Comparative, International, and Global Justice: Perspectives from Criminology and Criminal Justice

SAGE Publications
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Comparative, International and Global Justice: Perspectives from Criminology and Criminal Justice presents and critically assesses a wide range of topics relevant to criminology, criminal justice and global justice. The text is divided into three parts: comparative criminal justice, international criminology, and transnational and global criminology. Within each field are located specific topics which the authors regard as contemporary and highly relevant and that will assist students in gaining a fuller appreciation of global justice issues. Authors Cyndi Banks and James Baker address these complex global issues using a scholarly but accessible approach, often using detailed case studies. The discussion of each topic is a comprehensive contextualized account that explains the social context in which law and crime exist and engages with questions of explanation or interpretation.

The authors challenge students to gain knowledge of international and comparative criminal justice issues and think about them in a critical manner. It has become difficult to ignore the global and international dimensions of criminal justice and criminology and this text aims to enhance criminal justice education by focusing on some of the issues engaging criminology worldwide, and to prepare students for a future where fields of study like transnational crime are unexceptional.

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About the author

Cyndi Banks is Associate Vice President of Student Success at Capilano University in Canada. She spent 16 years as a professor of criminology and criminal justice and Dean of University College at Northern Arizona University. She has more than 24 years’ experience of research and project implementation in developing countries in the fields of juvenile justice, probation, justice policy, and child rights. She has worked as a criminologist in Papua New Guinea, Bangladesh, Iraq, Kurdistan, Timor Leste, Sudan, and Myanmar. She is the author of numerous articles and books, including Criminal Justice Ethics; Youth, Crime and Justice; Developing Cultural Criminology: Theory and Practice in Papua New Guinea; Alaska Native Juveniles in Detention; Comparative, International, and Global Justice: Perspectives From Criminology and Criminal Justice; and most recently, Prisons in the United States.


James Baker is a British lawyer now resident in the United States. He holds an LL.M. from London University with a specialization in law and development and has 30 years of experience working as a lawyer and researching rule of law and access to justice issues in Papua New Guinea, Bangladesh, Afghanistan, Iraq, Malawi, Sierra Leone, Fiji, and Timor Leste.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SAGE Publications
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Published on
Sep 23, 2015
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Pages
592
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ISBN
9781506337296
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Language
English
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Genres
Law / International
Social Science / Criminology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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