The Saint's Tragedy: Or, The True Story of Elizabeth of Hungary, Landgravine of Thuringia, Saint of the Romish Calendar

J.W. Parker & son
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Publisher
J.W. Parker & son
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Published on
Dec 31, 1851
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Pages
192
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Language
English
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This content is DRM free.
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Once upon a time there was a little chimney-sweep, and his name was Tom. That is a short name, and you have heard it before, so you will not have much trouble in remembering it. He lived in a great town in the North country, where there were plenty of chimneys to sweep, and plenty of money for Tom to earn and his master to spend. He could not read nor write, and did not care to do either; and he never washed himself, for there was no water up the court where he lived. He had never been taught to say his prayers. He never had heard of God, or of Christ, except in words which you never have heard, and which it would have been well if he had never heard. He cried half his time, and laughed the other half. He cried when he had to climb the dark flues, rubbing his poor knees and elbows raw; and when the soot got into his eyes, which it did every day in the week; and when his master beat him, which he did every day in the week; and when he had not enough to eat, which happened every day in the week likewise. And he laughed the other half of the day, when he was tossing halfpennies with the other boys, or playing leap-frog over the posts, or bowling stones at the horses' legs as they trotted by, which last was excellent fun, when there was a wall at hand behind which to hide. As for chimney-sweeping, and being hungry, and being beaten, he took all that for the way of the world, like the rain and snow and thunder, and stood manfully with his back to it till it was over, as his old donkey did to a hail-storm; and then shook his ears and was as jolly as ever; and thought of the fine times coming, when he would be a man, and a master sweep, and sit in the public-house with a quart of beer and a long pipe, and play cards for silver money, and wear velveteens and ankle-jacks, and keep a white bull-dog with one grey ear, and carry her puppies in his pocket, just like a man. And he would have apprentices, one, two, three, if he could. How he would bully them, and knock them about, just as his master did to him; and make them carry home the soot sacks, while he rode before them on his donkey, with a pipe in his mouth and a flower in his button-hole, like a king at the head of his army. Yes, there were good times coming; and, when his master let him have a pull at the leavings of his beer, Tom was the jolliest boy in the whole town.

One day a smart little groom rode into the court where Tom lived. Tom was just hiding behind a wall, to heave half a brick at his horse's legs, as is the custom of that country when they welcome strangers; but the groom saw him, and halloed to him to know where Mr. Grimes, the chimney-sweep, lived. Now, Mr. Grimes was Tom's own master, and Tom was a good man of business, and always civil to customers, so he put the half-brick down quietly behind the wall, and proceeded to take orders.

This unique Christmas collection has been formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices. The edition includes some the most beloved Christmas poems and carols: The Three Kings (Henry Wadsworth Longfellow) Christmas At Sea (Robert Louis Stevenson) Angels from the Realms of Glory (James Montgomery) Christmas in the Olden Time (Walter Scott) Christmas In India (Rudyard Kipling) Old Santa Claus (Clement Clarke Moore) The Twelve Days of Christmas Silent Night Minstrels (William Wordsworth) Ring Out, Wild Bells (Alfred Lord Tennyson) Hymn On The Morning Of Christ's Nativity (John Milton) A Christmas Carol (Samuel Taylor Coleridge) The Oxen (Thomas Hardy) A Christmas Ghost Story (Thomas Hardy) The Savior Must Have Been A Docile Gentleman (Emily Dickinson) 'Twas just this time, last year, I died (Emily Dickinson) The Magi (William Butler Yeats) The Mahogany Tree (William Makepeace Thackeray) A Bell (Clinton Scollard) Christmas Carol (Sara Teasdale) The Mystic's Christmas (John Greenleaf Whittier) Christmas Cheer (Thomas Tusser) Noel: Christmas Eve 1913 (Robert Seymour Bridges) The Holly and the Ivy Twas the Night before Christmas - A Visit From Saint Nicholas (Clement Moore) Adam lay ybounden Christmas Day (Charles Kingsley) Christmas Bells (Henry Wadsworth Longfellow) Christmas Fancies (Ella Wheeler Wilcox) Twas jolly, jolly Wat (C. W. Stubbs) A Tale Of Christmas Eve (William Topaz McGonagall) Jest 'Fore Christmas (Eugene Field) A Christmas Folksong (Paul Laurence Dunbar) As with Gladness Men of Old (William Chatterton Dix) Nativity a Christmas (John Donne) Marmion: A Christmas Poem (Walter Scott) Boar's Head Carol Come, Thou Long Expected Jesus (Charles Wesley) Coventry Carol Here We Come
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