Time and Space in Literacy Research

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Literacy researchers interested in how specific sites of learning situate students and the ways they make sense of their worlds are asking new questions and thinking in new ways about how time and space operate as contextual dimensions in the learning lives of students, teachers, and families. These investigations inform questions related to history, identity, methodology, in-school and out-of school spaces, and local/global literacies. An engaging blend of methodological, theoretical, and empirical work featuring well-known researchers on the topic, this book provides a conceptual framework for extending existing conceptions of context and provides unique and ground-breaking examples of empirical research.
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About the author

Catherine Compton-Lilly is Associate Professor, University of Wisconsin, Madison, USA.

Erica Halverson is Associate Professor, University of Wisconsin, Madison, USA.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Routledge
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Published on
Apr 24, 2014
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Pages
210
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ISBN
9781317748694
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / Research
Language Arts & Disciplines / Literacy
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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While teachers cannot travel back in time to visit their students at earlier ages, they can draw on the rich sets of experiences and knowledge that students bring to classrooms. In her latest book, Catherine Compton-Lilly examines the literacy practices and school trajectories of eight middle school students and their families. Through a unique longitudinal lens—the author has studied these same students from first grade—we see how students from a low-income, inner-city community grow and develop academically, revealing critical insights for teachers about literacy development, identity construction, and school achievement.

Based on interviews, reading assessments, and writing samples,Reading Timeadvocates for educators to:



Provide opportunities for students to develop long-term relationships with teachers and administrators.
Allow children and parents to share their stories to identify obstacles that students encounter as they move through school.
Collaborate and learn from students’ former teachers, as well as inform their future teachers.
Develop portfolio systems and longitudinal records that highlight children’s emerging interests, abilities, and potential for the future.

Catherine Compton-Lillyis an associate professor in Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. She has taught in the public school system for 18 years. Her books includeReading Families,Re-reading Families, andBedtime Stories and Book Reports.


“The analysis here runs deeper than other contemporary critiques of accountability regimes and standardization, inviting us instead to consider how time, schooling, and literacy have always been co-constructed....Reading Timefeatures compelling examples of literacy practices that traverse generations, which could only be understood through interviews and observations extending over time.”

—Kevin Leander, Vanderbilt University

While teachers cannot travel back in time to visit their students at earlier ages, they can draw on the rich sets of experiences and knowledge that students bring to classrooms. In her latest book, Catherine Compton-Lilly examines the literacy practices and school trajectories of eight middle school students and their families. Through a unique longitudinal lens—the author has studied these same students from first grade—we see how students from a low-income, inner-city community grow and develop academically, revealing critical insights for teachers about literacy development, identity construction, and school achievement.

Based on interviews, reading assessments, and writing samples,Reading Timeadvocates for educators to:



Provide opportunities for students to develop long-term relationships with teachers and administrators.
Allow children and parents to share their stories to identify obstacles that students encounter as they move through school.
Collaborate and learn from students’ former teachers, as well as inform their future teachers.
Develop portfolio systems and longitudinal records that highlight children’s emerging interests, abilities, and potential for the future.

Catherine Compton-Lillyis an associate professor in Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. She has taught in the public school system for 18 years. Her books includeReading Families,Re-reading Families, andBedtime Stories and Book Reports.


“The analysis here runs deeper than other contemporary critiques of accountability regimes and standardization, inviting us instead to consider how time, schooling, and literacy have always been co-constructed....Reading Timefeatures compelling examples of literacy practices that traverse generations, which could only be understood through interviews and observations extending over time.”

—Kevin Leander, Vanderbilt University

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