Building School 2.0: How to Create the Schools We Need

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Ninety-five propositions for creating more relevant, more caring schools

There is a growing desire to reexamine education and learning. Educators use the phrase "school 2.0" to think about what schools will look like in the future. Moving beyond a basic examination of using technology for classroom instruction, Building School 2.0: How to Create the Schools We Need is a larger discussion of how education, learning, and our physical school spaces can—and should—change because of the changing nature of our lives brought on by these technologies.

Well known for their work in creating Science Leadership Academy (SLA), a technology-rich, collaborative, learner-centric school in Philadelphia, founding principal Chris Lehmann and former SLA teacher Zac Chase are uniquely qualified to write about changing how we educate. The best strategies, they contend, enable networked learning that allows research, creativity, communication, and collaboration to help prepare students to be functional citizens within a modern society. Their model includes discussions of the following key concepts:

  • Technology must be ubiquitous, necessary, and invisible
  • Classrooms must be learner-centric and use backwards design principles
  • Good technology can be better than new technology
  • Teachers must serve as mentors and bring real-world experiences to students

Each section of Building School 2.0 presents a thesis designed to help educators and administrators to examine specific practices in their schools, and to then take their conclusions from theory to practice. Collectively, the theses represent a new vision of school, built off of the best of what has come before us, but with an eye toward a future we cannot fully imagine.

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About the author

CHRIS LEHMANN is the founding principal of the Science Leadership Academy, a progressive science and technology high school in Philadelphia, PA. Chris was named Outstanding Leader of the Year by the International Society of Technology in Education in 2013 and in 2014 was awarded the prestigious "Rising Star" McGraw Prize in Education. Chris is also the author of the education blog Practical Theory:www.practicaltheory.org.

ZAC CHASE is a former teacher, an instructional technology coordinator, a consultant, and a writer who blogs at www.autodizactic.com. An original Freedom Writer Teacher, he has contributed to several books including the bestselling Teaching Hope: Stories from the Freedom Writer Teachers and Freedom Writers Diary Teacher's Guide.

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Additional Information

Publisher
John Wiley & Sons
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Published on
Jul 31, 2015
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Pages
304
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ISBN
9781118222676
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / Computers & Technology
Education / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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It's never easy being rich: endless tax avoidance, the Sisyphean search for reliable domestic staff, the never-ending burden of surly stares from the Great Sea of the Unwashed as one goes about one's rightful business. Toughest of all is simply keeping track of everything one owns. There's so much of it. And personal possessions are just the beginning.
You must keep a gimlet eye, too, on the myriad people and institutions that safeguard your gilded status: politicians, newspapers, financial instruments, branches of government. They all belong to you. But staying on top of what they're up to is a full time job. What's an overstretched gazillionaire to do?
Now, with the publication of Rich People Things, the problems of our over-classes are, well, over. In a concise, easy-to-use guide, Chris Lehmann catalogs the fortifications that shelter the opulent from the resentments of the hoi polloi. From ideological stanchions such as the Free Market and the Prosperity Gospel, through the castellation of media, including The New York Times, Wired Magazine and Reality Television, to burly gatekeepers such as David Brooks, Steve Forbes and Alan Greenspan, the well-to-do will find, in these pages, a comforting and comprehensive array of the protections that allow them to sleep sound at night.
For the rest of us, Lehmann's sparkling prose, at the same time pointed and whimsical, together with the clever, teasing illustrations of Peter Arkle, can at least provide a diverting glimpse into how the top one percent maintains an iron grip on almost half of America's financial wealth.
In her award-winning book, Linda Darling-Hammond-renowned researcher, policy advisor, and educational leader-contends that improving America's performance in the global economy is closely tied to closing the minority-majority achievement gap at home. Today in the United States only 1 in 10 low-income kindergarteners goes on to graduate from college. At a time when education matters more than ever, the U.S. high school graduation rate has dropped from first in the world to the bottom half of rankings for comparable nations. While such sobering facts inform her new book, the author focuses on the successes of effective school systems in the U.S. and abroad in order to develop a clear and coherent set of policies that can be used to create high-quality and equitable schools. Drawing on her broad experience, Darling-Hammond examines the roots of our modern education system and shows how the skills required for our 21st-century global economy cannot be learned in traditional education systems, which have been in place since the early 1900s. She identifies an "opportunity gap" that has evolved as new kinds of learning have become necessary - a gap where low-income students, students of color, and English language learners often do not have the same access as others to qualified teachers, high-quality curriculum, and well-resourced classrooms. After setting the stage on current conditions in the United States, Darling-Hammond offers a coherent approach for effective reform that focuses on creating successful systems, inducting and supporting quality teachers, designing effective schools, establishing strong professional practice, and providing equitable and sufficient resources. The Flat World and Education lays out what the United States needs to do in order to build a system of high-achieving and equitable schools that ensures every child the right to learn.

Darling-Hammond is the Charles E. Ducommun Professor of Education at Stanford University, a chief education advisor to President Obama, Co-Director of the Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education, and Founding Director of the School Redesign Network at Stanford.

Facebook, Twitter, Google...today's tech-savvy students are alwaysplugged in. However, all too often their teachers andadministrators aren't experienced in the use of these familiardigital tools. If schools are to prepare students for the future,administrators and educators must harness the power of digitaltechnologies and social media.

With contributions from authorities on the topic of educationaltechnology, What School Leaders Need to Know About DigitalTechnologies and Social Media is a compendium of the mostuseful tools for any education setting. Throughout the book,experts including Will Richardson, Vicki Davis, SherylNussbaum-Beach, Richard Byrne, Joyce Valenza, and many othersexplain how administrators and teachers can best integratetechnology into schools, helping to make sense of theoften-confusing world of social media and digital tools. They offerthe most current information for the educational use of blogs,wikis and podcasts, online learning, open-source courseware,educational gaming, social networking, online mind mapping, mobilephones, and more, and include examples of these methods currentlyat work in schools. As the book clearly illustrates, when thesetools are combined with thoughtful and deliberate pedagogicalpractice, it can create a transformative experience for students,educators, and administrators alike.

What School Leaders Need to Know About Digital Technologiesand Social Media reveals the power of information technologyand social networks in the classroom and throughout the educationcommunity.

It's never easy being rich: endless tax avoidance, the Sisyphean search for reliable domestic staff, the never-ending burden of surly stares from the Great Sea of the Unwashed as one goes about one's rightful business. Toughest of all is simply keeping track of everything one owns. There's so much of it. And personal possessions are just the beginning.
You must keep a gimlet eye, too, on the myriad people and institutions that safeguard your gilded status: politicians, newspapers, financial instruments, branches of government. They all belong to you. But staying on top of what they're up to is a full time job. What's an overstretched gazillionaire to do?
Now, with the publication of Rich People Things, the problems of our over-classes are, well, over. In a concise, easy-to-use guide, Chris Lehmann catalogs the fortifications that shelter the opulent from the resentments of the hoi polloi. From ideological stanchions such as the Free Market and the Prosperity Gospel, through the castellation of media, including The New York Times, Wired Magazine and Reality Television, to burly gatekeepers such as David Brooks, Steve Forbes and Alan Greenspan, the well-to-do will find, in these pages, a comforting and comprehensive array of the protections that allow them to sleep sound at night.
For the rest of us, Lehmann's sparkling prose, at the same time pointed and whimsical, together with the clever, teasing illustrations of Peter Arkle, can at least provide a diverting glimpse into how the top one percent maintains an iron grip on almost half of America's financial wealth.
Ninety-five propositions for creating more relevant, more caring schools

There is a growing desire to reexamine education and learning. Educators use the phrase "school 2.0" to think about what schools will look like in the future. Moving beyond a basic examination of using technology for classroom instruction, Building School 2.0: How to Create the Schools We Need is a larger discussion of how education, learning, and our physical school spaces can—and should—change because of the changing nature of our lives brought on by these technologies.

Well known for their work in creating Science Leadership Academy (SLA), a technology-rich, collaborative, learner-centric school in Philadelphia, founding principal Chris Lehmann and former SLA teacher Zac Chase are uniquely qualified to write about changing how we educate. The best strategies, they contend, enable networked learning that allows research, creativity, communication, and collaboration to help prepare students to be functional citizens within a modern society. Their model includes discussions of the following key concepts:

Technology must be ubiquitous, necessary, and invisibleClassrooms must be learner-centric and use backwards design principlesGood technology can be better than new technologyTeachers must serve as mentors and bring real-world experiences to students

Each section of Building School 2.0 presents a thesis designed to help educators and administrators to examine specific practices in their schools, and to then take their conclusions from theory to practice. Collectively, the theses represent a new vision of school, built off of the best of what has come before us, but with an eye toward a future we cannot fully imagine.

Facebook, Twitter, Google...today's tech-savvy students are alwaysplugged in. However, all too often their teachers andadministrators aren't experienced in the use of these familiardigital tools. If schools are to prepare students for the future,administrators and educators must harness the power of digitaltechnologies and social media.

With contributions from authorities on the topic of educationaltechnology, What School Leaders Need to Know About DigitalTechnologies and Social Media is a compendium of the mostuseful tools for any education setting. Throughout the book,experts including Will Richardson, Vicki Davis, SherylNussbaum-Beach, Richard Byrne, Joyce Valenza, and many othersexplain how administrators and teachers can best integratetechnology into schools, helping to make sense of theoften-confusing world of social media and digital tools. They offerthe most current information for the educational use of blogs,wikis and podcasts, online learning, open-source courseware,educational gaming, social networking, online mind mapping, mobilephones, and more, and include examples of these methods currentlyat work in schools. As the book clearly illustrates, when thesetools are combined with thoughtful and deliberate pedagogicalpractice, it can create a transformative experience for students,educators, and administrators alike.

What School Leaders Need to Know About Digital Technologiesand Social Media reveals the power of information technologyand social networks in the classroom and throughout the educationcommunity.

A new collection on carnival hokum and magical thinking in post-apocalypse America—brought to you by The Baffler.

There's never been a better time to be outside the consensus—and if you don't believe it, then peer into these genre-defining essays from The Baffler, the magazine that's been blunting the cutting edge of American culture and politics for a quarter of a century. Here's Thomas Frank on the upward-falling cult of expertise in Washington, D.C., where belonging means getting the major events of our era wrong. Here's Rick Perlstein on direct mail scams, multilevel marketing, and the roots of right-wing lying. Here's John Summers on the illiberal uses of innovation in liberal Cambridge, Massachusetts. And here's David Graeber sensing our disappointment in new technology. (We expected teleportation pods, antigravity sleds, and immortality drugs. We got LinkedIn, which, as Ann Friedman writes here, is an Escher staircase masquerading as a career ladder.)

Packed with hilarious, scabrous, up to-the-minute criticism of the American comedy, No Future for You debunks “positive thinking” bromides and business idols. Susan Faludi debunks Facebook executive Sheryl Sandberg's phony feminist handbook, Lean In. Evgeny Morozov wrestles “open source” and “Web 2.0” and other pseudorevolutionary meme-making down to the ground. Chris Lehmann writes the obituary of the Washington Post, Barbara Ehrenreich goes searching for the ungood God in Ridley Scott's film Prometheus, Heather Havrilesky reads Fifty Shades of Grey, and Jim Newell investigates the strange and typical case of Adam Wheeler, the student fraud who fooled Harvard and, unlike the real culprits, went to jail.

No Future for You offers the counternarrative you've been missing, proof that dissent is alive and well in America. Please be warned, however. The writing that follows is polemical in nature. It may seek to persuade you of something.

Copublished with The Baffler.

Contributors
Chris Bray, Mark Dancey, Barbara Ehrenreich, Susan Faludi, Thomas Frank, Ann Friedman, James Griffioen, David Graeber, A. S. Hamrah, Heather Havrilesky, Chris Lehmann, Rhonda Lieberman, Anne Elizabeth Moore, Evgeny Morozov, Jim Newell, Rick Perlstein, John Summers, Maureen Tkacik

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