Light after Dark III: The Mathematics of Gravity and Quanta

Troubador Publishing Ltd
Free Sample

Light after Dark III: The Mathematics of Gravity and Quanta proves the most important results described in Light after Dark II, from fundamental principles, as elegantly as possible and with the minimum of verbiage. This is a first principles account of the mathematical structure of modern theoretical physics, showing that it is not just a disparate bunch of algorithms and procedures, but is a unified structure based on observation, sound principles and solid logic, and allowing a unique physical interpretation in terms of fundamental constituents, or particles.Light after Dark III: The Mathematics of Gravity and Quanta explains essential mathematics at undergraduate level. Part I covers many core topics in a mathematics degree. Part II is a concise account of results in relativity, including the Lorentz transform from first principles, Riemann curvature, Einstein’s equation, derivations of the Schwarzschild and Friedmann solutions, and proofs of key results. Part III contains the mathematical foundations of relativistic quantum mechanics and constructs quantum electrodynamics. Divergence problems are treated with greater rigour than usual in theoretical physics, but without excessive formality. Classical electromagnetism is derived from fundamental principles. Part IV shows how quantum electrodynamics and general relativity can be described in a single structure. Light after Dark III: The Mathematics of Gravity and Quanta will interest students of mathematics and students of physics and philosophy with a mathematical leaning who are seeking a rigorous treatment and deeper mathematical insight into physical theory.
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About the author

Charles Francis has a first in mathematics in mathematics from the University of Cambridge and a Ph.D. in mathematics from London University. He has been investigating the fundamental structures of physics for nearly forty years and has published over a dozen papers with over 170 citations on topics ranging from galactic dynamics to quantum electrodynamics in journals such as Proc. Royal Society A and Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

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Additional information

Publisher
Troubador Publishing Ltd
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Published on
17 Sep 2018
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Pages
200
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ISBN
9781785897634
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Physics / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Wolfgang Pauli (1900–1958) was one of the 20th-century's most influential physicists. He was awarded the 1945 Nobel Prize for physics for the discovery of the exclusion principle (also called the Pauli principle). A brilliant theoretician, he was the first to posit the existence of the neutrino and one of the few early 20th-century physicists to fully understand the enormity of Einstein's theory of relativity.
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