American Journey, The, Volume 1: A History of the United States, Volume 1, Edition 8

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For U.S. History survey courses

Frame American history through personal and collective journeys
The American Journey: A History of the United States traces the journeys — geographical, ideological, political, and social — that make up the American experience. Harnessing the stories of individuals from different eras, the authors present a strong, clear narrative that makes American history accessible to students. Offering a blend of political and social histories, the Eighth Edition continues to show that our attempt to live up to our American ideals is an ongoing journey — one that has become increasingly more inclusive of different groups and ideas.

Also available with MyHistoryLab®
MyHistoryLab for the U.S. History survey course extends learning online to engage students and improve results. Media resources with assignments bring concepts to life, and offer students opportunities to practice applying what they’ve learned. Please note: this version of MyHistoryLab does not include an eText.

The American Journey: A History of the United States, Eighth Edition is also available via REVEL™, an interactive learning environment that enables students to read, practice, and study in one continuous experience.

Note: You are purchasing a standalone product; MyLab™ & Mastering™ does not come packaged with this content. Students, if interested in purchasing this title with MyLab & Mastering, ask your instructor for the correct package ISBN and Course ID. Instructors, contact your Pearson representative for more information.

If you would like to purchase both the physical text and MyLab & Mastering, search for:
013435866X / 9780134358666 The American Journey: A History of the United States, Volume 1 plus MyHistoryLab for U.S. History Survey – Access Card Package, 8/e
Package consists of:
  • 0134102940 / 9780134102948 The American Journey: A History of the United States, Volume 1, 8/e
  • 0205967779 / 9780205967773 MyHistoryLab for U.S. History Survey Access Card
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About the author

David Goldfield is the Robert Lee Bailey Professor of History at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte. A native of Memphis, he grew up in Brooklyn, New York, and attended the University of Maryland. He is the author or editor of sixteen books dealing with the history of the American South, including two works, Cotton Fields and Skyscrapers: Southern City and Region (1982) and Black, White, and Southern: Race Relations and Southern Culture (1991), nominated for the Pulitzer Prize in history, and both received the Mayflower Award for Non-Fiction. Still Fighting the Civil War: The American South and Southern History, which appeared in 2002, received the Jules and Frances Landry Prize and was named by Choice as an Outstanding Non-fiction Book. His most recent book is America Aflame: How the Civil War Created a Nation (2011). Goldfield was the President of the Southern Historical Association (2012—2013) and is also the editor of the Journal of Urban History. He serves as an expert witness in voting rights and death penalty cases, as a consultant on the urban South to museums and public television and radio, and as an Academic Specialist for the U.S. State Department, leading workshops on American history and culture in foreign countries. He also serves on the Advisory Board of the Lincoln Prize.

Carl Abbott is Professor Emeritus of Urban Studies and Planning at Portland State University. He taught previously in the history departments at the University of Denver and Old Dominion University, and held visiting appointments at Mesa College in Colorado, George Washington University, and the University of Oregon. He holds degrees in history from Swarthmore College and the University of Chicago. He specializes in the history of cities and the American West and served as co-editor of the Pacific Historical Review from 1997 to 2014. His books include The New Urban America: Growth and Politics in Sunbelt Cities (1981, 1987), The Metropolitan Frontier: Cities in the Modern American West (1993), Political Terrain: Washington, D.C. from Tidewater Town to Global Metropolis (1999), Frontiers Past and Future: Science Fiction and the American West (2006), How Cities Won the West: Four Centuries of Urban Change in Western North America (2008), and Imagined Frontiers: Contemporary America and Beyond (2015). He has served as president of the Urban History Association and the Pacific Coast Branch-American Historical Association.

Virginia DeJohn Anderson is Professor of History at the University of Colorado at Boulder. She received her B.A. from the University of Connecticut and as a Marshall Scholar earned an M.A. degree at the University of East Anglia in Norwich, England. Returning to the United States, she received her A.M. and Ph.D. degrees from Harvard University. A recipient of fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies and the National Endowment for the Humanities, she is the author of New England’s Generation (1991) and Creatures of Empire: People and Animals in Early America (2004). She has also published several articles on colonial history, which have appeared in such journals as the William and Mary Quarterly and the New England Quarterly. Her current book project is tentatively entitled The Martyr and the Traitor: The Perilous Lives of Moses Dunbar and Nathan Hale in the American Revolution.

Jo Ann E. Argersinger is Professor of History at Southern Illinois University, where she won the George S. and Gladys W. Queen Award for Outstanding Teacher in History. She received her Ph.D. from George Washington University. A recipient of fellowships from the Rockefeller Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities, she is a historian of U.S. women, labor, and transnational history. Her publications include Toward a New Deal in Baltimore: People and Government in the Great Depression (1988), Making the Amalgamated: Gender, Ethnicity, and Class in the Baltimore Clothing Industry (1999), and The Triangle Fire: A Brief History with Documents (2009). She is currently writing a book entitled Contested Visions of American Democracy: Public Housing and Citizenship in the International Arena.

Peter H. Argersinger is Professor of History at Southern Illinois University, where he was named Outstanding Scholar by the College of Liberal Arts. He received his B.A. from the University of Kansas and his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin. He has been a Fellow of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C., and he has received fellowships, grants, and awards from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Historical Association, the Organization of American Historians, the Massachusetts Historical Society, and other organizations. Among his books on American political and rural history are Populism and Politics (1974), Structure, Process, and Party (1992), and The Limits of Agrarian Radicalism (1995). His most recent book, integrating legal and political history, is Representation and Inequality in Late Nineteenth-Century America: The Politics of Apportionment (2012). His current research focuses on the political crisis of the 1890s.

William L. Barney is Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. A native of Pennsylvania, he received his B.A. from Cornell University and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Columbia University. He has published extensively on nineteenth-century U.S. history and has a particular interest in the Old South and the coming of the Civil War. Among his publications are The Road to Secession (1972), The Secessionist Impulse (1974), Flawed Victory (1975), The Passage of the Republic (1987), Battleground for the Union (1989), and The Making of a Confederate: Walter Lenoir’s Civil War (1997). He is currently finishing an edited collection of essays on nineteenth-century America and a book on the Civil War. Most recently, he has edited A Companion to 19th-Century America (2001) and finished The Civil War and Reconstruction: A Student Companion (2001).

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Additional Information

Publisher
Pearson
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Published on
Apr 11, 2016
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Pages
496
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ISBN
9780134103266
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / Teaching Methods & Materials / Social Science
History / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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David Goldfield
NOTE: Before purchasing, check with your instructor to ensure you select the correct ISBN. Several versions of Pearson's MyLab & Mastering products exist for each title, and registrations are not transferable. To register for and use Pearson's MyLab & Mastering products, you may also need a Course ID, which your instructor will provide.

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For U.S. History survey courses
This package includes MyHistoryLab®

Frame American history through personal and collective journeys
The American Journey: A History of the United States traces the journeys — geographical, ideological, political, and social — that make up the American experience. Harnessing the stories of individuals from different eras, the authors present a strong, clear narrative that makes American history accessible to students. Offering a blend of political and social histories, the Eighth Edition continues to show that our attempt to live up to our American ideals is an ongoing journey — one that has become increasingly more inclusive of different groups and ideas.

Enhance learning with MyHistoryLab
MyHistoryLab for the U.S. History survey course extends learning online to engage students and improve results. Media resources with assignments bring concepts to life, and offer students opportunities to practice applying what they’ve learned. Please note: this version of MyHistoryLab does not include an eText.

The American Journey: A History of the United States, Eighth Edition is also available via REVEL™, an interactive learning environment that enables students to read, practice, and study in one continuous experience.

013435902X / 9780134359021 The American Journey: A History of the United States, Volume 2 plus MyHistoryLab for U.S. History Survey — Access Card Package, 8/e
Package consists of:
0134103319 / 9780134103310 The American Journey: A History of the United States, Volume 2, 8/e 0205967779 / 9780205967773 MyHistoryLab for U.S. History Survey Access Card
David Goldfield
For U.S. History survey courses

Frame American history through personal and collective journeys
The American Journey: A History of the United States traces the journeys – geographical, ideological, political, and social – that make up the American experience. Harnessing the stories of individuals from different eras, the authors present a strong, clear narrative that makes American history accessible to students. Offering a blend of political and social histories, the Eighth Edition continues to show that our attempt to live up to our American ideals is an ongoing journey – one that has become increasingly more inclusive of different groups and ideas.

Also available with MyHistoryLab®
MyHistoryLab for the U.S. History survey course extends learning online to engage students and improve results. Media resources with assignments bring concepts to life, and offer students opportunities to practice applying what they’ve learned. Please note: this version of MyHistoryLab does not include an eText.

The American Journey: A History of the United States, Eighth Edition is also available via REVEL™, an interactive learning environment that enables students to read, practice, and study in one continuous experience.

Note: You are purchasing a standalone product; MyLab™ & Mastering™ does not come packaged with this content. Students, if interested in purchasing this title with MyLab & Mastering, ask your instructor for the correct package ISBN and Course ID. Instructors, contact your Pearson representative for more information.

If you would like to purchase both the physical text and MyLab & Mastering, search for:
0134376862 / 9780134376868 The American Journey: A History of the United States, Combined Volume plus MyHistoryLab for U.S. History Survey — Access Card Package, 8/e
Package consists of:
0205999727 / 9780205999729 The American Journey: A History of the United States, Combined Volume, 8/e 0205967779 / 9780205967773 MyHistoryLab for U.S. History Survey Access Card
David Goldfield
David Goldfield
A sweeping and path-breaking history of the post–World War II decades, during which an activist federal government guided the country toward the first real flowering of the American Dream.

In The Gifted Generation, historian David Goldfield examines the generation immediately after World War II and argues that the federal government was instrumental in the great economic, social, and environmental progress of the era. Following the sacrifices of the Greatest Generation, the returning vets and their children took the unprecedented economic growth and federal activism to new heights. This generation was led by presidents who believed in the commonwealth ideal: the belief that federal legislation, by encouraging individual opportunity, would result in the betterment of the entire nation. In the years after the war, these presidents created an outpouring of federal legislation that changed how and where people lived, their access to higher education, and their stewardship of the environment. They also spearheaded historic efforts to level the playing field for minorities, women and immigrants. But this dynamic did not last, and Goldfield shows how the shrinking of the federal government shut subsequent generations off from those gifts.

David Goldfield brings this unprecedented surge in American legislative and cultural history to life as he explores the presidencies of Harry S. Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, and Lyndon Baines Johnson. He brilliantly shows how the nation's leaders persevered to create the conditions for the most gifted generation in U.S. history.
Virginia DeJohn Anderson
In September 1776, two men from Connecticut each embarked on a dangerous mission. One of the men, a soldier disguised as a schoolmaster, made his way to British-controlled Manhattan and began furtively making notes and sketches to bring back to the beleaguered Continental Army general, George Washington. The other man traveled to New York to accept a captain's commission in a loyalist regiment before returning home to recruit others to join British forces. Neither man completed his mission. Both met their deaths at the end of a hangman's rope, one executed as a spy for the American cause and the other as a traitor to it. Neither Nathan Hale nor Moses Dunbar deliberately set out to be a revolutionary or a loyalist, yet both suffered the same fate. They died when there was every indication that Britain would win the American Revolution. Had that been the outcome, Dunbar, convicted of treason and since forgotten, might well be celebrated as a martyr. And Hale, caught spying on the British, would likely be remembered as a traitor, rather than a Revolutionary hero. In The Martyr and the Traitor, Virginia DeJohn Anderson offers an intertwined narrative of men from very similar backgrounds and reveals how their relationships within their families and communities became politicized as the imperial crisis with Britain erupted. She explores how these men forged their loyalties in perilous times and believed the causes for which they died to be honorable. Through their experiences, The Martyr and the Traitor illuminates the impact of the Revolution on ordinary lives and how the stories of patriots and loyalists were remembered and forgotten after independence.
Virginia DeJohn Anderson
In September 1776, two men from Connecticut each embarked on a dangerous mission. One of the men, a soldier disguised as a schoolmaster, made his way to British-controlled Manhattan and began furtively making notes and sketches to bring back to the beleaguered Continental Army general, George Washington. The other man traveled to New York to accept a captain's commission in a loyalist regiment before returning home to recruit others to join British forces. Neither man completed his mission. Both met their deaths at the end of a hangman's rope, one executed as a spy for the American cause and the other as a traitor to it. Neither Nathan Hale nor Moses Dunbar deliberately set out to be a revolutionary or a loyalist, yet both suffered the same fate. They died when there was every indication that Britain would win the American Revolution. Had that been the outcome, Dunbar, convicted of treason and since forgotten, might well be celebrated as a martyr. And Hale, caught spying on the British, would likely be remembered as a traitor, rather than a Revolutionary hero. In The Martyr and the Traitor, Virginia DeJohn Anderson offers an intertwined narrative of men from very similar backgrounds and reveals how their relationships within their families and communities became politicized as the imperial crisis with Britain erupted. She explores how these men forged their loyalties in perilous times and believed the causes for which they died to be honorable. Through their experiences, The Martyr and the Traitor illuminates the impact of the Revolution on ordinary lives and how the stories of patriots and loyalists were remembered and forgotten after independence.
Finn Orstavik
Construction innovation is an important but contested concept, both in industry practice and academic reflection and research. A fundamental reason for this is the nature of the construction industry itself: the industry and the value creation activities taking place there are multi-disciplinary, heterogeneous, distributed and often fragmented.

This book takes a new approach to construction innovation, revealing different perspectives, set in a broader context. It coalesces multiple theoretical and practice-based views in order to stimulate reflection and to prepare the ground for further synthesis. By being clear, cogent and unambiguous on the most basic definitions, it can mobilise a plurality of perspectives on innovation to promote fresh thinking on how it can be studied, enabled, measured, and propagated across the industry.

This book does not gloss over the real-life complexity of construction innovation. Instead, its authors look explicitly at the challenges that conceptual issues entail and by making their own position clear, they open up fresh intellectual space for reflection.

Construction Innovation examines innovation from different positions and through different conceptual lenses to reveal the richness that the theoretical perspectives offer to our understanding of the way that the construction sector actors innovate at both project and organizational levels.

The editors have brought together here leading scholars to deconstruct the concept of innovation and to discuss the merits of different perspectives, their commonalities and their diversity. The result is an invaluable sourcebook for those studying and leading innovation in the design, the building and the maintenance of our built environment.

Finn Orstavik
Construction innovation is an important but contested concept, both in industry practice and academic reflection and research. A fundamental reason for this is the nature of the construction industry itself: the industry and the value creation activities taking place there are multi-disciplinary, heterogeneous, distributed and often fragmented.

This book takes a new approach to construction innovation, revealing different perspectives, set in a broader context. It coalesces multiple theoretical and practice-based views in order to stimulate reflection and to prepare the ground for further synthesis. By being clear, cogent and unambiguous on the most basic definitions, it can mobilise a plurality of perspectives on innovation to promote fresh thinking on how it can be studied, enabled, measured, and propagated across the industry.

This book does not gloss over the real-life complexity of construction innovation. Instead, its authors look explicitly at the challenges that conceptual issues entail and by making their own position clear, they open up fresh intellectual space for reflection.

Construction Innovation examines innovation from different positions and through different conceptual lenses to reveal the richness that the theoretical perspectives offer to our understanding of the way that the construction sector actors innovate at both project and organizational levels.

The editors have brought together here leading scholars to deconstruct the concept of innovation and to discuss the merits of different perspectives, their commonalities and their diversity. The result is an invaluable sourcebook for those studying and leading innovation in the design, the building and the maintenance of our built environment.

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