Mutiny at the Margins: New Perspectives on the Indian Uprising of 1857

Mutiny at the Margins

Book 7
SAGE Publications India
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The Mutiny at the Margins series takes a fresh look at the revolt of 1857 from original and unusual perspectives, focusing in particular on neglected socially marginal groups and geographic areas which have hitherto tended to be unrepresented in studies of this cataclysmic event in British imperial and Indian historiography.

Documents of the Indian Uprising (Volume 7) is a source book that provides samples from rare documents unearthed in the course of extensive research conducted during the Mutiny at the Margins project. Both a research tool and a teaching resource, it employs images and texts to offer a unique range of primary sources relating to the 1857 uprising, its aftermath and legacies. Emphasising subaltern and marginal perspectives, it is designed to complement the previous six volumes of the series.

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About the author

Crispin Bates is Professor of Modern and Contemporary South Asian History in the School of History, Classics and Archaeology, University of Edinburgh and ‘former director’ of the University’s Centre for South Asian Studies. He has published extensively on tribal, peasant and labour history in India and the history of Indian overseas migration. His publications include Subalterns and Raj: South Asia since 1600 (2007); (with Subho Basu) Rethinking Indian Political Institutions (2005), Beyond Representation: Constructions of Identity in Colonial and Postcolonial India (2005), and (with Alpa Shah) Savage Attack: Tribal Insurgency in India (2014). Between 2006 and 2008, he was the Principal Investigator in a major Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC)-funded research project concerning the Indian Uprising, based at the University of Edinburgh.

Marina Carter obtained her doctorate in history at the University of Oxford. She was a Research Fellow working on the Indian Uprising in the School of History, Classics and Archaeology at the University of Edinburgh and is currently an Honorary Fellow of Edinburgh University’s Centre for South Asian Studies.

She has published extensively in the field of Asian migration and in particular on the Mascarene Islands. Her publications include Abacus & Mah Jong: Chinese Settlement and Socio-Economic Consolidation in Mauritius (2009) with J. Ng Foong Kwong, Coolitude: An Anthology of the Indian Labour Diaspora (2002) with Khal Toorabully and Voices from Indenture: Experiences of Indian Migrants in the British Empire (1996).

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Additional Information

Publisher
SAGE Publications India
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Published on
Jan 2, 2017
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Pages
408
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ISBN
9789385985751
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Asia / India & South Asia
History / Historiography
Political Science / World / Asian
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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