A Deadly Game of Tug of War: The Kelsey Smith-Briggs Story

Morgan James Publishing
7
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Kelsey was a bubbly ray of sunshine. It is impossible to comprehend how anyone could harm a child, much less have something happen when so many were watching so closely. The lesson from Kelsey's death is not only a cry to stop child abuse, but a reminder to cherish the little ones in our lives, and a warning to those embroiled in custody battles to take the focus off themselves and put it where it belongs, on the innocent children who did not ask to be a pawn in someone's game.
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About the author

Judge Craig Key began practicing law in 1992. He was sworn in as Associate District Judge of Lincoln County on January 13, 2003, and lost the re-election in 2006, due to the circumstances surrounding the death of a child, as detailed in A Deadly Game of Tug of War. Craig has gone back to practicing law in Lincoln County and has a wife, Dana, and a blended family with four daughters: Abbi (14), Macy (13), Sarah (12), and Kamryn (8).

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Additional Information

Publisher
Morgan James Publishing
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Published on
Feb 1, 2008
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Pages
168
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ISBN
9781600379567
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Language
English
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Genres
Law / Child Advocacy
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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