The American Journey

American Journey, The

180 days

For U.S. History survey courses

Frame American history through personal and collective journeys
The American Journey: A History of the United States traces the journeys — geographical, ideological, political, and social — that make up the American experience. Harnessing the stories of individuals from different eras, the authors present a strong, clear narrative that makes American history accessible to students. Offering a blend of political and social histories, the Eighth Edition continues to show that our attempt to live up to our American ideals is an ongoing journey — one that has become increasingly more inclusive of different groups and ideas.

Also available with MyHistoryLab®
MyHistoryLab for the U.S. History survey course extends learning online to engage students and improve results. Media resources with assignments bring concepts to life, and offer students opportunities to practice applying what they’ve learned. Please note: this version of MyHistoryLab does not include an eText.

The American Journey: A History of the United States, Eighth Edition is also available via REVEL™, an interactive learning environment that enables students to read, practice, and study in one continuous experience.

Note: You are purchasing a standalone product; MyLab™ & Mastering™ does not come packaged with this content. Students, if interested in purchasing this title with MyLab & Mastering, ask your instructor for the correct package ISBN and Course ID. Instructors, contact your Pearson representative for more information.

If you would like to purchase both the physical text and MyLab & Mastering, search for:
013435866X / 9780134358666 The American Journey: A History of the United States, Volume 1 plus MyHistoryLab for U.S. History Survey – Access Card Package, 8/e
Package consists of:
  • 0134102940 / 9780134102948 The American Journey: A History of the United States, Volume 1, 8/e
  • 0205967779 / 9780205967773 MyHistoryLab for U.S. History Survey Access Card
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About the author

David Goldfield is the Robert Lee Bailey Professor of History at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte. A native of Memphis, he grew up in Brooklyn, New York, and attended the University of Maryland. He is the author or editor of sixteen books dealing with the history of the American South, including two works, Cotton Fields and Skyscrapers: Southern City and Region (1982) and Black, White, and Southern: Race Relations and Southern Culture (1991), nominated for the Pulitzer Prize in history, and both received the Mayflower Award for Non-Fiction. Still Fighting the Civil War: The American South and Southern History, which appeared in 2002, received the Jules and Frances Landry Prize and was named by Choice as an Outstanding Non-fiction Book. His most recent book is America Aflame: How the Civil War Created a Nation (2011). Goldfield was the President of the Southern Historical Association (2012—2013) and is also the editor of the Journal of Urban History. He serves as an expert witness in voting rights and death penalty cases, as a consultant on the urban South to museums and public television and radio, and as an Academic Specialist for the U.S. State Department, leading workshops on American history and culture in foreign countries. He also serves on the Advisory Board of the Lincoln Prize.

Carl Abbott is Professor Emeritus of Urban Studies and Planning at Portland State University. He taught previously in the history departments at the University of Denver and Old Dominion University, and held visiting appointments at Mesa College in Colorado, George Washington University, and the University of Oregon. He holds degrees in history from Swarthmore College and the University of Chicago. He specializes in the history of cities and the American West and served as co-editor of the Pacific Historical Review from 1997 to 2014. His books include The New Urban America: Growth and Politics in Sunbelt Cities (1981, 1987), The Metropolitan Frontier: Cities in the Modern American West (1993), Political Terrain: Washington, D.C. from Tidewater Town to Global Metropolis (1999), Frontiers Past and Future: Science Fiction and the American West (2006), How Cities Won the West: Four Centuries of Urban Change in Western North America (2008), and Imagined Frontiers: Contemporary America and Beyond (2015). He has served as president of the Urban History Association and the Pacific Coast Branch-American Historical Association.

Virginia DeJohn Anderson is Professor of History at the University of Colorado at Boulder. She received her B.A. from the University of Connecticut and as a Marshall Scholar earned an M.A. degree at the University of East Anglia in Norwich, England. Returning to the United States, she received her A.M. and Ph.D. degrees from Harvard University. A recipient of fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies and the National Endowment for the Humanities, she is the author of New England’s Generation (1991) and Creatures of Empire: People and Animals in Early America (2004). She has also published several articles on colonial history, which have appeared in such journals as the William and Mary Quarterly and the New England Quarterly. Her current book project is tentatively entitled The Martyr and the Traitor: The Perilous Lives of Moses Dunbar and Nathan Hale in the American Revolution.

Jo Ann E. Argersinger is Professor of History at Southern Illinois University, where she won the George S. and Gladys W. Queen Award for Outstanding Teacher in History. She received her Ph.D. from George Washington University. A recipient of fellowships from the Rockefeller Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities, she is a historian of U.S. women, labor, and transnational history. Her publications include Toward a New Deal in Baltimore: People and Government in the Great Depression (1988), Making the Amalgamated: Gender, Ethnicity, and Class in the Baltimore Clothing Industry (1999), and The Triangle Fire: A Brief History with Documents (2009). She is currently writing a book entitled Contested Visions of American Democracy: Public Housing and Citizenship in the International Arena.

Peter H. Argersinger is Professor of History at Southern Illinois University, where he was named Outstanding Scholar by the College of Liberal Arts. He received his B.A. from the University of Kansas and his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin. He has been a Fellow of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C., and he has received fellowships, grants, and awards from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Historical Association, the Organization of American Historians, the Massachusetts Historical Society, and other organizations. Among his books on American political and rural history are Populism and Politics (1974), Structure, Process, and Party (1992), and The Limits of Agrarian Radicalism (1995). His most recent book, integrating legal and political history, is Representation and Inequality in Late Nineteenth-Century America: The Politics of Apportionment (2012). His current research focuses on the political crisis of the 1890s.

William L. Barney is Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. A native of Pennsylvania, he received his B.A. from Cornell University and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Columbia University. He has published extensively on nineteenth-century U.S. history and has a particular interest in the Old South and the coming of the Civil War. Among his publications are The Road to Secession (1972), The Secessionist Impulse (1974), Flawed Victory (1975), The Passage of the Republic (1987), Battleground for the Union (1989), and The Making of a Confederate: Walter Lenoir’s Civil War (1997). He is currently finishing an edited collection of essays on nineteenth-century America and a book on the Civil War. Most recently, he has edited A Companion to 19th-Century America (2001) and finished The Civil War and Reconstruction: A Student Companion (2001).

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Additional Information

Publisher
Pearson
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Published on
Apr 11, 2016
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Pages
496
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ISBN
9780134103266
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / Teaching Methods & Materials / Social Science
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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"This is a probing book about the hold of the past, experienced largely as heritage and memory and not as historical understanding, on a whole region and people. Goldfield treats the Lost Cause with unblinking directness.... its main strength: the stress on the weight of memory and its enduring links to white supremacy." -- David W. Blight, Southern Cultures
"Drawing on a wide range of sources as well as contemporary reporting, this deftly written historical analysis takes on a difficult topic with passion, sensitivity, and integrity." -- Publishers Weekly
In the updated edition of his sweeping narrative on southern history, David Goldfield brings this extensive study into the present with a timely assessment of the unresolved issues surrounding the Civil War's sesquicentennial commemoration. Traversing a hundred and fifty years of memory, Goldfield confronts the remnants of the American Civil War that survive in the hearts of many of the South's residents and in the national news headlines of battle flags, racial injustice, and religious conflicts.
Goldfield candidly discusses how and why white southern men fashioned the myths of the Lost Cause and Redemption out of the Civil War and Reconstruction, and how they shaped a religion to canonize the heroes and deify the events of those fateful years. He also recounts how groups of blacks and white women eventually crafted a different, more inclusive version of southern history and how that new vision competed with more traditional perspectives.
The battle for southern history, and for the South, continues -- in museums, public spaces, books, state legislatures, and the minds of southerners. Given the region's growing economic power and political influence, understanding this struggle takes on national significance. Through an analysis of ideas of history and memory, religion, race, and gender, Still Fighting the Civil War provides us with a better understanding of the South and one another.
Available for the first time in the United States, this international bestseller reveals the secrets of nonverbal communication to give you confidence and control in any face-to-face encounter–from making a great first impression and acing a job interview to finding the right partner.

It is a scientific fact that people’s gestures give away their true intentions. Yet most of us don’t know how to read body language–and don’t realize how our own physical movements speak to others. Now the world’s foremost experts on the subject share their techniques for reading body language signals to achieve success in every area of life.

Drawing upon more than thirty years in the field, as well as cutting-edge research from evolutionary biology, psychology, and medical technologies that demonstrate what happens in the brain, the authors examine each component of body language and give you the basic vocabulary to read attitudes and emotions through behavior.

Discover:
• How palms and handshakes are used to gain control
• The most common gestures of liars
• How the legs reveal what the mind wants to do
• The most common male and female courtship gestures and signals
• The secret signals of cigarettes, glasses, and makeup
• The magic of smiles–including smiling advice for women
• How to use nonverbal cues and signals to communicate more effectively and get the reactions you want

Filled with fascinating insights, humorous observations, and simple strategies that you can apply to any situation, this intriguing book will enrich your communication with and understanding of others–as well as yourself.


From the Hardcover edition.
When we think of the key figures of early American history, we think of explorers, or pilgrims, or Native Americans--not cattle, or goats, or swine. But as Virginia DeJohn Anderson reveals in this brilliantly original account of colonists in New England and the Chesapeake region, livestock played a vitally important role in the settling of the New World. Livestock, Anderson writes, were a central factor in the cultural clash between colonists and Indians as well as a driving force in the expansion west. By bringing livestock across the Atlantic, colonists believed that they provided the means to realize America's potential. It was thought that if the Native Americans learned to keep livestock as well, they would be that much closer to assimilating the colonists' culture, especially their Christian faith. But colonists failed to anticipate the problems that would arise as Indians began encountering free-ranging livestock at almost every turn, often trespassing in their cornfields. Moreover, when growing populations and an expansive style of husbandry required far more space than they had expected, colonists could see no alternative but to appropriate Indian land. This created tensions that reached the boiling point with King Philip's War and Bacon's Rebellion. And it established a pattern that would repeat time and again over the next two centuries. A stunning account that presents our history in a truly new light, Creatures of Empire restores a vital element of our past, illuminating one of the great forces of colonization and the expansion westward.
For U.S. History survey courses

Frame American history through personal and collective journeys
The American Journey: A History of the United States traces the journeys – geographical, ideological, political, and social – that make up the American experience. Harnessing the stories of individuals from different eras, the authors present a strong, clear narrative that makes American history accessible to students. Offering a blend of political and social histories, the Eighth Edition continues to show that our attempt to live up to our American ideals is an ongoing journey – one that has become increasingly more inclusive of different groups and ideas.

Also available with MyHistoryLab®
MyHistoryLab for the U.S. History survey course extends learning online to engage students and improve results. Media resources with assignments bring concepts to life, and offer students opportunities to practice applying what they’ve learned. Please note: this version of MyHistoryLab does not include an eText.

The American Journey: A History of the United States, Eighth Edition is also available via REVEL™, an interactive learning environment that enables students to read, practice, and study in one continuous experience.

Note: You are purchasing a standalone product; MyLab™ & Mastering™ does not come packaged with this content. Students, if interested in purchasing this title with MyLab & Mastering, ask your instructor for the correct package ISBN and Course ID. Instructors, contact your Pearson representative for more information.

If you would like to purchase both the physical text and MyLab & Mastering, search for:
0134376862 / 9780134376868 The American Journey: A History of the United States, Combined Volume plus MyHistoryLab for U.S. History Survey — Access Card Package, 8/e
Package consists of:
0205999727 / 9780205999729 The American Journey: A History of the United States, Combined Volume, 8/e 0205967779 / 9780205967773 MyHistoryLab for U.S. History Survey Access Card
NOTE: Before purchasing, check with your instructor to ensure you select the correct ISBN. Several versions of Pearson's MyLab & Mastering products exist for each title, and registrations are not transferable. To register for and use Pearson's MyLab & Mastering products, you may also need a Course ID, which your instructor will provide.

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For U.S. History survey courses
This package includes MyHistoryLab®

Frame American history through personal and collective journeys
The American Journey: A History of the United States traces the journeys — geographical, ideological, political, and social — that make up the American experience. Harnessing the stories of individuals from different eras, the authors present a strong, clear narrative that makes American history accessible to students. Offering a blend of political and social histories, the Eighth Edition continues to show that our attempt to live up to our American ideals is an ongoing journey — one that has become increasingly more inclusive of different groups and ideas.

Enhance learning with MyHistoryLab
MyHistoryLab for the U.S. History survey course extends learning online to engage students and improve results. Media resources with assignments bring concepts to life, and offer students opportunities to practice applying what they’ve learned. Please note: this version of MyHistoryLab does not include an eText.

The American Journey: A History of the United States, Eighth Edition is also available via REVEL™, an interactive learning environment that enables students to read, practice, and study in one continuous experience.

013435902X / 9780134359021 The American Journey: A History of the United States, Volume 2 plus MyHistoryLab for U.S. History Survey — Access Card Package, 8/e
Package consists of:
0134103319 / 9780134103310 The American Journey: A History of the United States, Volume 2, 8/e 0205967779 / 9780205967773 MyHistoryLab for U.S. History Survey Access Card
A sweeping and path-breaking history of the post–World War II decades, during which an activist federal government guided the country toward the first real flowering of the American Dream.

In The Gifted Generation, historian David Goldfield examines the generation immediately after World War II and argues that the federal government was instrumental in the great economic, social, and environmental progress of the era. Following the sacrifices of the Greatest Generation, the returning vets and their children took the unprecedented economic growth and federal activism to new heights. This generation was led by presidents who believed in the commonwealth ideal: the belief that federal legislation, by encouraging individual opportunity, would result in the betterment of the entire nation. In the years after the war, these presidents created an outpouring of federal legislation that changed how and where people lived, their access to higher education, and their stewardship of the environment. They also spearheaded historic efforts to level the playing field for minorities, women and immigrants. But this dynamic did not last, and Goldfield shows how the shrinking of the federal government shut subsequent generations off from those gifts.

David Goldfield brings this unprecedented surge in American legislative and cultural history to life as he explores the presidencies of Harry S. Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, and Lyndon Baines Johnson. He brilliantly shows how the nation's leaders persevered to create the conditions for the most gifted generation in U.S. history.
Jo Ann Argersinger's innovative analysis of the New Deal years in Baltimore establishes the significance of citizen participation and community organization in shaping the welfare programs of the Great Depression. Baltimore, a border city divided by race and openly hostile to unions, the unemployed, and working women, is a particularly valuable locus for gauging the impact of the New Deal.

This book examines the interaction of federal, state, and local policies, and documents the partial efforts of the New Deal to reach out to new constituencies. By unraveling the complex connections between government intervention and citizen action, Argersinger offers new insights into the real meaning of the Roosevelt record. She demonstrates how New Deal programs both encouraged and restricted the organized efforts of groups traditionally ignored by major party politics. With federal assistance, Baltimore's blacks, women, unionizing workers, and homeless unemployed attempted to combat local conservatism and make the New Deal more responsive to their needs. Ultimately, citizen activism was as important as federal legislation in determining the contours of the New Deal in Baltimore.

Originally published in 1988.

A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.

Construction innovation is an important but contested concept, both in industry practice and academic reflection and research. A fundamental reason for this is the nature of the construction industry itself: the industry and the value creation activities taking place there are multi-disciplinary, heterogeneous, distributed and often fragmented.

This book takes a new approach to construction innovation, revealing different perspectives, set in a broader context. It coalesces multiple theoretical and practice-based views in order to stimulate reflection and to prepare the ground for further synthesis. By being clear, cogent and unambiguous on the most basic definitions, it can mobilise a plurality of perspectives on innovation to promote fresh thinking on how it can be studied, enabled, measured, and propagated across the industry.

This book does not gloss over the real-life complexity of construction innovation. Instead, its authors look explicitly at the challenges that conceptual issues entail and by making their own position clear, they open up fresh intellectual space for reflection.

Construction Innovation examines innovation from different positions and through different conceptual lenses to reveal the richness that the theoretical perspectives offer to our understanding of the way that the construction sector actors innovate at both project and organizational levels.

The editors have brought together here leading scholars to deconstruct the concept of innovation and to discuss the merits of different perspectives, their commonalities and their diversity. The result is an invaluable sourcebook for those studying and leading innovation in the design, the building and the maintenance of our built environment.

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