Good Trouble: Lessons from the Civil Rights Playbook

Abrams
Free sample

Good Trouble is the helpful antidote to all the pessimism and name-calling that is permeating today’s political and social dialogues. Revisiting episodes from the civil rights movement of the 1950s and ’60s, it highlights the essential lessons that modern-day activists and the civically minded can extract and embrace in order to move forward and create change. In words and vivid pen-and-watercolor illustrations, journalist Christopher Noxon dives into the real stories behind the front lines of the Montgomery bus boycott and the Greensboro lunch counter sit-ins and notable figures such as Rosa Parks and Bayard Rustin, all while exploring the parallels between the civil rights movement era and the present moment. This thoughtful, fresh approach is sure to inspire conversation, action, and, most importantly, hope.
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About the author

Christopher Noxon is a journalist who has written for the New Yorker, the New York Times Magazine, the Atlantic, Los Angeles Magazine, and Salon. He splits his time between Los Angeles and New York City.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Abrams
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Published on
Jan 8, 2019
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Pages
192
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ISBN
9781683353461
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Language
English
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Genres
History / United States / General
Self-Help / General
Social Science / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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This story of a Hollywood wife’s newfound fame and her husband’s new identity as her plus one is told with “wit, warmth and candor” (New York Times Sunday Book Review).
 
Alex Sherman-Zicklin is a mid-level marketing executive who never expected his wife’s fourteenth attempt at a TV pilot (about a housewife who runs a prostitution ring out of her suburban scrapbooking shop) to get produced. But now it’s been ordered to series and awarded an Emmy. Overnight, she’s sucked into a mad show-business vortex and he’s tasked with managing their new high-profile Hollywood lifestyle.
 
Equally sudden is Alex’s newfound place in a posse of Plus Ones—men who are married to women whose success, income, and public recognition far surpasses their own. Now he’s wondering how he can regain the foreground in his own life in this “well observed, honest, and laugh-out-loud funny” novel (Matthew Weiner, creator of Mad Men).
 
“Plus One is a smart and funny novel about Hollywood, but where it truly shines is in Noxon’s stunning and painfully accurate depiction of the complex rhythms and growing pains of a marriage.” —Jonathan Tropper, author of This Is Where I Leave You

“Behind every great man there’s a great woman . . . and in Noxon’s telling, behind every great woman there’s a charming, deeply conflicted guy (sometimes holding a very expensive handbag). Hilarious and unflinching, Plus One is a funny, sharply observed, heartbreaking look at love, power, and happily-ever-after in Hollywood.” —Jennifer Weiner, author of Who Do You Love, The Next Best Thing, and Good in Bed
 
“There are so many hilarious moments.” —Los Angeles Times
 
“For fans of Rainbow Rowell and similar keenly insightful truth tellers, this fresh male take on modern relationships is too smart, focused, and funny to pass up.” —Library Journal
 
“A brisk romp that’s sometimes laugh-out-loud funny as it deals with the serious issues of roles and communication in marriage.” —Booklist
 
“A funny, sharply observed novel about a guy with a first-world problem—a wife who’s a hugely successful TV writer and producer—and the identity crisis that goes along with it.” —Tom Perrotta, author of Election and The Leftovers
Once upon a time, boys and girls grew up and set aside childish things. Nowadays, moms and dads skateboard alongside their kids and download the latest pop-song ringtones. Captains of industry pose for the cover of BusinessWeek holding Super Soakers. The average age of video game players is twenty-nine and rising. Top chefs develop recipes for Easy-Bake Ovens. Disney World is the world’s top adult vacation destination (that’s adults without kids). And young people delay marriage and childbirth longer than ever in part to keep family obligations from interfering with their fun fun fun.

Christopher Noxon has coined a word for this new breed of grown-up: rejuveniles. And as a self-confessed rejuvenile, he’s a sympathetic yet critical guide to this bright and shiny world of people who see growing up as “winding down”—exchanging a life of playful flexibility for anxious days tending lawns and mutual funds.

In Rejuvenile, Noxon explores the historical roots of today’s rejuveniles (hint: all roads lead to Peter Pan), the “toyification” of practical devices (car cuteness is at an all-time high), and the new gospel of play. He talks to parents who love cartoons more than their children do, twenty-somethings who live happily with their parents, and grown-ups who evangelize on behalf of all-ages tag and Legos. And he takes on the “Harrumphing Codgers,” who see the rejuvenile as a threat to the social order.

Noxon tempers stories of his and others’ rejuvenile tendencies with cautionary notes about “lost souls whose taste for childish things is creepy at best.” (Exhibit A: Michael Jackson.) On balance, though, he sees rejuveniles as optimists and capital-R Romantics, people driven by a desire “to hold on to the part of ourselves that feels the most genuinely human. We believe in play, in make believe, in learning, in naps. And in a time of deep uncertainty, we trust that this deeper, more adaptable part of ourselves is our best tool of survival.”

Fresh and delightfully contrarian, Rejuvenile makes hilarious sense of this seismic culture change. It’s essential reading not only for grown-ups who refuse to “act their age,” but for those who wish they would just grow up.
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