The Australian Wine Guide

Hospitality Books
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The Australian Wine Guide 6th edition covers types and styles of wine, wine production, tasting and serving wine. It teaches you about developing your palate, interpreting a wine label and local and international wine styles. Wine and food matching and Australian geographical regions have been completely updated and expanded. Leading Australian winemakers offer their thoughts on wine regions and grape varieties. Over 1,000 wines were tasted over eighteen months for inclusion into the new edition and wines have been rated into three categories – Outstanding, Highly Recommended and Recommended; providing an essential guide for your journey into the world of wine.

What the critics have said about previous print editions:

"Clive Hartley has produced an excellent book - comprehensive, easy to read, packed with information and takes a global view" Huon Hooke, Sydney Morning Herald.

"The book contains an immense amount of information, augmented by strong photographic content" James Halliday, The Australian.
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About the author

Former restaurateur, sommelier and wine consultant, Clive Hartley has been a full time wine educator in Australia for over 20 years, travelling extensively to wine regions in Australia and internationally. Clive is currently the Course Director for the prestigious Sydney Wine Academy, one of the largest providers of Wine and Spirit Education Trust (WSET) courses in Australia. Clive has a regular column in Winestate Magazine and has judged wine shows both in Australia and overseas.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Hospitality Books
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Published on
Mar 27, 2017
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Pages
272
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ISBN
9780977591268
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Language
English
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Genres
Cooking / Beverages / Alcoholic / Wine
Education / Vocational
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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