Mammals of North Africa and the Middle East

Bloomsbury Publishing
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This handy guide provides an introduction to more than 120 species of mammals found in North Africa and the Middle East. The authoritative text includes key facts about identification, habitat, behaviour, distribution and status, and each species is illustrated with colour photographs, including many never previously published.

Illustrated with clear colour photography and brief but authoritative descriptions the Pocket Photo Guides highlight the species of birds and animals from each region that the traveller is most likely to see, as well as those that are genuinely endemic (only to be seen in that country or region) or special rarities. The genuine pocket size allow the books to be carried around on trips and excursions and will take up minimal rucksack and suitcase space.
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About the author

Chris and Tilde Stuart, are best known for their mammal field guides. They have written many other books on the natural environment of Africa and are founders of the African Carnivore Research Programme and the African-Arabian Wildlife Research Centre.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Bloomsbury Publishing
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Published on
Mar 24, 2016
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Pages
144
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ISBN
9781472932419
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Nature / Animals / Mammals
Nature / General
Science / Natural History
Travel / Africa / North
Travel / Middle East / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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