Holy Land: A Suburban Memoir

W. W. Norton & Company
3
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"Infinitely moving and powerful, just dead-on right, and absolutely original." —Joan Didion

Since its publication in 1996, Holy Land has become an American classic. In "quick, translucent prose" (Michiko Kakutani, New York Times) that is at once lyrical and unsentimental, D. J. Waldie recounts growing up in Lakewood, California, a prototypical post-World War II suburb. Laid out in 316 sections as carefully measured as a grid of tract houses, Holy Land is by turns touching, eerie, funny, and encyclopedic in its handling of what was gained and lost when thousands of blue-collar families were thrown together in the suburbs of the 1950s. An intensely realized and wholly original memoir about the way in which a place can shape a life, Holy Land is ultimately about the resonance of choices—how wide a street should be, what to name a park—and the hopes that are realized in the habits of everyday life.

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About the author

D. J. Waldie still lives in the tract house he writes about. He has received a Whiting Writers Award and a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, among other honors.

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Additional Information

Publisher
W. W. Norton & Company
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Published on
Apr 17, 2005
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Pages
192
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ISBN
9780393078565
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Personal Memoirs
History / United States / 20th Century
History / United States / State & Local / West (AK, CA, CO, HI, ID, MT, NV, UT, WY)
Social Science / Regional Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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