The African Origin of Civilization: Myth Or Reality

Chicago Review Press
37
Free sample

From the Publisher: Edited and translated by Mercer Cook. Laymen and scholars alike will welcome the publication of this one-volume translation of the major sections of C.A. Diop's two books, Nations negres et culture and Anteriorite des civilizations negres, which have profoundly influenced thinking about Africa around the world. It was largely because of these works that, at the World Festival of the Arts held in Dakar in 1966, Dr. Diop shared with the late W.E.B. DuBois an award as the writer who had exerted the greatest influence on Negro thought in the 20th century.
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About the author

Cheikh Anta Diop was a Senegalese historian, anthropologist, and scholar of Afrocentricity.
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4.9
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Additional Information

Publisher
Chicago Review Press
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Published on
Jul 31, 1989
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Pages
336
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ISBN
9781613747360
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Africa / General
History / Africa / North
History / Social History
Social Science / Black Studies (Global)
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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In From Slave to Pharaoh, noted Egyptologist Donald B. Redford examines over two millennia of complex social and cultural interactions between Egypt and the Nubian and Sudanese civilizations that lay to the south of Egypt. These interactions resulted in the expulsion of the black Kushite pharaohs of the Twenty-fifth Dynasty in 671 B.C. by an invading Assyrian army.

Redford traces the development of Egyptian perceptions of race as their dominance over the darker-skinned peoples of Nubia and the Sudan grew, exploring the cultural construction of spatial and spiritual boundaries between Egypt and other African peoples. Redford focuses on the role of racial identity in the formulation of imperial power in Egypt and the legitimization of its sphere of influence, and he highlights the dichotomy between the Egyptians' treatment of the black Africans it deemed enemies and of those living within Egyptian society. He also describes the range of responses—from resistance to assimilation—of subjugated Nubians and Sudanese to their loss of self-determination. Indeed, by the time of the Twenty-fifth Dynasty, the culture of the Kushite kings who conquered Egypt in the late eighth century B.C. was thoroughly Egyptian itself.

Moving beyond recent debates between Afrocentrists and their critics over the racial characteristics of Egyptian civilization, From Slave to Pharaoh reveals the true complexity of race, identity, and power in Egypt as documented through surviving texts and artifacts, while at the same time providing a compelling account of war, conquest, and culture in the ancient world.

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