Biotechnology Entrepreneurship: Starting, Managing, and Leading Biotech Companies

Academic Press
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As an authoritative guide to biotechnology enterprise and entrepreneurship, Biotechnology Entrepreneurship and Management supports the international community in training the biotechnology leaders of tomorrow.

Outlining fundamental concepts vital to graduate students and practitioners entering the biotech industry in management or in any entrepreneurial capacity, Biotechnology Entrepreneurship and Management provides tested strategies and hard-won lessons from a leading board of educators and practitioners.

It provides a ‘how-to’ for individuals training at any level for the biotech industry, from macro to micro. Coverage ranges from the initial challenge of translating a technology idea into a working business case, through securing angel investment, and in managing all aspects of the result: business valuation, business development, partnering, biological manufacturing, FDA approvals and regulatory requirements.

An engaging and user-friendly style is complemented by diverse diagrams, graphics and business flow charts with decision trees to support effective management and decision making.

  • Provides tested strategies and lessons in an engaging and user-friendly style supplemented by tailored pedagogy, training tips and overview sidebars
  • Case studies are interspersed throughout each chapter to support key concepts and best practices.
  • Enhanced by use of numerous detailed graphics, tables and flow charts
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About the author

Dr. Craig Shimasaki is a scientist, businessperson, and serial entrepreneur, with over 30 years of biotechnology industry experience starting his career at Genentech. He co-founded four companies and also teaches biotechnology entrepreneurship at the University of Oklahoma. His desire is to teach and train future entrepreneurial leaders how to be successful.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Academic Press
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Published on
Apr 8, 2014
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Pages
488
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ISBN
9780124047471
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Management
Medical / Reference
Science / Biotechnology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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