Principles of Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

Cambridge University Press
Free sample

Fluid dynamical forces drive most of the fundamental processes in the Universe and so play a crucial role in our understanding of astrophysics. This comprehensive textbook, first published in 2007, introduces the necessary fluid dynamics to understand a wide range of astronomical phenomena, from stellar structures to supernovae blast waves, to accretion discs. The authors' approach is to introduce and derive the fundamental equations, supplemented by text that conveys a more intuitive understanding of the subject, and to emphasise the observable phenomena that rely on fluid dynamical processes. The textbook has been developed for use by final-year undergraduate and starting graduate students of astrophysics, and contains over fifty exercises. It is based on the authors' many years of teaching their astrophysical fluid dynamics course at the University of Cambridge.
Read more

About the author

Cathie Clarke is Reader in Theoretical Astrophysics at the University of Cambridge and Director of Studies in Astrophysics at Clare College. She developed the original course in Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics as part of Part II Astrophysics in 1996 and delivered the course 1996–9. Her research is based on accretion disc theory and star formation (both of which are strongly based on fluid dynamics) and she is the author of around 70 articles in refereed journals, plus a further 50 reviews, proceedings etc. She has taught extensively within the University of Cambridge, having also delivered lecture courses in Statistical Physics, Mathematical Methods and Galactic Dynamics, and has supervised for a variety of courses within the Physics and Mathematics Triposes.

Bob Carswell is Professor of Astronomy at the University of Cambridge. He lectured the Part II Astrophysics course on Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics 2000–3, and developed the course notes to reflect a revised syllabus to include accretion disks and some MHD concepts. He has also given courses in Relativity to both third-year and fourth-year undergraduates, as well as specialist courses on Gaseous Nebulae at the postgraduate level. His research relates to quasars, the intergalactic medium and large-scale structure.

Read more
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Read more
Published on
Mar 8, 2007
Read more
Pages
237
Read more
ISBN
9781139462235
Read more
Read more
Best For
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
Science / Mechanics / Fluids
Science / Physics / Astrophysics
Science / Physics / General
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
Where do most stars (and the planetary systems that surround them) in the Milky Way form? What determines whether a young star cluster remains bound (such as an open or globular cluster), or disperses to join the field stars in the disc of the Galaxy? These questions not only impact understanding of the origins of stars and planetary systems like our own (and the potential for life to emerge that they represent), but also galaxy formation and evolution, and ultimately the story of star formation over cosmic time in the Universe.

This volume will help readers understand our current views concerning the answers to these questions as well as frame new questions that will be answered by the European Space Agency's Gaia satellite that was launched in late 2013. The book contains the elaborated notes of lectures given at the 42nd Saas-Fee Advanced Course “Dynamics of Young Star Clusters & Associations" by Cathie Clarke (University of Cambridge) who presents the theory of star formation and dynamical evolution of stellar systems, Robert Mathieu (University of Wisconsin) who discusses the kinematics of star clusters and associations, and I. Neill Reid (S

pace Telescope Science Institute) who provides an overview of the stellar populations in the Milky Way and speculates on from whence came the Sun. As part of the Saas-Fee Advanced Course Series, the book offers an in-depth introduction to the field serving as a starting point for Ph.D. research and as a reference work for professional astrophysicists.

Where do most stars (and the planetary systems that surround them) in the Milky Way form? What determines whether a young star cluster remains bound (such as an open or globular cluster), or disperses to join the field stars in the disc of the Galaxy? These questions not only impact understanding of the origins of stars and planetary systems like our own (and the potential for life to emerge that they represent), but also galaxy formation and evolution, and ultimately the story of star formation over cosmic time in the Universe.

This volume will help readers understand our current views concerning the answers to these questions as well as frame new questions that will be answered by the European Space Agency's Gaia satellite that was launched in late 2013. The book contains the elaborated notes of lectures given at the 42nd Saas-Fee Advanced Course “Dynamics of Young Star Clusters & Associations" by Cathie Clarke (University of Cambridge) who presents the theory of star formation and dynamical evolution of stellar systems, Robert Mathieu (University of Wisconsin) who discusses the kinematics of star clusters and associations, and I. Neill Reid (S

pace Telescope Science Institute) who provides an overview of the stellar populations in the Milky Way and speculates on from whence came the Sun. As part of the Saas-Fee Advanced Course Series, the book offers an in-depth introduction to the field serving as a starting point for Ph.D. research and as a reference work for professional astrophysicists.

©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.