The Theologian Slave Trader

Pneuma Springs Publishing
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A Personal commentary on Fredericus Svane Africanus' autobiography The Theologian Slave Trader explores the life of Fredericus Petersen, a mulatto adopted in 1710 by a Danish Lutheran Priest at Christiansborg Fort in what is now Ghana and who was subsequently brought back to Denmark as a teenager. The Danish king, no less, Frederik IV, was his godfather. Fredericus Petersen wrote a compelling autobiography which for many years has been largerly ignored. In The Theologian Slave Trader, Dr Christiana Oware Knudsen, herself a Ghanaian who for 50 years has lived in Denmark, brings this autobiography, The General Declaration, to life and contemporary relevance by contextualising Africanus' experience within a personal commentary on her personal family history in Ghana. Dr Knudsen approaches this historical material with the lively and engaging approach of an African story-teller, interweaving historical facts with family legends and documented impressions of the period. In so doing, she also poses a number of challenging contemporary questions about aspects of our understanding of slavery and inter-cultural relations. Book reviews online: PublishedBestsellers website.
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About the author

Christiana Oware Knudsen was born in the Gold Coast, now Ghana. As a young newly trained school teacher she met and married the Danish medical doctor, Peder K. K. Knudsen in Ghana in 1955. They had three children and then moved to Denmark. Christiana O. Knudsen holds a Cand. Phil. degree in Social Anthropology from the University of Aarhus, Denmark. She carried out research and published books about Female Circumcision in developing Ghana, THE FALLEN DAWADAWA TREE in 1994, and Tribal Markings in Ghana, THE PATTERNED SKIN, in 1996. She has also done research into Distant Spiritual Healing as Complementary to medical health care, and was awarded a Ph.D. degree at Derby University, UK. in 2001. In 2008 she published a satire about some Danish holiday makers and the extraordinary problems they encountered due to their excessive materialism. In 2010, she published the controversial book, "THE THEOLOGIAN SLAVE TRADER".
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Additional Information

Publisher
Pneuma Springs Publishing
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Published on
Oct 4, 2010
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Pages
196
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ISBN
9781907728006
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / General
History / Africa / General
Social Science / Slavery
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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The dramatic story of fugitive slaves and the antislavery activists who defied the law to help them reach freedom.

More than any other scholar, Eric Foner has influenced our understanding of America's history. Now, making brilliant use of extraordinary evidence, the Pulitzer Prize–winning historian once again reconfigures the national saga of American slavery and freedom.

A deeply entrenched institution, slavery lived on legally and commercially even in the northern states that had abolished it after the American Revolution. Slaves could be found in the streets of New York well after abolition, traveling with owners doing business with the city's major banks, merchants, and manufacturers. New York was also home to the North’s largest free black community, making it a magnet for fugitive slaves seeking refuge. Slave catchers and gangs of kidnappers roamed the city, seizing free blacks, often children, and sending them south to slavery.

To protect fugitives and fight kidnappings, the city's free blacks worked with white abolitionists to organize the New York Vigilance Committee in 1835. In the 1840s vigilance committees proliferated throughout the North and began collaborating to dispatch fugitive slaves from the upper South, Washington, and Baltimore, through Philadelphia and New York, to Albany, Syracuse, and Canada. These networks of antislavery resistance, centered on New York City, became known as the underground railroad. Forced to operate in secrecy by hostile laws, courts, and politicians, the city’s underground-railroad agents helped more than 3,000 fugitive slaves reach freedom between 1830 and 1860. Until now, their stories have remained largely unknown, their significance little understood.

Building on fresh evidence—including a detailed record of slave escapes secretly kept by Sydney Howard Gay, one of the key organizers in New York—Foner elevates the underground railroad from folklore to sweeping history. The story is inspiring—full of memorable characters making their first appearance on the historical stage—and significant—the controversy over fugitive slaves inflamed the sectional crisis of the 1850s. It eventually took a civil war to destroy American slavery, but here at last is the story of the courageous effort to fight slavery by "practical abolition," person by person, family by family.

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