The Forcing Of The Merderet Causeway At La Fiere, France: An Action By The Third Battalion 325th Glider Infantry [Illustrated Edition]

Pickle Partners Publishing
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Contains 6 maps and illustrations.
As the tens of thousands of American troops began their approach toward the forbidding German-defended Normandy coast, their comrades in the 82nd and 101st Airborne divisions had already flown over the Channel and began dropping and gliding into enemy territory. The Airborne Divisions had a role critical to the success of the entire Normandy Landings; beyond the initial beach landing areas were miles of flooded defended ditches and waterways. If the German troops managed to defend these bottlenecks the Americans on Utah Beach, at the extreme right of the operation, would be unable to move forward and might have foundered on the beach. The American airborne troops, like their British and Canadian compatriots on the left flank, were the elite of their respective armies and expected that their unique battle skills would enable them to deal with any tough mission that was bound to come their way.
One such waterway was the Meredet river and its important bridge, this objective was handed to the troops of the 325th Glider Infantry who would wing their way in flimsy and dangerous gliders. As the brave 325th rushed the bridge they knew that their trial had only just begun; cut-off from their own troops on the beaches, lightly armed and surrounded by Germans who would try and respond to their capture of the pivotal bridge.
S L A Marshall, the Official Historian for the European Theatre of Operations, interviewed the men of the 325th on their return to the U.K. and from this collected material set about recording this story of their courage, dedication and fighting skill.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Pickle Partners Publishing
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Published on
Aug 15, 2014
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Pages
45
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ISBN
9781782893516
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Europe / General
History / Europe / Germany
History / Military / Special Forces
History / Military / United States
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Includes six maps.
This is actual story of parent regiment of the famous “Band of Brothers” Easy company.
As the tens of thousands of American troops began their approach toward the forbidding German-defended Normandy coast, their comrades in the 82nd and 101st Airborne divisions had already flown over the Channel and began dropping and gliding into enemy territory. The Airborne Divisions had a role critical to the success of the entire Normandy Landings; beyond the initial beach landing areas were miles of flooded defended ditches and waterways. If the German troops managed to defend these bottlenecks the Americans on Utah Beach, at the extreme right of the operation, would be unable to move forward and might have foundered on the beach.
The capture and retention of the two southernmost exits were assigned to the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment; the plan was well thought-out and would have in all likelihood have succeeded handsomely. However the drop of the 506th like many of their comrades on D-Day was wide and scattered all across the Normandy landscape. As groups of paratroops nervously grouped together in the darkness they started small actions against whatever German positions that they came across; as officers and NCOs struggled to gain some control over the chaos the most organized moved toward their objectives. They bravely pushed forward toward their targets and held them against the rising numbers of German reinforcements; before the major link-up with the beach landings they fought and won the engagement at St-Mairie-Du-Comt against their toughest enemies, the German paratroops.
S L A Marshall, the Official Historian for the European Theatre of Operations, interviewed the men of the 506th on their return to the U.K. and from this collected material set about recording this story of their courage, dedication and fighting skill.
Includes 6 maps
As the tens of thousands of American troops began their approach toward the forbidding German-defended Normandy coast, their comrades in the 82nd and 101st Airborne divisions had already flown over the Channel and began dropping and gliding into enemy territory. The Airborne Divisions had a role critical to the success of the entire Normandy Landings; beyond the initial beach landing areas were miles of flooded defended ditches and waterways. If the German troops managed to defend these bottlenecks the Americans on Utah Beach, at the extreme right of the operation, would be unable to move forward and might have foundered on the beach...
“According to plan, the D Day objectives of the 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment were well concentrated. After dropping into Normandy a little to the north and east of the city of Carentan, the regiment was to press south and westward and establish the defensive position in this direction. In detail, it was to secure the line of the lower Douve River, first by seizing the strategic lock on the Canal De Vire Et Taute at Le Barquette and then by blowing the river bridges...
“From the beginning, American attention was directed at the Le Barquette lock. This unique objective and its possible military application appears to have fascinated the imaginations not only of those who planned Operation Neptune but of the commanders who were to execute it. To get to the lock first and to make certain that the enemy would have no use of it became an overriding consideration with the planning and tactical forces. American apprehensions as to what might happen if the Germans gained control of the lock superinduced one of the boldest strokes of the Normandy campaign, a stroke boldly made and tactically productive. Yet whether the emphasis placed on the position by the Allied planners was justifiable was never confirmed by the attitude of the enemy.”
Navy SEAL Marcus Luttrell returned from his star-crossed mission in Afghanistan with his bones shattered and his heart broken. So many had given their lives to save him-and he would have readily done the same for them. As he recuperated, he wondered why he and others, from America's founding to today, had been willing to sacrifice everything-including themselves-for the sake of family, nation, and freedom.

In Service, we follow Marcus Luttrell to Iraq, where he returns to the battlefield as a member of SEAL Team 5 to help take on the most dangerous city in the world: Ramadi, the capital of war-torn Al Anbar Province. There, in six months of high-intensity urban combat, he would be part of what has been called the greatest victory in the history of U.S. Special Operations forces. We also return to Afghanistan and Operation Redwing, where Luttrell offers powerful new details about his miraculous rescue. Throughout, he reflects on what it really means to take on a higher calling, about the men he's seen lose their lives for their country, and the legacy of those who came and bled before.

A thrilling war story, Service is also a profoundly moving tribute to the warrior brotherhood, to the belief that nobody goes it alone, and no one will be left behind.
Navy SEAL Marcus Luttrell returned from his star-crossed mission in Afghanistan with his bones shattered and his heart broken. So many had given their lives to save him-and he would have readily done the same for them. As he recuperated, he wondered why he and others, from America's founding to today, had been willing to sacrifice everything-including themselves-for the sake of family, nation, and freedom.

In Service, we follow Marcus Luttrell to Iraq, where he returns to the battlefield as a member of SEAL Team 5 to help take on the most dangerous city in the world: Ramadi, the capital of war-torn Al Anbar Province. There, in six months of high-intensity urban combat, he would be part of what has been called the greatest victory in the history of U.S. Special Operations forces. We also return to Afghanistan and Operation Redwing, where Luttrell offers powerful new details about his miraculous rescue. Throughout, he reflects on what it really means to take on a higher calling, about the men he's seen lose their lives for their country, and the legacy of those who came and bled before.

A thrilling war story, Service is also a profoundly moving tribute to the warrior brotherhood, to the belief that nobody goes it alone, and no one will be left behind.
Includes six maps.
This is actual story of parent regiment of the famous “Band of Brothers” Easy company.
As the tens of thousands of American troops began their approach toward the forbidding German-defended Normandy coast, their comrades in the 82nd and 101st Airborne divisions had already flown over the Channel and began dropping and gliding into enemy territory. The Airborne Divisions had a role critical to the success of the entire Normandy Landings; beyond the initial beach landing areas were miles of flooded defended ditches and waterways. If the German troops managed to defend these bottlenecks the Americans on Utah Beach, at the extreme right of the operation, would be unable to move forward and might have foundered on the beach.
The capture and retention of the two southernmost exits were assigned to the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment; the plan was well thought-out and would have in all likelihood have succeeded handsomely. However the drop of the 506th like many of their comrades on D-Day was wide and scattered all across the Normandy landscape. As groups of paratroops nervously grouped together in the darkness they started small actions against whatever German positions that they came across; as officers and NCOs struggled to gain some control over the chaos the most organized moved toward their objectives. They bravely pushed forward toward their targets and held them against the rising numbers of German reinforcements; before the major link-up with the beach landings they fought and won the engagement at St-Mairie-Du-Comt against their toughest enemies, the German paratroops.
S L A Marshall, the Official Historian for the European Theatre of Operations, interviewed the men of the 506th on their return to the U.K. and from this collected material set about recording this story of their courage, dedication and fighting skill.
Includes 6 maps
As the tens of thousands of American troops began their approach toward the forbidding German-defended Normandy coast, their comrades in the 82nd and 101st Airborne divisions had already flown over the Channel and began dropping and gliding into enemy territory. The Airborne Divisions had a role critical to the success of the entire Normandy Landings; beyond the initial beach landing areas were miles of flooded defended ditches and waterways. If the German troops managed to defend these bottlenecks the Americans on Utah Beach, at the extreme right of the operation, would be unable to move forward and might have foundered on the beach...
“According to plan, the D Day objectives of the 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment were well concentrated. After dropping into Normandy a little to the north and east of the city of Carentan, the regiment was to press south and westward and establish the defensive position in this direction. In detail, it was to secure the line of the lower Douve River, first by seizing the strategic lock on the Canal De Vire Et Taute at Le Barquette and then by blowing the river bridges...
“From the beginning, American attention was directed at the Le Barquette lock. This unique objective and its possible military application appears to have fascinated the imaginations not only of those who planned Operation Neptune but of the commanders who were to execute it. To get to the lock first and to make certain that the enemy would have no use of it became an overriding consideration with the planning and tactical forces. American apprehensions as to what might happen if the Germans gained control of the lock superinduced one of the boldest strokes of the Normandy campaign, a stroke boldly made and tactically productive. Yet whether the emphasis placed on the position by the Allied planners was justifiable was never confirmed by the attitude of the enemy.”
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