The Theologian Slave Trader

Pneuma Springs Publishing
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A Personal commentary on Fredericus Svane Africanus' autobiography The Theologian Slave Trader explores the life of Fredericus Petersen, a mulatto adopted in 1710 by a Danish Lutheran Priest at Christiansborg Fort in what is now Ghana and who was subsequently brought back to Denmark as a teenager. The Danish king, no less, Frederik IV, was his godfather. Fredericus Petersen wrote a compelling autobiography which for many years has been largerly ignored. In The Theologian Slave Trader, Dr Christiana Oware Knudsen, herself a Ghanaian who for 50 years has lived in Denmark, brings this autobiography, The General Declaration, to life and contemporary relevance by contextualising Africanus' experience within a personal commentary on her personal family history in Ghana. Dr Knudsen approaches this historical material with the lively and engaging approach of an African story-teller, interweaving historical facts with family legends and documented impressions of the period. In so doing, she also poses a number of challenging contemporary questions about aspects of our understanding of slavery and inter-cultural relations. Book reviews online: PublishedBestsellers website.
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About the author

Christiana Oware Knudsen was born in the Gold Coast, now Ghana. As a young newly trained school teacher she met and married the Danish medical doctor, Peder K. K. Knudsen in Ghana in 1955. They had three children and then moved to Denmark. Christiana O. Knudsen holds a Cand. Phil. degree in Social Anthropology from the University of Aarhus, Denmark. She carried out research and published books about Female Circumcision in developing Ghana, THE FALLEN DAWADAWA TREE in 1994, and Tribal Markings in Ghana, THE PATTERNED SKIN, in 1996. She has also done research into Distant Spiritual Healing as Complementary to medical health care, and was awarded a Ph.D. degree at Derby University, UK. in 2001. In 2008 she published a satire about some Danish holiday makers and the extraordinary problems they encountered due to their excessive materialism. In 2010, she published the controversial book, "THE THEOLOGIAN SLAVE TRADER".
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Additional Information

Publisher
Pneuma Springs Publishing
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Published on
Oct 4, 2010
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Pages
196
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ISBN
9781907728006
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / General
History / Africa / General
Social Science / Slavery
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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New York Times Bestseller

“A profound impact on Hurston’s literary legacy.”—New York Times

“One of the greatest writers of our time.”—Toni Morrison

“Zora Neale Hurston’s genius has once again produced a Maestrapiece.”—Alice Walker

A major literary event: a newly published work from the author of the American classic Their Eyes Were Watching God, with a foreword from Pulitzer Prize-winning author Alice Walker, brilliantly illuminates the horror and injustices of slavery as it tells the true story of one of the last-known survivors of the Atlantic slave trade—abducted from Africa on the last "Black Cargo" ship to arrive in the United States.

In 1927, Zora Neale Hurston went to Plateau, Alabama, just outside Mobile, to interview eighty-six-year-old Cudjo Lewis. Of the millions of men, women, and children transported from Africa to America as slaves, Cudjo was then the only person alive to tell the story of this integral part of the nation’s history. Hurston was there to record Cudjo’s firsthand account of the raid that led to his capture and bondage fifty years after the Atlantic slave trade was outlawed in the United States.

In 1931, Hurston returned to Plateau, the African-centric community three miles from Mobile founded by Cudjo and other former slaves from his ship. Spending more than three months there, she talked in depth with Cudjo about the details of his life. During those weeks, the young writer and the elderly formerly enslaved man ate peaches and watermelon that grew in the backyard and talked about Cudjo’s past—memories from his childhood in Africa, the horrors of being captured and held in a barracoon for selection by American slavers, the harrowing experience of the Middle Passage packed with more than 100 other souls aboard the Clotilda, and the years he spent in slavery until the end of the Civil War.

Based on those interviews, featuring Cudjo’s unique vernacular, and written from Hurston’s perspective with the compassion and singular style that have made her one of the preeminent American authors of the twentieth-century, Barracoon masterfully illustrates the tragedy of slavery and of one life forever defined by it. Offering insight into the pernicious legacy that continues to haunt us all, black and white, this poignant and powerful work is an invaluable contribution to our shared history and culture.

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