Pilot's Pocket Decoder

McGraw Hill Professional
1
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Compact enough to slip into your flight ease and comrehensive enough to ensure master, of the daily parlance of pilots, this handy reference clarifies nearly 3,000 essential acronyms, abbreviations, symbols, technical terms, and slang definitions used in aviation. Completely up to date and categorically alphabetized, this crucial resource covers everything you need to know.
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About the author

Christopher J. Abbe (Saginaw, MI) is an airline pilot, with a B.S. in aviation technology and operations. Abbe has been flying since he soloed on his sixteenth birthday. He is a Gold Seal (CFI, CFII, MEI, AGI) flight instructor.
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Additional Information

Publisher
McGraw Hill Professional
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Published on
Jun 22, 1998
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Pages
224
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ISBN
9780071640473
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Language
English
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Genres
Technology & Engineering / Aeronautics & Astronautics
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Innovation in aerospace design and engineering is essential to meet the many challenges facing this sector. Innovation in aeronautics explores both a range of innovative ideas and how the process of innovation itself can be effectively managed.

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Do you fully understand all the data in your organization’s data resource? Can you readily find and easily access the data you need to support your business activities? If you find multiple sets of the same data, can you readily determine which is the most current and correct? No? Then consider this book essential reading. It will help you develop a high quality data resource that supports business needs. Data Resource Simplexity explains how a data resource goes disparate, how to stop that trend toward disparity, and how to develop a high quality, comparate data resource. It explains how to stop the costly business impacts of disparate data. It explains both the architectural and the cultural aspects of developing a comparate data resource. It explains how to manage data as a critical resource equivalent to the other critical resources of an organization—finances, human resource, and real property. Drawing from his nearly five decades of data management experience, plus his leveraging of theories, concepts, principles, and techniques from disciplines as diverse as human dynamics, mathematics, physics, agriculture, chemistry, and biology, Michael Brackett shows how you can transform your organization’s data resource into a trusted invaluable companion for both business and data management professionals. Chapter 1 reviews the trend toward rampant data resource disparity that exists in most public and private sector organizations today—why the data resource becomes complex. Chapter 2 introduces the basic concepts of planned data resource comparity—how to make the data resource elegant and simple. Chapter 3 presents the concepts, principles, and techniques of a Common Data Architecture within which all data in the organization are understood and managed. Chapters 4 through 8 present the five architectural aspects of data resource management. Chapter 4 explains the development of formal data names. Chapter 5 explains the development of comprehensive data definitions. Chapter 6 explains the development of proper data structures. Chapter 7 explains the development of precise data integrity rules. Chapter 8 explains the management of robust data documentation. Chapters 9 through 13 present the five cultural aspects of data resource management. Chapter 9 explains the development of a reasonable orientation for the data resource. Chapter 10 explains acceptable data availability to the business. Chapter 11 explains adequate data responsibility for the data resource. Chapter 12 explains an expanded data vision for managing the data resource. Chapter 13 explains how to achieve appropriate data recognition. Chapter 14 presents a summary explaining that development of a comparate data resource is a cultural choice of the organization and the need for a formal data resource management profession. From the Foreword, by Chris Potts, author of fruITion and recrEAtion: The challenge, as Michael observes in the very first chapter, is that you can’t actually administer, manage, or govern data, only people’s choices about data. This crucial and valuable insight - and what to do about it - is one of many that the author offers us from more than 40 years in the ‘data game’, as he calls it. Tellingly, he has looked outside of the data management discipline for some of the answers we need, thereby persuading us to innovate in our understanding of the problems we have with data, and of the solutions for dealing with those problems. My first corporate strategy role, back in the early 1990s, was in information architecture. As Michael recounts from his own experiences and others, in the intervening time, much has changed and nothing has changed. New business ideas and technologies come, and some old ones go. But truths survive. Data are assets, and we choose how to manage them. These are the essential truths on which good data management strategies will always be built.
The #1 New York Times bestseller from David McCullough, two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize—the dramatic story-behind-the-story about the courageous brothers who taught the world how to fly—Wilbur and Orville Wright.

On a winter day in 1903, in the Outer Banks of North Carolina, two brothers—bicycle mechanics from Dayton, Ohio—changed history. But it would take the world some time to believe that the age of flight had begun, with the first powered machine carrying a pilot.

Orville and Wilbur Wright were men of exceptional courage and determination, and of far-ranging intellectual interests and ceaseless curiosity. When they worked together, no problem seemed to be insurmountable. Wilbur was unquestionably a genius. Orville had such mechanical ingenuity as few had ever seen. That they had no more than a public high school education and little money never stopped them in their mission to take to the air. Nothing did, not even the self-evident reality that every time they took off, they risked being killed.

In this “enjoyable, fast-paced tale” (The Economist), master historian David McCullough “shows as never before how two Ohio boys from a remarkable family taught the world to fly” (The Washington Post) and “captures the marvel of what the Wrights accomplished” (The Wall Street Journal). He draws on the extensive Wright family papers to profile not only the brothers but their sister, Katharine, without whom things might well have gone differently for them. Essential reading, this is “a story of timeless importance, told with uncommon empathy and fluency…about what might be the most astonishing feat mankind has ever accomplished…The Wright Brothers soars” (The New York Times Book Review).
This memoir of a veteran NASA flight director tells riveting stories from the early days of the Mercury program through Apollo 11 (the moon landing) and Apollo 13, for both of which Kranz was flight director.

Gene Kranz was present at the creation of America’s manned space program and was a key player in it for three decades. As a flight director in NASA’s Mission Control, Kranz witnessed firsthand the making of history. He participated in the space program from the early days of the Mercury program to the last Apollo mission, and beyond. He endured the disastrous first years when rockets blew up and the United States seemed to fall further behind the Soviet Union in the space race. He helped to launch Alan Shepard and John Glenn, then assumed the flight director’s role in the Gemini program, which he guided to fruition. With his teammates, he accepted the challenge to carry out President John F. Kennedy’s commitment to land a man on the Moon before the end of the 1960s.

Kranz recounts these thrilling historic events and offers new information about the famous flights. What appeared as nearly flawless missions to the Moon were, in fact, a series of hair-raising near misses. When the space technology failed, as it sometimes did, the controllers’ only recourse was to rely on their skills and those of their teammates. He reveals behind-the-scenes details to demonstrate the leadership, discipline, trust, and teamwork that made the space program a success.

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