Doing Action Research: A Guide for School Support Staff

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'The clear intention of the authors is to motivate, persuade and give confidence to those who might otherwise think that research can only be carried out by teams of university staff' - ESCalate

Most Teaching Assistants (TAs) studying for Foundation Degrees need to do Action Research projects.

This book acts as an introduction to research methods, and will be especially useful if you are doing such work for the first time. It:

" introduces the basic principles and practice of research methods;

" provides an overview of the processes involved in Action Research;

" shows you how to identify an issue, design and carry out a course of action and evaluate the impact of this action;

" uses real case studies from practising TAs.

The content of the book relates to both Early Years and Primary settings, and there are case studies from a variety of settings.

Anyone studying for a Foundation Degree, or working towards HLTA status, will find this book meets their needs.

Claire Taylor is Programme Leader for the Foundation Degree at Bishop Grosseteste College, Lincoln. Min Wilkie is Programme Leader for the Foundation Degree in Educational Studies for Teaching Assistants at the University of Leicester. Judith Baser has worked in a wide range of educational settings, including 5 years as a teaching assistant. More recently, she has run training courses for teaching assistants in ways to support children's learning and development.

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About the author

Claire is a member of the Senior Leadership Team and leads the Academic Engagement Hub. The Hub contains the Centre for Educational Development and Research (CEDaR), Library Services, Student Support and Learning Advice, Student Recruitment and Admissions, Quality Assurance and Student Data, and International work. Claire joined BG in 2002 having been a Primary Headteacher and since then she has held a variety of roles including ITT Lecturer, Programme Leader and Head of Learning and Teaching. Claire is a Bishop Grosseteste Teaching Fellow, a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) and a Fellow of the Staff and Educational Developers' Association (SEDA).

Before joining the School of Education, Min worked for many years as a teacher, mostly in Nursery and Key Stage 1 settings, but also with Key Stage 2 and with Year 9, 10 and 11 pupils. She additionally worked for Leicester College where she developed both the Cache Specialist Teacher Assistant Award and the Btec HNC/D Early Childhood Studies, targeting professional development for Nursery Nurses. Here at the School of Education, Min is committed to the development of the Foundation Degree in Educational Studies, designing course content and materials, and assessments to enable mature, talented people working in schools to attain a professionally recognised status, and move toward teaching if they wish. She is the Programme Leader, Course Co-ordinator and Admissions Tutor for this programme.

Judith Baser originally studied German and French, and spent the early part of her career working as a commercial translator in industry and as a freelancer. Her career in education has mainly involved working with adults in a variety of settings, teaching modern foreign languages and basic skills, and providing learning support in Further Education settings for students with dyslexia and English as an Additional Language.

During a secondment to an Education Action Zone, Judith set up and managed a project developing training for school support staff. Working for several years as a Teaching Assistant in a primary school during an earlier career break gave her a useful insight in the role of support staff and their work in schools and their importance in fostering children's learning. She also developed and ran adults basic education courses for parents in schools.

Judith joined the School of Education at Leicester in 2003, and is responsible for managing and teaching the Foundation Degree in Educational Studies. She has developed several of the Foundation modules and continues to work on updating these to reflect current trends in education.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SAGE
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Published on
Sep 18, 2006
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Pages
112
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ISBN
9781847878243
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / Research
Reference / Research
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Claire Taylor
Poverty in fifth- and fourth-century BCE Athens was a markedly different concept to that with which we are familiar today. Reflecting contemporary ideas about labour, leisure, and good citizenship, the 'poor' were considered to be not only those who were destitute, or those who were living at the borders of subsistence, but also those who were moderately well-off but had to work for a living. Defined in this way, this group covered around 99 per cent of the population of Athens. This conception of penia (poverty) was also ideologically charged: the poor were contrasted with the rich and found, for the most part, to be both materially and morally deficient. Poverty, Wealth, and Well-Being sets out to rethink what it meant to be poor in a world where this was understood as the need to work for a living, exploring the discourses that constructed poverty as something to fear and linking them with experiences of penia among different social groups in Athens. Drawing on current research into and debates around poverty within the social sciences, it provides a critical reassessment of poverty in democratic Athens and argues that it need not necessarily be seen in terms of these elitist ideological categories, nor indeed solely as an economic condition (the state of having no wealth), but that it should also be understood in terms of social relations, capabilities, and well-being. In developing a framework to analyse the complexities of poverty so conceived and exploring the discourses that shaped it, the volume reframes poverty as being dynamic and multidimensional, and provides a valuable insight into what the poor in Athens - men and women, citizen and non-citizen, slave and free - were able to do or to be.
Frank Bruni
Claire Taylor
Poverty in fifth- and fourth-century BCE Athens was a markedly different concept to that with which we are familiar today. Reflecting contemporary ideas about labour, leisure, and good citizenship, the 'poor' were considered to be not only those who were destitute, or those who were living at the borders of subsistence, but also those who were moderately well-off but had to work for a living. Defined in this way, this group covered around 99 per cent of the population of Athens. This conception of penia (poverty) was also ideologically charged: the poor were contrasted with the rich and found, for the most part, to be both materially and morally deficient. Poverty, Wealth, and Well-Being sets out to rethink what it meant to be poor in a world where this was understood as the need to work for a living, exploring the discourses that constructed poverty as something to fear and linking them with experiences of penia among different social groups in Athens. Drawing on current research into and debates around poverty within the social sciences, it provides a critical reassessment of poverty in democratic Athens and argues that it need not necessarily be seen in terms of these elitist ideological categories, nor indeed solely as an economic condition (the state of having no wealth), but that it should also be understood in terms of social relations, capabilities, and well-being. In developing a framework to analyse the complexities of poverty so conceived and exploring the discourses that shaped it, the volume reframes poverty as being dynamic and multidimensional, and provides a valuable insight into what the poor in Athens - men and women, citizen and non-citizen, slave and free - were able to do or to be.
Claire Taylor
This volume explores women’s literary and cultural production in Latin America, and suggests how such works engage with discourses of identity, nationhood, and gender. Including contributions by several prominent Latin American scholars themselves, it seeks to provide a vital insight into the analysis and reception of the works in a local context, and foster debate between Latin American and metropolitan academics.

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The second section, Models and Genres, consists of six chapters that examine how women writers engage with, and critically re-work, existing literary discourses and paradigms. Considering phenomena such as detective fiction, fairy-tales, and classical mythological figures, the chapters illustrate how these genres and models–frequently coded as masculine–are given new inflections, both as a result of their deployment by women, and as a result of their re-working in a Latin American context.

Claire Taylor
Poverty in fifth- and fourth-century BCE Athens was a markedly different concept to that with which we are familiar today. Reflecting contemporary ideas about labour, leisure, and good citizenship, the 'poor' were considered to be not only those who were destitute, or those who were living at the borders of subsistence, but also those who were moderately well-off but had to work for a living. Defined in this way, this group covered around 99 per cent of the population of Athens. This conception of penia (poverty) was also ideologically charged: the poor were contrasted with the rich and found, for the most part, to be both materially and morally deficient. Poverty, Wealth, and Well-Being sets out to rethink what it meant to be poor in a world where this was understood as the need to work for a living, exploring the discourses that constructed poverty as something to fear and linking them with experiences of penia among different social groups in Athens. Drawing on current research into and debates around poverty within the social sciences, it provides a critical reassessment of poverty in democratic Athens and argues that it need not necessarily be seen in terms of these elitist ideological categories, nor indeed solely as an economic condition (the state of having no wealth), but that it should also be understood in terms of social relations, capabilities, and well-being. In developing a framework to analyse the complexities of poverty so conceived and exploring the discourses that shaped it, the volume reframes poverty as being dynamic and multidimensional, and provides a valuable insight into what the poor in Athens - men and women, citizen and non-citizen, slave and free - were able to do or to be.
Claire Taylor
Poverty in fifth- and fourth-century BCE Athens was a markedly different concept to that with which we are familiar today. Reflecting contemporary ideas about labour, leisure, and good citizenship, the 'poor' were considered to be not only those who were destitute, or those who were living at the borders of subsistence, but also those who were moderately well-off but had to work for a living. Defined in this way, this group covered around 99 per cent of the population of Athens. This conception of penia (poverty) was also ideologically charged: the poor were contrasted with the rich and found, for the most part, to be both materially and morally deficient. Poverty, Wealth, and Well-Being sets out to rethink what it meant to be poor in a world where this was understood as the need to work for a living, exploring the discourses that constructed poverty as something to fear and linking them with experiences of penia among different social groups in Athens. Drawing on current research into and debates around poverty within the social sciences, it provides a critical reassessment of poverty in democratic Athens and argues that it need not necessarily be seen in terms of these elitist ideological categories, nor indeed solely as an economic condition (the state of having no wealth), but that it should also be understood in terms of social relations, capabilities, and well-being. In developing a framework to analyse the complexities of poverty so conceived and exploring the discourses that shaped it, the volume reframes poverty as being dynamic and multidimensional, and provides a valuable insight into what the poor in Athens - men and women, citizen and non-citizen, slave and free - were able to do or to be.
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