La Historia, lost in translation?: Actas del XIII Congreso de la Asociación de Historia Contemporánea

Ediciones de la Universidad de Castilla La Mancha
4

 El área de Historia Contemporánea de la Universidad de Castilla – La Mancha organizó entre el 21 y el 23 de septiembre de 2016 la XIII edición del congreso bienal de la Asociación de Historia Contemporánea (AHC). La Historia, lost in translation? consolidó y sometió a discusión y debate treinta y tres paneles, dirigidos por noventa y un coordinadores, que sumaron un total de cuatrocientos doce textos elaborados por cuatrocientos cincuenta y dos congresistas de diferentes nacionalidades. Estas actas recogen los resultados de treinta y uno de esos talleres, y doscientas ochenta y seis investigaciones. Después de trece ediciones, el proyecto bienal de congresos de la Asociación de Historia Contemporánea (AHC) puede considerarse un referente como pocos de la investigación, la producción de conocimiento científico y su divulgación. Un éxito que debe ser alabado en la dimensión colectiva de un acontecimiento académico al que han contribuido el buen hacer de los organizadores de las ediciones precedentes, el trabajo continuado de la Asociación –desde sus órganos de dirección al último de los socios–, y el esfuerzo siempre generoso de quienes a lo largo de todos estos años han participado con sus investigaciones y conocimientos. Los comunicantes son y han sido el verdadero sostén de nuestros congresos, lo que les convierte en acreedores de este minúsculo reconocimiento por contribuir a hacer un poco mejor cada vez nuestra disciplina.
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Publisher
Ediciones de la Universidad de Castilla La Mancha
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Pages
3815
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ISBN
9788490442654
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Modern / 20th Century
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