Africa Lost: Rhodesia's COIN Killing Machine

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The Lost Chapter of Special Operations History: Rhodesia.

Some of the most explosive combat in Special Operations history is almost completely unknown to the Western World. Everyone knows about Navy SEALs and Green Berets but nobody knows about the deep recce, sabotage, and direct action missions conducted by the Rhodesian SAS. The Rhodesian Light Infantry was a killing machine, participating in combat jumps every night during the heat of the Bush War. The Selous Scouts were perhaps the most innovative and daring unconventional warfare unit in history which would pair white soldiers with turncoat black "former" terrorists who would then infiltrate enemy camps.

US military veteran and historian Dan Tharp covers each of these three units in depth in Africa Lost.
(18,000 words)

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About the author

DAN THARP has spent over 30 years studying military history, beginning with a book given to him at nine years of age about the history of the United States Marine Corps. After serving in the United States Navy he obtained a degree from the University of Missouri-Kansas City in Ancient History, focusing on the Roman and Greek military. His study of the conflicts in Southern Africa began with reading an article about the ‘Crippled Eagles,' a group of Americans who continued to battle communism in the nation of Rhodesia after the Vietnam War. After numerous articles for SOFREP.com and two successful novels, Task Force Intrepid: The Gold of Katanga and TFI: Highway to Hell, Africa Lost is his first in a series on the Cold War waged in Rhodesia and South Africa.

SOFREP.com is the #1 site on the Internet for news and information as it relates to the Special Operations and Intelligence community. In a very short time, SOFREP has become a legitimate source of alternative non partisan news media. The editors of SOFREP are from the US military Special Operations and Intelligence communities, and most have over a decade of operational experience that sets them apart from typical journalists.

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Additional Information

Publisher
St. Martin's Press
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Published on
Aug 6, 2013
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Pages
60
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ISBN
9781466841185
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Africa / South / General
History / Military / Special Forces
History / Military / United States
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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During the West’s great transition into the post-Colonial age, the country of Rhodesia refused to succumb quietly, and throughout the 1970s fought back almost alone against Communist-supported elements that it did not believe would deliver proper governance.

During this long war many heroes emerged, but none more skillful and courageous than Captain Darrell Watt of the Rhodesian SAS, who placed himself at the tip of the spear in the deadly battle to resist the forces of Robert Mugabe and Joshua Nkomo.

It is difficult to find another soldier’s story to equal Watt’s in terms of time spent on the field of battle and challenges faced. Even by the lofty standards of the SAS and Special Forces, one has to look far to find anyone who can match his record of resilience and valor in the face of such daunting odds and with resources so paltry. In the fight he showed himself to be a military maestro. A bush-lore genius, blessed with uncanny instincts and an unbridled determination to close with the enemy, he had no peers as a combat-tracker (and there was plenty of competition). But the Rhodesian theater was a fluid and volatile one in which he performed in almost every imaginable fighting role; as an airborne shock-trooper leading camp attacks, long range reconnaissance operator, covert urban operator, sniper, saboteur, seek-and-strike expert, and in the final stages as a key figure in mobilizing an allied army in neighboring Mozambique.

After 12 years in the cauldron of war his cause slipped from beneath him, however, and Rhodesia gave way to Zimbabwe. When the guns went quiet Watt had won all his battles but lost the war. In this fascinating biography we learn that in his twilight years he is now concerned with saving wildlife on a continent where they are in continued danger, devoting himself to both the fauna and African people he has cared so deeply about.
The mission was to kill the most wanted man in the world--an operation of such magnitude that it couldn't be handled by just any military or intelligence force. The best America had to offer was needed. As such, the task was handed to roughly forty members of America's supersecret counterterrorist unit formerly known as 1st Special Forces Operational Detachment-Delta; more popularly, the elite and mysterious unit Delta Force.
The American generals were flexible. A swatch of hair, a drop of blood, or simply a severed finger wrapped in plastic would be sufficient. Delta's orders were to go into harm's way and prove to the world bin Laden had been terminated.
These Delta warriors had help: a dozen of the British Queen's elite commandos, another dozen or so Army Green Berets, and six intelligence operatives from the CIA who laid the groundwork by providing cash, guns, bullets, intelligence, and interrogation skills to this clandestine military force. Together, this team waged modern siege of epic proportions against bin Laden and his seemingly impenetrable cave sanctuary burrowed deep inside the Spin Ghar Mountain range in eastern Afghanistan.
Over the years, since the battle ended, scores of news stories have surfaced offering tidbits of information about what actually happened in Tora Bora. Most of it is conjecture and speculation.
This is the real story of the operation, the first eyewitness account of the Battle of Tora Bora, and the first book to detail just how close Delta Force came to capturing bin Laden, how close U.S. bombers and fighter aircraft came to killing him, and exactly why he slipped through our fingers. Lastly, this is an extremely rare inside look at the shadowy world of Delta Force and a detailed account of these warriors in battle.
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