Successful Science Communication: Telling It Like It Is

Cambridge University Press
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In the 25 years since the 'Bodmer Report' kick-started the public understanding of science movement, there has been something of a revolution in science communication. However, despite the ever-growing demands of the public, policy-makers and the media, many scientists still find it difficult to successfully explain and publicise their activities or to understand and respond to people's hopes and concerns about their work. Bringing together experienced and successful science communicators from across the academic, commercial and media worlds, this practical guide fills this gap to provide a one-stop resource covering science communication in its many different forms. The chapters provide vital background knowledge and inspiring ideas for how to deal with different situations and interest groups. Entertaining personal accounts of projects ranging from podcasts, to science festivals, to student-run societies give working examples of how scientists can engage with their audiences and demonstrate the key ingredients in successful science communication.
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About the author

David Bennett is a Guest at the Department of Biotechnology at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands and a Visitor to the Senior Combination Room of St Edmund's College, Cambridge, UK. He has long-term experience, activities and interests in the relations between science, industry, government, education, law, the public and the media and works with the European Commission, government departments, companies, universities, public interest organisations and the media in these areas.

Richard Jennings is an Affiliated Research Scholar in the Department of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge. His research interests are focused on the Responsible Conduct of Research and the ethical uses of science and technology. He is a member of BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT, has worked with the BCS Ethics Forum defining and refining the BCS Code of Conduct, and with four other members has developed a 'Framework For Assessing Ethical Issues in New Technologies'.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Cambridge University Press
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Published on
Sep 29, 2011
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Pages
501
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ISBN
9781139501149
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / Professional Development
Science / General
Science / Philosophy & Social Aspects
Science / Weights & Measures
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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