$20 Per Gallon: How the Inevitable Rise in the Price of Gasoline Will Change Our Lives for the Better

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Imagine an everyday world in which the price of gasoline (and oil) continues to go up, and up, and up. Think about the immediate impact that would have on our lives.

Of course, everybody already knows how about gasoline has affected our driving habits. People can't wait to junk their gas-guzzling SUVs for a new Prius. But there are more, not-so-obvious changes on the horizon that Chris Steiner tracks brilliantly in this provocative work.

Consider the following societal changes: people who own homes in far-off suburbs will soon realize that there's no longer any market for their houses (reason: nobody wants to live too far away because it's too expensive to commute to work). Telecommuting will begin to expand rapidly. Trains will become the mode of national transportation (as it used to be) as the price of flying becomes prohibitive. Families will begin to migrate southward as the price of heating northern homes in the winter is too pricey. Cheap everyday items that are comprised of plastic will go away because of the rising price to produce them (plastic is derived from oil). And this is just the beginning of a huge and overwhelming domino effect that our way of life will undergo in the years to come.

Steiner, an engineer by training before turning to journalism, sees how this simple but constant rise in oil and gas prices will totally re-structure our lifestyle. But what may be surprising to readers is that all of these changes may not be negative - but actually will usher in some new and very promising aspects of our society.

Steiner will probe how the liberation of technology and innovation, triggered by climbing gas prices, will change our lives. The book may start as an alarmist's exercise.... but don't be misled. The future will be exhilarating.
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About the author

Christopher Steiner is an author and staff writer for Forbes magazine, often writing on energy, technology and innovative entrepreneurs. His research has led him to his first book, $20 Per Gallon: How the Rising Cost of Gasoline Will Radically Change Our Lives, which was published in June 2009. Steiner received his B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1999. In 2003, he received his M.S. in Journalism from Northwestern University. He has worked as a civil and design engineer and also as a Staff Reporter for the Chicago Tribune. Steiner lives with his wife, Sarah, and son, Jackson, in Evanston, Illinois.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Grand Central Publishing
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Published on
Jul 15, 2009
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Pages
288
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ISBN
9780446562027
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Social Science / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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In this fascinating, frightening book, Christopher Steiner tells the story of how algorithms took over—and shows why the “bot revolution” is about to spill into every aspect of our lives, often silently, without our knowledge.

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