Tibet: The Lost Frontier

Lancer Publishers LLC
Free sample

 Delving deep into the history of the Roof of the World, this book introduces us to one of the greatest tragedies of modern times, its principal characters as well as the forces impelling them, consciously or unconsciously.

The main ‘knot’ of our ‘drama’ was staged in 1950. During this ‘fateful’ year the dice of fate was thrown. There are turning points in history when it is possible for events to go one way or the other — when the tides of time seem poised between the flood and the ebb, when fate awaits our choice to strike its glorious or sombre note, and the destiny of an entire nation hangs in balance.

The year 1950 was certainly one such crucial year in the destinies of India, Tibet and China. The three nations had the choice of moving towards peace and collaboration, or tension and confrontation.

Decisions can be made with all good intentions — as in the case of Nehru who believed in an ‘eternal friendship’ with China, or with uncharitable motives of Mao. Decisions can be made out of weakness, greed, pragmatism, ignorance or fear; but once an option is excercised, consequences unfold for years and decades to follow.

In strategic terms, Tibet is critical to South Asia and South-east Asia. Rather the Tibetan plateau holds the key to the peace, security and well being of Asia, and the world as such. This study of the history of Tibet, a nation sandwiched between two giant neighbours, will enable better understanding of the geopolitics influencing the tumultuous relations between India and China, particularly in the backdrop of border disputes and recent events in Tibet.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Lancer Publishers LLC
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Published on
Dec 31, 2008
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Pages
368
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ISBN
9781935501497
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Language
English
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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As the aspirations of the two rising Asian powers collide, the China-India rivalry is likely to shape twenty-first-century international politics in the region and far beyond.

This volume by T.V. Paul and an international group of leading scholars examines whether the rivalry between the two countries that began in the 1950s will intensify or dissipate in the twenty-first century. The China-India relationship is important to analyze because past experience has shown that when two rising great powers share a border, the relationship is volatile and potentially dangerous. India and China’s relationship faces a number of challenges, including multiple border disputes that periodically flare up, division over the status of Tibet and the Dalai Lama, the strategic challenge to India posed by China's close relationship with Pakistan, the Chinese navy's greater presence in the Indian Ocean, and the two states’ competition for natural resources. Despite these irritants, however, both countries agree on issues such as global financial reforms and climate change and have much to gain from increasing trade and investment, so there are reasons for optimism as well as pessimism.

The contributors to this volume answer the following questions: What explains the peculiar contours of this rivalry? What influence does accelerated globalization, especially increased trade and investment, have on this rivalry? What impact do US-China competition and China’s expanding navy have on this rivalry? Under what conditions will it escalate or end? The China-India Rivalry in the Globalization Era will be of great interest to students, scholars, and policymakers concerned with Indian and Chinese foreign policy and Asian security.

This book analyses the structure of the India–China relationship and the two prominent powers’ positions with and against each other, bilaterally and globally, in a complex Asian environment and beyond. India and China’s perceptions of one another are evaluated to reveal how the order of Asia is influenced by engaging in different power equations that affect equilibrium and disequilibrium.

Contributors address three critical perspectives of India and China in Asia which are increasingly shaping the future of Asia and impacting the Indo-Pacific power balance. First, they examine the mutual perceptions of India and China as an integral part of Asia’s evolving politics and the impact of this on the emerging Asian order and disorder. Second, they assess how classical and contemporary characteristics of the India–China boundary and beyond-border disputes or conflicts are shaping Asia’s political trajectory and leaving an impact on the Indo-Pacific region. Additionally, contributors observe the prevailing power equations in which India and China are currently engaged to reveal that they are not only geographically limited to the Asian region. Instead, having a strong global or intercontinental character attached to it, the India–China relationship involves extra-territorial powers and extra-territorial regions.

This book will be of interest to academics, students and policymakers working on Asian studies, international relations, area studies, emerging powers studies, strategic studies, security studies and conflict studies.

'Is India a friend, rival or enemy?' This was the question journalist Reshma Patil asked the people she met on her journeys through China where she set up the first China bureau of the Hindustan Times. As she travelled from government-run think-tanks to universities where the country's future policymakers are being groomed, or to state-run newsrooms and economic zones attracting their first-ever Indian investors, the responses that she received ranged from uncomfortable silence to blank stares and frowns. The rarest response was friend, equally so was enemy. More than five decades since the month-long border war in 1962, mutual ignorance and prejudice define the relations between India and China. The two countries have differences over strategic issues beyond the border and Pakistan, including the Indian Ocean and South China Sea. The coming decade, with new governments in China in 2013 and in India in 2014, will be a crucial indicator of whether these neighbours move further apart or better manage their differences. Strangers across the Border: Indian Encounters in Boomtown China captures with a reporter's acuity the twin strategies of cooperation and competition that shape Beijing's India policy and Chinese ideas of India. From software parks where techies lesser skilled than their Indian counterparts in Bengaluru demand higher salaries, to factories where Hindu idols are churned out in the thousands for sale in India, Reshma Patil traces the many spaces where India and China struggle to converge or threaten to collide. The state-run newspaper Global Times tries to mobilize public sentiment against India with its provocative articles; the Chinese police call unannounced at her apartment to check her visa papers. But the simple acts of everyday life that she encounters - like being saved from being questioned by the border police by a woman taxi driver, or the young beauty queen who lives on the Gandhian principle of ahimsa, a spiritual need in an atheist regime, or the wise professor who encourages his students to rethink the repressive one-child policy - make her journey much more than a simple journalistic enquiry. Finely balanced between the political and the personal, this is a nuanced account of a relationship that continues to be an enigma which, if unravelled, could change the future of 2.5 billion people.
 There was a change of Government in India in May 2014 which galvanised a rather insipid Foreign Policy. The Prime Minister’s (PM) visit to the neighbouring countries and the Foreign Minister covering those where he was not able to go created a new dynamic in the neighbourly relations. However, Pakistan due to its Army shadowing the Civilian Government presents a unique dilemma in progressing bilateral relations. China surprisingly put across contradictory signals due to the actions of the Peoples Liberation Army on the Line of Actual Control during the visit of the President to India. These present a dilemma to the Indian Government and are covered in the Comment by Lt Gen Jiti Bajwa.

 

Gp Capt Joseph Noronha looks at the future of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles followed by Gp Capt B Menon presenting the need for developing weapon systems for the Air Force in the near future.  Air Marshal PV Naik views National security in a holistic perspective.  

 

The visit of the PM to Japan has been succulently analysed in the strategic dimension by Dr S Roy Chaudhary. The Chinese President’s visit in the first year of his term coinciding with that of the Indian PM was looked at with much anticipation, the nuances of the visit has been persuasively covered by Claude Arpi.

 

Lt Gen Gautam Banerjee interprets the Pakistan nuclear rhetoric in a realistic geopolitical setting.

 

Consequent to Boeing of USA successfully test flying a retired F 16 fighter aircraft in an unmanned mode Sqn Ldr Vijendra Thakur studied the possibility of Chinese Air Force utilising similar modification to their hordes of retired Migs.

 

The outcome is a surreal scenario. Maj Gen AK Chadha has ventured in to Cyberspace and looks at the military possibilities in this ‘No Man’s Land’ most comprehensively.

 

Our Special Correspondent has looked at two connected issues Revolution in Military Affairs (RMA) and India’s Defence Industrial complex. Rear Adm AP Revi analyses the consequences of a depleting submarine fleet of the Indian Navy.

 

Priya Tyagi covers the latest defence news and Col Danvir Singh reports of his visit to France presenting the FREMM multi-mission Frigate by DCNS. 
 Two issues that dominated the debates of the strategic community in the first quarter of this year were; ‘Make in India’ energetically marketed at the Aero-India Show and the Defence Budget.

The Defence Budget is looked at intently to get the general emphasis of the government on security. Brig Gurmeet Kanwal has debated this lucidly. Maintaining a large standing armed force requires more than mere day-to-day support. An ill-equipped large force mired with equipment hollowness is not a guarantee for security but in a future war will be cannon fodder for the adversary. Someone will have to be held accountable to the nation for this debilitating lapse. Or take a conscious decision to reduce its size if this country cannot afford a well equipped large armed force!!! Preparing an armed force on a long-term basis requires a deeply considered perspective of its future role in the national security scheme and the road map for its implementation. The absence of a doctrine and the hesitation of establishing a single point of contact on all matters military have been well debated in this issue. Generals Harwant and Banerjee and Colonel Achutan look at the aspects of doctrine.

‘Make in India’ has been the didactic theme of this Government. It needs to be spelt out in clear terms and not left to the (mis-)interpretation of the bureaucracy. Make in India will be feasible only when the basic industrial manufacturing has notched up a number of counts and the manpower skills to go with it are matching. Currently it is more theoretical than implementable. The articles Dr Misra, Air Marshal Kukreja and Group Captain Noronha address these issues with particular reference to the aero-space industry.

Two articles relate to the major current event on PM Modi’s visit to China; the first is on Tibet and the second on the boundary issue. Cyber space is emerging the next frontier; Gen Davinder Kumar has generated an excellent discussion on the issue. Col Harjeet has looked at the implications of social media on security. As a first Claude Arpi has documented a diary highlighting prominent issues relating to China’s PLA in this first quarter. This will now be a regular feature in the print edition.

Wishing all our readers a worthwhile professionally invigorating reading experience.
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