The Universe in the Rearview Mirror: How Hidden Symmetries Shape Reality

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“A great read… Goldberg is an excellent guide.”—Mario Livio, bestselling author of The Golden Ratio
 
Physicist Dave Goldberg speeds across space, time and everything in between showing that our elegant universe—from the Higgs boson to antimatter to the most massive group of galaxies—is shaped by hidden symmetries that have driven all our recent discoveries about the universe and all the ones to come.
 
Why is the sky dark at night? If there is anti-matter, can there be anti-people? Why are past, present, and future our only options? Saluting the brilliant but unsung female mathematician Emmy Noether as well as other giants of physics, Goldberg answers these questions and more, exuberantly demonstrating that symmetry is the big idea—and the key to what lies ahead.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
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About the author

Dave Goldberg is an associate professor and director of undergraduate studies in the Department of Physics at Drexel University. He lives in Philadelphia.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
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Reviews

4.5
11 total
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Additional Information

Publisher
Penguin
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Published on
Jul 11, 2013
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Pages
352
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ISBN
9781101624296
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Cosmology
Science / Physics / Mathematical & Computational
Science / Physics / Quantum Theory
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Dave Goldberg
A concise and authoritative introduction to one of the central theories of modern physics

For a theory as genuinely elegant as the Standard Model—the current framework describing elementary particles and their forces—it can sometimes appear to students to be little more than a complicated collection of particles and ranked list of interactions. The Standard Model in a Nutshell provides a comprehensive and uncommonly accessible introduction to one of the most important subjects in modern physics, revealing why, despite initial appearances, the entire framework really is as elegant as physicists say.

Dave Goldberg uses a "just-in-time" approach to instruction that enables students to gradually develop a deep understanding of the Standard Model even if this is their first exposure to it. He covers everything from relativity, group theory, and relativistic quantum mechanics to the Higgs boson, unification schemes, and physics beyond the Standard Model. The book also looks at new avenues of research that could answer still-unresolved questions and features numerous worked examples, helpful illustrations, and more than 120 exercises.

Provides an essential introduction to the Standard Model for graduate students and advanced undergraduates across the physical sciencesRequires no more than an undergraduate-level exposure to quantum mechanics, classical mechanics, and electromagnetismUses a "just-in-time" approach to topics such as group theory, relativity, classical fields, Feynman diagrams, and quantum field theoryCouched in a conversational tone to make reading and learning easierIdeal for a one-semester course or independent studyIncludes a wealth of examples, illustrations, and exercisesSolutions manual (available only to professors)
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Alongside questions of energy and mass, they will consider the third, and perhaps, most intriguing element of the equation: 'c' - or the speed of light. Why is it that the speed of light is the exchange rate? Answering this question is at the heart of the investigation as the authors demonstrate how, in order to truly understand why E=mc2, we first must understand why we must move forward in time and not backwards and how objects in our 3-dimensional world actually move in 4-dimensional space-time. In other words, how the very fabric of our world is constructed. A collaboration between two of the youngest professors in the UK, Why Does E=mc2? promises to be one of the most exciting and accessible explanations of the theory of relativity in recent years.
 

Dave Goldberg
A concise and authoritative introduction to one of the central theories of modern physics

For a theory as genuinely elegant as the Standard Model—the current framework describing elementary particles and their forces—it can sometimes appear to students to be little more than a complicated collection of particles and ranked list of interactions. The Standard Model in a Nutshell provides a comprehensive and uncommonly accessible introduction to one of the most important subjects in modern physics, revealing why, despite initial appearances, the entire framework really is as elegant as physicists say.

Dave Goldberg uses a "just-in-time" approach to instruction that enables students to gradually develop a deep understanding of the Standard Model even if this is their first exposure to it. He covers everything from relativity, group theory, and relativistic quantum mechanics to the Higgs boson, unification schemes, and physics beyond the Standard Model. The book also looks at new avenues of research that could answer still-unresolved questions and features numerous worked examples, helpful illustrations, and more than 120 exercises.

Provides an essential introduction to the Standard Model for graduate students and advanced undergraduates across the physical sciencesRequires no more than an undergraduate-level exposure to quantum mechanics, classical mechanics, and electromagnetismUses a "just-in-time" approach to topics such as group theory, relativity, classical fields, Feynman diagrams, and quantum field theoryCouched in a conversational tone to make reading and learning easierIdeal for a one-semester course or independent studyIncludes a wealth of examples, illustrations, and exercisesSolutions manual (available only to professors)
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