A Life Twice Given

Berwick Court Publishing Co
2
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There may be no loss as devastating as losing one’s child. Who then could fault the Jacobsons, overwhelmed by anguish, for accepting the help of a scientific cabal promising to clone their son Joey? Though Joey’s promising second life will lead to love and a good job with the CIA, he remains unaware of the circumstances, and the deleterious consequences, of his existence. When tragedy strikes, Joey must come to terms with the mystery of his past and the uncertainty of his future.

A Life Twice Given, the captivating debut novel from David Daniel, is a masterwork of speculative fiction inspired by the author’s personal loss. Daniel delivers an immaculately crafted, genuinely human portrait of a future both idyllic and dystopic.

 

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About the author

 I was born in 1956 to Carlton Ralph Daniel and Beverly Beatrice Gordon. Dad’s family were the only Jews in a small town in southeast Georgia. They owned two clothing shops before the Great Depression, then lost everything and rebuilt. Dad was the only of six siblings to attend college and became an internist. Mom’s family were descendants of a rabbi and other eastern European Jews who settled in Meridian and Jackson, Mississippi and became prosperous merchants. Mom was politically outspoken and served as President of the Mississippi chapter of Hadassah.

 

During my grammar school and high school years, the civil rights movement and Cold War were prominent. Our rabbi and others in the Jewish community actively supported desegregation, leading to bombing of the synagogue and rabbi’s house by the Ku Klux Klan in 1967. During that period, it was not uncommon for Jewish families to sleep with firearms nearby for their protection. 

 

My favorite columnists as a child were William F. Buckley and Art Buchwald. I was torn between a career in journalism and medicine. I elected the latter due to my interest in psychiatry. I obtained my medical school education and post-graduate training in psychiatry at Vanderbilt Medical School and began a research career in medical school with the study of cerebral blood flow patterns underlying behavior. I've  published extensively on the biological basis and treatment of psychotic disorders and have patented my own treatments.

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Reviews

4.5
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Additional Information

Publisher
Berwick Court Publishing Co
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Published on
Aug 9, 2016
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Pages
284
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ISBN
9781944376017
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Jewish
Fiction / Science Fiction / Apocalyptic & Post-Apocalyptic
Fiction / Science Fiction / Genetic Engineering
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Book 4
Private investigator Alex Rasmussen has loved carnivals since he was a boy, and what better way to enjoy one as a grown man than with a lovely woman at his side? As he and his date stroll along the midway, playing games of chance, the soft September night is torn by a scream. Rasmussen rushes to a nearby field to find a woman's body in the weeds.

One of the carnival workers---a man with trouble in his past and a motive for murder---is arrested and charged with the crime. The lawyer hired to defend him retains Rasmussen to investigate. The police are convinced they have a clear-cut case, but as Alex probes, he finds a trail as bewildering as a funhouse mirror maze.

An outsider to the close-knit "carnies," and shunned by the police department he once served, Rasmussen faces a client who refuses to talk, gangsters looking to exploit the carnival's troubles, a mob of citizens bent on rough justice, and an elusive killer who seems to anticipate Alex's every move.

When the investigation points to crooked cops, the defending lawyer abandons the case. Wisdom says Rasmussen should do likewise, but staying on has become a matter of honor. As a woman tells him, "We all end up in the graveyard, flying the marble kite." The only question now is: When?

In the old city of Lowell (once the textile capital of America, now a husk of run-down mills), the streets have never been meaner. Beyond the flickering lights and the bright surfaces lies a shadow world where betrayal, deception, and violent death await.

David Daniel
The Sixties -- San Francisco, Haight-Ashbury, the Summer of Love. It's a wistful memory for some, and it brings envious sighs for those too late to experience it. David Daniel vividly recreates that world and its legends in White Rabbit - and then injects a harsh dissonance into the flower children's songs of peace, love, sex, and marijuana. It is easy to see that the collection of young people who gathered in San Francisco in those few summers could be tempting prey for a murderous sociopath. They discarded their real names, had no set address, hid from their families, were often stoned. And they took one another at face value, asking no questions.

The search for the killer leads to an unusual collaboration. Can a no-frills police officer, grieving for his dead wife, stepped down from homicide detective to vice cop, have anything in common with a young hippie woman who writes for an alternative newspaper and whose lover is determined to turn a demonstration for peace in Vietnam into a violent revolution? Both seek the killer, working from opposite ends of 60's society, and mistrusting each other. Sparrow has his enemies in the SFPD; Amy has doubts about her lover's plans for violent action. Both are aware that cooperation between them and the sharing of their special knowledge is their only option. By the breathtaking climax, where Amy herself becomes the target, it is clear to Sparrow that he must confront the killer and his own demons as well in order to save her, his city -- and himself. Daniel has wonderfully captured the joys and frenzies of the Haight-Ashbury streets in those spirited days. For all of us who missed the Summer of Love, for whatever reason, White Rabbit is a fascinating trip, serial killer and all.

David Daniel
The Sixties -- San Francisco, Haight-Ashbury, the Summer of Love. It's a wistful memory for some, and it brings envious sighs for those too late to experience it. David Daniel vividly recreates that world and its legends in White Rabbit - and then injects a harsh dissonance into the flower children's songs of peace, love, sex, and marijuana. It is easy to see that the collection of young people who gathered in San Francisco in those few summers could be tempting prey for a murderous sociopath. They discarded their real names, had no set address, hid from their families, were often stoned. And they took one another at face value, asking no questions.

The search for the killer leads to an unusual collaboration. Can a no-frills police officer, grieving for his dead wife, stepped down from homicide detective to vice cop, have anything in common with a young hippie woman who writes for an alternative newspaper and whose lover is determined to turn a demonstration for peace in Vietnam into a violent revolution? Both seek the killer, working from opposite ends of 60's society, and mistrusting each other. Sparrow has his enemies in the SFPD; Amy has doubts about her lover's plans for violent action. Both are aware that cooperation between them and the sharing of their special knowledge is their only option. By the breathtaking climax, where Amy herself becomes the target, it is clear to Sparrow that he must confront the killer and his own demons as well in order to save her, his city -- and himself. Daniel has wonderfully captured the joys and frenzies of the Haight-Ashbury streets in those spirited days. For all of us who missed the Summer of Love, for whatever reason, White Rabbit is a fascinating trip, serial killer and all.

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