Innovation (Gwen Evans); (31) Tiered Staffing for Technical Services (Mary S. Laskowski and Fang Huang Gao); (32) We're All in This Together: Solutions for Creative Staffing (Heidi Blackburn and Erin Davis). Part ix, Professional Development, includes: (33) Building Sustainable Professional Development Opportunities in Technology Literacy (Marwin Britto) and (34) $40 a Day, or Attending Library Conferences on the Cheap (Regina Koury).
Carol Smallwood
There's no shortage of library management books out there--but how many of them actually tackle the little details of day-to-day management, the hard-to-categorize things that slip through the cracks of a larger handbook? "Library Management Tips that Work" does exactly that, addressing dozens of such issues facing library managers, including: (1) How to create a job manual, and keep staff accountable; (2) Keeping your library board in the loop; (3) Using numbers to make your case; (4) Dealing with unreturned library materials; (5) Methods for managing multiple libraries with one fte librarian; (6) Retaining services despite budget cuts and staff shortages; and (7) Public relations on a shoestring. This book is divided into five parts. Part I, The Manager Role, contains the following: (1) Beating the Clock: Adaptive Time Management in a Fluid Environment (Geoffrey P. Timms); (2) Creating Manuals for Job Duties (Holly Flynn); (3) How to Manage Serving Students of Generational Poverty (Kris Baughman and Rebecca Marcum Parker); (4) How to Protect Your Library from Employment Discrimination Claims (Michael A. Germano); (5) Managing Emergencies: What to Do When Basic or Big Disasters Strike (Sian Brannon and Kimberly Wells); (6) Creating a Staff Accountability System (Terry Ann Lawler); (7) Planning Ahead: Time Management in Defining Goals (Geoffrey P. Timms); (8) Transforming an Off-Campus Library from Empty Space to Award Winner in One Year (Seamus Scanlon); (9) When You're Not (Exactly) the Boss: How to Manage Effectively in a "Coordinator" Role (Kim Becnel); and (10) Communication and Staff Awareness in the Branch Library (Jason Kuhl). Part ii, Running a Library, contains the following: (11) ASSURE-ing Your Collection (Roxanne Myers Spencer and Barbara Fiehn); (12) Billy Club: a Model for Dealing with Unreturned Library Materials (Suzann Holland); (13) Collaboration for Library Collection Acquisition (Lorette S.J. Weldon); (14) Community Partnerships: The Key to Providing Programs in a Recession (Ashanti White); (15) cvl Leads: Mentorship and Leadership (Robin Shader); (16) How to Manage a Student-Centric Library Service for Nontraditional Users (Seamus Scanlon); (17) Managing Overnight (Ken Johnson and Susan Jennings); (18) Managing More Than One School Library with One fte Librarian (Kris Baughman and Rebecca Marcum Parker); (19) Management Tips for Merging Multiple Service Points (Colleen S. Harris); (20) SuperStarz: An Experience in Grant Project Management (Vera Gubnitskaia); (21) Utilizing Retired Individuals as Volunteers (Ashanti White); and (22) Weeding as Affective Response, or "I Just Can't Throw This Out!" (Barbara Fiehn and Roxanne Myers Spencer). Part iii, Information Technology, contains the following: (23) Facebook for Student Assistants (Susan Jennings and Ken Johnson); (24) Improving Communication with Blogs (Alice B. Ruleman); (25) Improving Productivity with Google Apps (Suzann Holland); (26) Partnering with Information Technology at the Reference Desk: a Model for Success (Jeffrey A. Franks); (27) Putting Missing Pieces from the Collection Together with SharePoint (Lorette S.J. Weldon); (28) Real-Life Management Using Virtual Tools (Vera Gubnitskaia); (29) Session Control Software for Community Users in an Academic Library (Jeffrey A. Franks); (30) To Friend or Not to Friend: The Facebook Question (Kim Becnel); and (31) Why a Wiki? How Wikis Help Get Work Done (Alice B. Ruleman). Part iv, Staff, contains the following: (32) Millennials, Gen-X, Gen-Y, and Boomers, Oh My! Managing Multiple Generations in the Library (Colleen S. Harris); (33) Hiring and Training Graduate Assistants for the Academic Library (Erin O'Toole); (34) Managing for Emergencies: What to Do before, during, and after Disaster (Sian Brannon and Kimberly Wells); (35) Managing Librarians and Staff with Young Children (Holly Flynn); (36) Mentoring Graduate Assistants in the Academic Library (Erin O'Toole); (37) New Employee Orientation (Bradley Tolppanen and Janice Derr); (38) Discrimination in Employment: An Overview for Library Managers (Michael A. Germano); (39) Obtaining Compliance from Underperforming Employees: Talking It Through (Terry Ann Lawler); (40) Planning for Change: Ensuring Staff Commitment (Jason Kuhl); (41) Shadow and Learn: Knowing Your Staff (Robin Shader); and (42) Staff Shortages (Bradley Tolppanen and Janice Derr). Part v, Public Relations, contains the following: (43) No Surprises: Keeping Your Board in the Loop (Lynn Hawkins); (44) Board Meetings That Work (James B. Casey); (45) Library Partners: Cooperating with Other Nonprofits (John Helling); (46) Portraits in a Small Town: Balancing Access and Privacy with a Local History Photography Collection (John Helling); (47) Using Numbers to Make Your Case (James B. Casey); and (48) Staying in the Game: Public Relations on a Shoestring (Lynn Hawkins). An index is included.
Carol Smallwood
Creative Management of Small Public Libraries in the 21st Century is an anthology on small public libraries as centers of communities serving populations under 25,000 that make up most of the public library systems in the United States. A wide selection of topics was sought from contributors with varied backgrounds reflecting the diversity of small public libraries. The thirty-two chapters are arranged: Staff; Programming; Management; Technology; Networking; Fundraising; User Services and provide tools to lead a local public library with relevant and successful services. This volume shares a common sense approach to providing a small (in staff size or budget) but mighty (in impact and outcome) public library service. The contributors demonstrate that by turning the service delivery team outward to the community with enthusiasm and positive energy, it is possible to achieve significant results. Many chapters summarize best practices that can serve as checklists for the novice library director or as a review for the more seasoned manager working through new responsibilities. Chapters are tactical, focusing on specific issues for managers such as performance evaluations, effective programming, or e-reader services. Time management is crucial in a small or rural public library as well as the challenges associated with managing Friends and volunteers.

While most public libraries do not have the resources to satisfy customer expectations for instant gratification, ultra-convenience and state-of-the-art technologies, The authors of this book details strategies and methods for providing top-notch customer service while moving beyond customer service to the creation of meaningful customer relationships. This volume makes an important contribution to the literature by reminding us that public libraries transform communities of every size. In fact, never before has the role of the public library been a more critical thread in the fabric of community life.
Carol Smallwood
Preservation of historical documents and library related materials is a growing problem in all library types and institutions. Fortunately, editors Carol Smallwood and Elaine Williams have pulled together the wisdom of practicing professionals to elucidate how to cope with the many problems that arise when preserving, managing, and digitizing important collections.

Preserving Local Writers, Genealogy, Photographs, Newspapers, and Related Materials contains informative chapters on physical preservation, collection management, cooperation with organizations and communities, various formats, and special projects. Each part covers the preservation of specific materials, from newspapers and scrapbooks to photographs and oral histories. In addition, chapters cover repair and restoration of materials, while taking into consideration the current state of funding for agencies with an interest in history. Contributors also shed light on how the racial, economic, and political dynamics of the past affect how collections are gathered, maintained, and presented today.

Preserving Local Writers, Genealogy, Photographs, Newspapers, and Related Materials offers plenty to inspire anyone facing backlogs of unprocessed papers or boxes of artifacts. Stories of the rescue efforts of a group of volunteers, or the discovery of a lost diary, show that the hard work of preservation is well worth it. Libraries, archives, and historical and genealogical societies all have their role to play in preserving important historical materials, as do patrons, sponsors, and volunteers; such institutions and individuals will find this book extremely helpful in their preservation efforts.
Book 2
From the Forward by Michael Lesk:
Google has now developed services far beyond text search. Google software will translate languages and support collaborative writing. The chapters in this book look at many Google services, from music to finance, and describe how they can be used by students and other library users.
Going beyond information resources, there are now successful collaboration services available from Google and others. You can make conference calls with video and shared screens using Google Hangouts,
Writing documents with small numbers of colleagues often involved delays while each author in sequence took over the writing and made edits. Today Google Docs enables multiple people to edit the same document at once. An ingenious use of color lets each participant watch in real time as the other participants edit, and keeps track of who is doing what. If the goal is to create a website rather than to write a report, Google Sites is now one of the most popular platforms. Google is also involved in social networking, with services such as Google+
Other tools view social developments over time and space. The Google Trends service, for example, will show you when and where people are searching for topics. Not surprisingly, searches for “swimwear” peak in June and searches for “snowmobile” peak in January.

The Complete Guide to Using Google in Libraries, Volume 2: Research, User Applications, and Networking has 30 chapters divided into four parts: Research, User Applications, Networking, Searching. The contributors are practitioners who use the services they write about and they provide how-to advice that will help public, school, academic, and special librarians; library consultants, LIS faculty and students, and technology professionals.
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