Latin American Entrepreneurs: Many Firms but Little Innovation

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Entrepreneurship is a fundamental driver of growth, development, and job creation. While Latin America and the Caribbean has a wealth of entrepreneurs, firms in the region, compared to those in other regions, are small in size and less likely to grow or innovate. Productivity growth has remained lackluster for decades, including during the recent commodity boom. Enhancing the creation of good jobs and accelerating productivity growth in the region will require dynamic entrepreneurs. Latin American Entrepreneurs: Many Firms but Little Innovation studies the landscape of entrepreneurship in Latin America and the Caribbean. Utilizing new datasets that cover issues such as firm creation, firm dynamics, export decisions, and the behavior of multinational corporations, the book synthesizes the results of a comprehensive analysis of the status, prospects, and challenges of entrepreneurship in the region. Useful tools and information are provided to help policy makers and practitioners identify policy areas governments can explore to enhance innovation and encourage high-growth, transformational entrepreneurship.
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About the author

Daniel Lederman is Senior Economist in the Office of the Chief Economist for Latin America and the Caribbean at the World Bank.

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Additional Information

Publisher
World Bank Publications
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Published on
Dec 13, 2013
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Pages
168
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ISBN
9781464800139
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Entrepreneurship
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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Available on Android devices
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Daniel Lederman
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