Scottish Highlanders on the Eve of the Great Migration, 1725-1775: The People of Highland Perthshire, Volume 1

Genealogical Publishing Com
Free sample

This is part of a series by David Dobson designed to identify the origins of Scottish Highlanders who traveled to America prior to the Great Highland Migration that began in the 1730s and intensified thereafter. The events leading to the Highland exodus are worthy of mention again. Much of this emigration was directly related to a breakdown in social and economic institutions. Under the pressures of the commercial and industrial revolutions of the 17th and 18th centuries, Highland chieftains abandoned their patriarchal role in favor of becoming capitalist landlords. By raising farm rents to the breaking point, the chiefs left the social fabric of the Scottish Highlands in tatters. Accordingly, voluntary emigration by Gaelic-speaking Highlanders began in the 1730s. The social breakdown was intensified by the failure of the Jacobite cause in 1745, followed by the British military occupation and repression that occurred in the Highlands in the aftermath of the Battle of Culloden. In 1746, the British government dispatched about 1,000 Highland Jacobite prisoners of war to the colonies as indentured servants. Later, during the Seven Years War of 1756ΓÇô63, many members of Highland regiments recruited in the service of the British Crown chose to settle in Canada and America rather than return to Scotland.

Once in North America, the Highlanders tended to be clannish and moved in extended family groups, unlike immigrants from the Lowlands who moved as individuals or in groups of a few families. The Gaelic-speaking Highlanders tended to settle on the North American frontier, whereas the Lowlanders merged with the English on the coast. Highlanders seem to have established “beachheads,‿ and their kin subsequently followed. The best example of this pattern is in North Carolina, where they first arrived in 1739 and moved to the Piedmont, to be followed by others for over a century.

Highlanders from particular counties in Scotland, moreover, settled in particular areas in the colonies; for example, the earliest emigrants from Highland Perthshire were Jacobite prisoners transported to South Carolina, Maryland, and the West Indies in 1716 and 1746. The next group from Highland Perthshire were soldiers recruited for regiments, particularly the Black Watch, that fought in the French and Indian War, some of whom settled in the colonies in the aftermath. Possibly influenced by their settlement, there followed families bound from Greenock to New York aboard ships such as the Monimia and the Commerce in 1775 to settle on the frontier. Most of them tended to be Loyalists at the outbreak of the American Revolution and consequently moved to Canada.

Another factor that distinguishes research in Highland genealogy is the availability of pertinent records. Scottish genealogical research is generally based on the parish registers of the Church of Scotland, which provide information on baptism and marriage. In the Scottish Lowlands, such records can date back to the mid-16th century, but in general Highland records start much later. Americans seeking their Highland roots, therefore, face the problem that there are few, if any, church records available that predate the American Revolution. In the absence of Church of Scotland records, the researcher must turn to a miscellany of other records, such as court records, estate papers, sasines, gravestone inscriptions, burgess rolls, port books, services of heirs, wills and testaments, and especially rent rolls. (Some rent rolls even predate parish registers.)

Mr. DobsonΓÇÖs series, therefore, is designed to identify the kinds of material that is available in the absence of parish registers and to supplement the church registers when they are available. Scottish Highlanders on the Eve the Great Migration, 1725ΓÇô1775: The People of Highland Perthshire, is the second volume in the series, and as such it deals with the location from whence some of the
Read more
Collapse
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Genealogical Publishing Com
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Dec 31, 2006
Read more
Collapse
Pages
109
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9780806353043
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
Reference / Genealogy & Heraldry
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more
Collapse

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
David Dobson sets out to overcome some of the obstacles facing North Americans attempting to trace ancestors in Ireland prior to 1820. Researchers with colonial Irish ancestors must contend with the fact that no official records of arriving immigrants exist for the United States prior to 1820, nor prior to 1865 in Canada. On the other hand, if the researcher can establish that an immigrant ancestor lived in or near a certain port of entry at a particular time, he may be able to "jump" the Atlantic by utilizing the records of the very vessels known to or likely to have transported passengers from Ireland to North America between 1623 and 1850. Modeled after a similar volume compiled by the author for Scottish vessels of this era, Ships from Ireland to Early America is an alphabetically arranged list of 1,500 vessels known to have embarked from Ireland to North America. For each vessel we learn the dates and ports of embarkation and arrival and the source of the information, and frequently the number of passengers and the name of the ship's captain. In the compilation of the volume, Mr. Dobson combed through contemporary newspapers, government records in Great Britain and North America, and a small number of published works. The author's sources are itemized and coded at the front of the volume, where the reader will also find an informative essay on the conditions of colonial transportation to North America. While Mr. Dobson makes no claims as to the comprehensiveness of this list of Irish vessels, he has nonetheless assembled another groundbreaking work on a subject of great importance to American genealogists.
This is a definitive account of the land and the people of Old Monocacy in early Frederick County, Maryland. The outgrowth of a project begun by Grace L. Tracey and completed by John P. Dern, it presents a detailed account of landholdings in that part of western Maryland that eventually became Frederick County. At the same time it provides a history of the inhabitants of the area, from the early traders and explorers to the farsighted investors and speculators, from the original Quaker settlers to the Germans of central Frederick County.
In essence, the book has a dual focus. First it attempts to locate and describe the land of the early settlers. This is done by means of a superb series of plat maps, drawn to scale from original surveys and based both on certificates of survey and patents. These show, in precise configurations, the exact locations of the various grants and lots, the names of owners and occupiers, the dates of surveys and patents, and the names of contiguous land owners. Second, it identifies the early settlers and inhabitants of the area, carefully following them through deeds, wills, and inventories, judgment records, and rent rolls.
Finally, in meticulously compiled appendices it provides a chronological list of surveys between 1721 and 1743; an alphabetical list of surveys, giving dates, page reference--text and maps--and patent references; a list of taxables for 1733-34; and a list of the early German settlers of Frederick County, showing their religion, their location, dates of arrival, and their earliest records in the county.
Winner of the 1988 Donald Lines Jacobus Award!
©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.